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THE LIBRARY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF 
NORTH CAROLINA 



THE COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINIAN A 



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This book must not 
be taken from the 
Library building. 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/americanjewishti15unse 



IMES-OUTLOO 



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Rosh Hashonah 

SEPTEMBER 



Robbins Mills Inc 

CLARKSVILLE FINISHING DIVISION 
CLARKSVILLE, VIRGINIA 





xssm 



A 







1953 




5714 



We Extend the Season's Greetings on Rosh 
Hashonah. It Is Our Sincere Wish That It 
Be Followed by Happiness and Prosperity in 
the New Year. 

ROBBINS MILLS INC. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



3 



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%■ f z* >/, m fiu/i// Times ■ Outlook 

Volume XIX • SEPTEMBER, 1953 // Number 1 ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ^B 1 WB mm ^B* ^B 7 ■ * 

• EDITORIALS • 

Chester A. Brown, Editor 



The New Year 

Guest Editorial by Rabbi Simcha Kling 
Beth David Synagogue — Greensboro, N.C. 

5714 is at our gates. It is the beginning of a year 
fraught with tremendous significance for Jewry and for the 
world. As Jews, we observe this sacred season by careful 
examination of ourselves as individuals and of ourselves as 
members of the Jewish people. As part of the Jewish group, 
we cannot help being thrilled at the accomplishments of 
those of our brothers who have battled for, won and main- 
tained their independence and freedom. The past five years 
of Israeli statehood should fill every one of us with deep 
pride and satisfaction, realizing at the same time the vast 
problems and great responsibilities to be faced in the coming 
year. 

It is wise — indeed, we are bidden — to stop at this time 
and recall that which has taken place. A little more than 
five years ago, our deep mourning for our murdered brethren 
in Europe was turned into joy when the nations of the 
world finally proclaimed that the Land of our Fathers shall 
be governed by their descendants. We saw the beginning of 
the fulfillment of ages of longing and dreaming, hoping and 
praying. Immediately the gates of the land were thrown 
open; the homeless and the uprooted were permitted to 
come ("to return", as the Hebrew puts it). This was not 
easy. What country could double its population without 
upsetting its economy? Here was an act unparalled in all 
history. In order to rescue brothers, in order to provide a 
Jewish home for those who wished one, immigration was 
permitted and encouraged. This meant severe austerity, for 
many years to come, but none protested such action. This 
was a great religious act — an act of self-denial for the sake 
of others, a national act of loving one's brothers. It meant 
that the Jews of America had to do their share for it was 
their burden as well. We, too, are part of KM Yisrael, of 
the Jewish family. 

The beginning was far from easy. There were not suf- 
ficient homes, food, clothing, jobs. The weak economy be- 
came even weaker. But it was done! And today, after five 
years, the future is brighter and more hopeful. Struggle and 
privation will still be the keynote this year, but the eco- 
nomic structure is sounder and is on the road to normalcy 
and health. Industry, commerce, agriculture have made tre- 
mendous strides. American Jewry will still be asked for 
liberal contributions and investments (note: BUY ISRAELI 
BONDS), but we are helping to build that which is close 
and dear, that which will contribute to us in the future, in 
non-material ways. 

These first five years brought other problems besides 
financial ones. These were the years of kibbutz galuyot, of 
the ingathering of the exiles. This meant Jewries from all 
over the world now came together. They had to learn to 
live together, to speak to each other, to work with one 
another. This meant serious educational and health prob- 
lems, because those from backward countries did not know 



Western ways and methods. These problems have not yet 
been solved, but they are on the way to solution. The signs 
of the future are most hopeful. 

After living for several years on a high pitch of idealism, 
the morale was lowered when the ideal became a reality. 
But here, too, we begin to see a change and can look for- 
ward to a State in which Jewish ideals will dominate and 
will permeate the lives of all its citizens. 

Yes, the problems to be solved are yet great, but the 
way to their solution is in sight. We Jews of America must 
not fail to do our share for, whether we will it or not, the 
fate of Israel is our fate. 

As we begin our New Year, let us be grateful to God 
for the past five years and let us pray that the next five be 
full of even greater accomplishments and blessed by peace. 

By being truly thankful for what we have and by being 
determined to fulfill our obligations and responsibilities dur- 
ing the coming years, we can indeed fulfill the prayers we 
utter on Rosh Hashana, those prayers beseeching God to re- 
member us unto chayim, unto life, unto rich, full, good 
living. 

Happy Birthday.' 

According to the Book of Psalms, when a man reaches 
the age of 70 he has lived his normal span of life. Of course, 
as is explained, this may be stretched ten years or so. 

The Book of Psalms was written many, many years ago 
and the life insurance companies would be quick to tell you 
that since these lines were penned, man's life expectancy has 
been materially increased. 

The occasion for this reference is the fact that Alfred 
Segal, better known to his friends and contemporaries as 
"Al", Cincinnati journalist and nationally read columnist, 
whose columns have appeared in the TIMES -OUTLOOK 
for the past several years, has recently celebrated his 70th 
birthday. He tells about it in his familiar "Plain Talk" 
column which appears elsewhere in this issue. 

We believe that many of our readers will find it hard to 
realize that Al Segal has passed his 70th milestone. Cer- 
tainly there has been nothing in his writing that would 
make one suspect. Of course, his frequent reference to his 
grand-children gave you to understand that he wasn't ex- 
actly a youngster. But one can be a grandfather and still 
not be 70. Mr. Segal's "youngness" as evidenced by his 
writings, merely proves the wisdom of the adage that a 
woman is as old as she looks, and a man, as old as he feels. 

Al Segal has a host of readers who look forward to his 
words of wisdom and his homey philosophies. Almost as 
well-known are his Mr. Hillel (The Hillel Widget Cor- 
poration) and his Mr. Zilch, who from time to time pinch- 
hit for him in his columns. (We suspect that these are the 
occasions when Segal doesn't want to be quoted as Segal so 
he passes the buck to his pinch-hitters) . 

We take this occasion to felicitate Al Segal on his birth- 
day, and hope that he will be spared to share his ideas and 
ideals with his readers, for many more years. 



The American Jewish Times Outlook, published monthly at 604 Southeastern Building, Greensboro, N. C. Richmond Office, Broad-Grace Arcade, Richmond, Va. Ches- 
ter a Brown, Editor; David Bernstein, Business Manager; Nathan Kessler, Advertising and Business Manager, Richmond Office; Florence Byers, Virginia News Editor, P. O. 
Box 701, Richmond, Va.; P. O. Box 1087, Greensboro, N. C. Member Seven Arts Feature Syndicate, Inc. $2.00 per year payable in advance. Entered as Second-Class Mat- 
ter at the Post Office at Greensboro, N. O, under Act of March 3, 1879. The views expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the publishers, but may be published in 
the interest of freedom of the press. The American Jewish Times Outlook is owned and edited solely as an independent enterprise and is not a Jewish community undertaking. 



6 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




Zhe Old Kabbi 
J&oks At Zhe Hubble 



SYLVAN KARCHMER 



By SYLVAN KARCHMER 



Sylvan Karchmer is another new writer whom we welcome to the pages of 
THE AMERICAN JEWISH TIMES-OUTLOOK. He is a young Oregonian, 
coming from the city of Eugene. He sometimes writes under the nom de plume 
of Lee Brian, and we trust that his first effort in these columns will be read 
with interest.— THE EDITOR. 



Don't mind my garrulity. For 
forty-seven years my sermons were 
models of compression and exercises 
in logic. If I ramble at present, you 
must put it down to the ambiguities 
of age. The sharpness, the bite, the 
incisiveness, are gone. As the poet 
would have it, the ax has been laid 
to the tree. The heart is drying up, 
and the chemicals are seeping only 
tepidly through the blood channels 
where once they coursed furiously. 
But what can an old man expect? 
Half the people alive in this city 
weren't born when they laid that 
foundation. I'll stand here for five 
minutes. Give me three hundred 
seconds and then I'll get on. 

A. S. L. Gammel was president of 
the congregation when my temple 
was built. I can just see him before 
me in his high wing collar and chin 
whiskers, his leonine head erect, the 
merchant prince, son of a Bavarian 
immigrant who'd made the first for- 
tune in this city. 

I'll just stand here out of the way 
of the workers. There they go 
about their tasks, these avengers of 
time. In ten days the lot will be 
empty again, and the boys in the 
neighborhood will play cops and 
robbers on the heaps of Carrara 
marble. 

Here's a maple I planted on the 
northeast corner — in memory of the 
small daughter of E. Bernard, back 
in 1913. Now see what a beautiful 
old tree it has become. Each spring 
when I preached the Passover morn- 
ing sermon I could see its broad 
leaves spreading a shade over the 
sidewalk. The child's face, too, I 
could see. She should have been . . . 
let me think ... in her late forties, 
a member of the Sisterhood, a 
grandmother herself by now. But 
she lies under a little sleeping dove 
peacefully asleep in White Creek 
Cemetery. 



There I'm rambling again. I was 
talking about the Gammels. No one 
remembers them now; back in the 
1900's they ran this congregation, 
and their store down at Pipe and 
Main was a state institution. They 
even advertised in the New York 
papers, the ones that are gone now, 
the World and the Sun. Old Gam- 
mel met me at the Cotton Belt 
Depot and brought me out here. 
September. How warm it was! And 
this was my first pulpit. Gammel's 
temple, the wags used to say. But 
make no mistake — the old man had 
a taste for elegance. Red plush car- 
pets and fancy hanging chandeliers, 
all the way from Paris. 

The lectern's exposed to the sky 
now. My first sermon. Mm'mm — 
still have the notes, yellowed with 
age, along with my notes for the 
other six thousand sermons I deliv- 
ered standing in front of the ark. I 
said six thousand sermons but that 
figure doesn't include the White 
Creek Cemetery funeral sermons. 
The acres are full out there and each 
acre represents I don't know how 
many talks. 

I also lectured to Rotary clubs 
and Lions organizations, to Brother- 
hood groups, to university students, 
to conventions of dentists and farm- 
ers and realtors. I even talked to 
the Klan. A couple of the members 
challenged me to come over and tell 
them why I opposed them. Old 
Gammel's son Eliot was the presi- 
dent of the temple then and he said, 
Why don't you ignore them, Rabbi. 
How can I remain a good American 
and ignore them, I asked him. And 
I went over to their meeting and 
denounced them, and, well, I'm still 
here, as you can see. 

What was I saying? Oh, yes, 
White Creek Cemetery. We buried 
old Gammel in one of the choice 



lots that overlooked the lake. Eliot's 
gone, too. His idea was to make 
the congregation a closed club. Too 
many Polish and eastern Jews were* 
coming in, he fretted to me onr 
afternoon. He didn't want the con 
gregation to lose its basic affiliation, 
which was German Jewish. He 
shouldn't have worried He didn't 
live until the 30's, when we started 
getting back the Germans. And now 
we've got all kinds, Russian, Polish, 
English . . . twelve hundred and 
fifty of them . . . and no one wor- 
ries about origins too much. 

Yes, Eliot's out there. And old 
Edward Brandenburg, who bought 
the most exclusive lot in the ceme- 
tery and seeded it with St. Augus- 
tine grass, imported Italian cy- 
presses, and then got lost in a plane 
over the Gulf. And let's see who 
else is out there — Charles Travers 
and Maurice Rosenfeld and Luit- 
pold Greenbaum and Samson Mar- 
shall . . . the old-timers . . . Spruce 
and hemlock and poplars cover 
their stones. And the new old-tim- 
ers are there, too. The ones Eliot 
tried unsuccessfully to keep out. 
Down town their sons are bank 
presidents and prominent realtors; 
they sit on government commissions 
and fly to places like Karachi to sell 
lumber by the shipload. One of the 
boys whose grandfather had a sec- 
ond-hand store on Deep Mill went 
down to Washington a few days 
ago, I noticed in the paper, and 
argued a case before the Supreme 
Court. And another one — as a mat- 
ter of fact, the new temple presi- 
dent, who selected the lot over on 
the west side for the new building- 
used to sell papers when he was a 
boy on the corner of Preston and 
Fox. They tell me that the new 
temple will cost five million dollars; 
and I imagine no matter how you 



figure it, five million in 1953 is a lot 
more than fifty thousand was in 
1903. 

The first temple was before my 
time. It was a hall on Worth Street, 
over a harness shop, that seated 
fifty people. Records show that this 
congregation was organized in the 
70's; but before that, old Otto Tue- 
bingen, that fine old patriarch who 
was still alive when I came here, 
told me once that he brought the 
Sefer Torah from St. Louis on his 
wagon; that was in the 60's after 
the war. Now rabbi, he said to me, 
I am worried about what will hap 
pen when we all are gone; the con- 
gregation will fold up and the Torah 
will go to the museum in Fair Park. 
Mind you, that was in 1905. . . 

Old man Tuebingen, you were 
wrong of course. You took your 
morning paper too seriously. Yes, 
there was Kishineff and the Ruman- 
ian slaughters, and after the first 
war, Petlura and, later, that new 
Chnieknicki, who butchered six 
million of us before he was stopped. 
And yes, now they are starting it all 
over again in other countries and 
every day the papers tell us of a new 
disaster. But we never had to fold 
up here. Three times in forty years 
we replaced the plush carpet that 
old Gammel ordered from New 
York. We repaired the room and in- 
stalled air conditioning; we knocked 
out two walls and doubled the seat- 
ing capacity, and still we never had 
enough room. 

In 1950 a committee called on 
me. Lipman Costa, who was old 
Tuebingen's grandson, was its 
spokesman. That's a mighty enter- 
prising young man for you, inci- 
dentally. Owns the smartest fashion 
shop west of the Mississippi. De- 
signers from Paris, and he runs a 
page ad in a swanky New York 
(Please Turn to Page 22) 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



1 



It Happened in the Year 5713 

Four Jewish Men and One Jewish Woman Selected Citizen 

of the Year in North Carolina and 
Virginia Communities 





JOSEPH H. HANCHROW 

Joseph H. Hanchrow, local accountant 
and civic leader, was named Wilson's 
"Man of the Year," by the Junior 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Mr. Hanchrow received the coveted 
award during Jaycee banquet held at 
the Wilson Moose Lodge. 

He was selected as recipient of the 
honor by a secret committee composed 
of a number of Wilson's leading 
citizens. 



The coveted designation "Man of 
the Year" and "Woman of the 
Year" was bestowed on fonr men 
and one woman during the past 
year, in five communities in Vir- 
ginia and North Carolina. The five 
thus highly honored are Mrs. Em- 
manuel Falk and Le Rov Spegel, of 
Newport News, Va.; Leon Glob- 
man, of Martinsville, Va.; Elliott 
Schewel, of Lynchburg, Va., and Jo- 
seph H. Hanchrow, of Wilson, 
N. C. 

The most significant fact in con- 
nection with these honors, is that 
all are communities where the Jew- 
ish population is comparativelv 
small. With thousands of non-Jews 
from whom a choice could have 
been made, Jewry can well be proud 



of the selection of their co-religion- 
ists for this signal designation. In 
all cases those chosen were prom- 
inent not only in the Jewish activi- 
ties in their communities, but also 
found the time to devote their ef- 
forts to general civic and communal 
work. This is ample refutation for 
the charge frequently made, that 
Jews crawl into their shells and hold 
themselves apart from matters not 
immediately affecting their religion. 

In each case notation was made 
of the honor bestowed at the time 
of the award, and congratulations 
extended. We deem it of sufficient 
importance to devote this page in 
further tribute, as one of the out- 
standing symbols of progress in the 
vear 5713. 




ELLIOT SCHEWEL 

Elliot Schewel was honored when he 
was presented with the Lynchburg, Va., 
Junior Chamber of Commerce's Annual 
Distinguished Service Award as Man 
of the Year at the Jaycees Bosses Night 
Banquet at the Virginian. Mr. Schewel, 
considered to have made one of the 
most outstanding contributions to 
Lynchburg during the past year. 





LEROY SPIEGEL 

Mr. Leroy Spigel of Newport News, 
Va., was named "Man of the Year" by 
tthe Peninsula Junior Chamber of 
Commerce for his outstanding work in 
civic and community activities. During 
the past few years, Mr. Spigel has been 
a conscientious worker for the Red 
Cross and Community Chest Drives in 
Newport News. 




MRS. EMANUEL FALK 

Mrs. Emanuel Falk was paid her recog- 
nition as Newport New's "Woman of 
the Year" by the Newport News Junior 
Woman's Club at the Williamsburg 
Lodge. Mrs. Falk has been active for 
many years in both civic and Jewish 
organizations. She is a contributing 
board member of the Newport News- 
Warwick Community Chest. 




LEON GLOBMAN 

Leon Globman was named the Out- 
standing Citizen of the year 1953 in 
Martinsville by the Junior Chamber of 
Commerce of Martinsville, Va. Leon 
Globman is a graduate of the University 
of Virginia where he received the high- 
est scholastic average ever achieved in 
the School of Business Administration. 



8 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



Columbia Pictures Presents "The Juggler 

The SHwy of an Epoch Making Film — An Interview with the Director 

By FANNIE E. KESSLER 



Every once and a while a picture is born that defies even the customary enthusi- 
astic description associated with Hollywood by tradition, to do it justice. Such 
a picture is "The Juggler", screen adaptation of Michael Blankfort's novel 
of the same name. All of the outdoor scenes were made in the State of Israel, 
and the work is a triumph, not only for the sterling cast, but for the director, 
Edward Dmytryk. Mrs. Kessler was privileged to interview Mr. Dmytryk while 
in Hollywood recently, and her impressions are herewith given as a prologue 
to a review of the Dicture itself. — The Editor. 



It was in the dim-lighted, little 
restaurant of Italian vintage that we 
sat and waited for the man I was to 
interview. We did not wait lunch 
and was dawdling over the anti- 
pasto, while we glanced about. The 
comfortable booths were tenanted 
by many famous persons, both in 
name and directing, producing pro- 
fession. There was a cool, and 
quiet air of relaxation so strangely 
missing from most of the hectic but 
famous Hollywood restaurants. Ov- 
erhead the bottles of Chianti wine 
and wonderful cheeses hung from 
the rafters, and gave the atmosphere 
enchantment. 

In the next booth several men 
listened attentively to Stanley 
Kramer, who could depart from the 
run-of-themill humdrum and give us 



the many remarkable pictures that 
brought stark reality to us in a new 
form. 

Quietly and with the deep inten- 
sity that underscored everything he 
did, Mr. Edward Dmytryk arrived. 
Most men would be called stocky if 
they resembled this man's type but 
he only impressed you with the 
compactness of physique and the 
quiet observance of the world 
around him. You noticed his eyes 
first, then again and lastly, because 
they were centered on everything 
and the center of everything. He 
ordered and ate casually. He looked 
like a successful business man but 
when he spoke there was inspira- 
tion in everything he told you. 

The story of the picture we leave 
to the discourse on it, printed below 



but in his own story we find the 
reason why he was able to film and 
bring to everyone who sees this pic- 
ture the reality of Israel. He was 
deeply enthralled with this retro- 
spective view of this new and great 
country as it unfolded before his 
eyes, that you lived it with him. Of 
what he had seen; the unfolding 
of a nation, not embrvonic now, and 
the flame of Youth there that was 
the dominant present and future of 
Israel. 

You could feel that he had 
delved into the hearts and thoughts 
of these people that he might know 
personally about the re-birth of a na- 
tion. To drink deeply of the beauty 
of the country, and to come away 
with the knowledge that the future 
was good there. Mr. Dymtryk spoke 
of the knowledge of the people of 
Israel, their happy reflexes towards 
the world. Their sincere desire to 
be able to live in peace with their 
Arab neighbor. International poli- 
tics have long played their dissenting 



part in the relationship but that the 
habitants of Israel want to get along 
with their neighbors was a precluded 
belief. 

Dmytryk spoke with fine inten- 
sity of the problems of the country; 
the reaction of youth towards the 
religious and dietary laws as empow- 
ered by one of the great and po- 
litical religious groups in Israel. The 
youth of the country has asked many 
questions as to these things; refusing 
the accepted heredity of blindlv fol- 
lowing these laws. But, he added, 
with the educational values advanc- 
ing and the mature judgment of the 
majority of future leaders amongst 
the Youth of the country, this prob- 
lem of adaptation between the older 
and younger groups, each giving a 
little that a happy medium be 
found. 

There is a vibrancy about this 
man that shows in his direction of 
this great picture "The Juggler". His 
deeply toned understanding of the 
Land of Israel reflects in each actor 



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WEST POINT UTLIZATION COMPANY 
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Subsidiaries 



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Cabin Crafts, Inc. 
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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



? 



Columbia Pictures Corporation 
Presents 

A STANLEY KRAMER COMPANY 
Production 

KIRK DOUGLAS 
in 

THE JUGGLER 

With 
MILLY VITALE 



Paul Stewart Joey Walsh Alf Kjellin Beverly Washburn 
Charles Lane John Banner Richard Benedict 
and Oscar Karlweis 

Screen Play by . _ MICHAEL BLANKFOBT 

Based on his novel, "The Juggler' 

Music Score GEORGE ANTHEIL 

Musical Director MORRIS STOLOFF 

Associate Producer MICHAEL BLANKFORT 

Production Design by RUDOLPH STERNAD 

Editorial Supervision HARRY GERSTAD, A.C.E. 

Production Manager . CLEM BEAUCHAMP 

Director of Photography ..... ROY HUNT 

Art Director ROBERT PETERSON 

Film Editor AARON STELL, A.C.E. 

Set Decorator FRANK TUTTLE 

Assistant Director CARTER DeHAVEN, JR. 

Technical Adviser DAVID ANDERMAN 

Sound Engineer LODGE CUNNINGHAM 

Orchestrations by ARTHUR MORTON 

Directed by EDWARD DMYTRYK 




Hans and Ya' El Join in the Traditional Hora 



of the cast, and their portrayal of 
their role. 

When we left our interview and 
the restaurant, we stood in the 
bright California sunlight, so much 
like the climate of Israel, and talked 
for a moment. We felt we had been 
privileged to have this interview 
with Mr. Dymtryk who left us with 
a bouyancy and sense of inspiration 
with which only a charming and 
deeply understanding person could 
imbue one. 

(Please Turn to Page 48) 



At this High H 

_ 


oly 


Day s 
SUA*? 


urns* 1 
iMtnaaJ 






ISRAEL BONDS 



You con get a Prospectus and buy your 
Bond at American Financial and 
Development Corporation for Israel 

258 Boush Street 
NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 



fit 



$bgtiuim (Jean 

wgfc i'k. ISRAEL 

Rosh Hashanah begins on the eve of September 9th, 
but it's not too early to send the gift that will bring joy to 
their hearts and precious food to their holiday table . . . 

give Snap feJttes 

for $10, $15 and $25, redeemable at any time before the holidays and in 
between for their unrestricted choice of ration-free kosher foods and 
other necessities in our gift shops in Tel Aviv, Haifa and Jerusalem 

. . . or 

which they exchange at our convenient pick-up centers for your 
choice of these seven new and improved kosher gift parcels, packed 
in Israel and ready for delivery after August 10th . . . now 
revised to give you even more variety and greater value in each and 
every package . . . Standard, $10.50; Glatt Standard, $10.50 
Special, $14.50; Glatt Special, $14.50; Super, $19.50 
Select, $26.50 and Family, $38.50. 



INc. 



H. H. KAISER CO. P. O. Box 63 Tel. 2-2507 ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



10 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



The Jewish Community Center — Its First 100 Years 



The interesting and profoundly 
effective role of the Jewish Com- 
munity Center and YM-YWHA 
in the creation of our American 
Jewish community is appropriately 
dramatized by the one hundredth 
anniversary of this institution. The 
celebration of the centennial of the 
Jewish Community Center, which 
is to begin on a nation wide basis 
in the fall of this vear and continue 
until the spring of '54, calls the 
attention of American Jewry to an 
agencv in Jewish life which has 
served with skill and devoted intelli- 
gence in good times and bad, in war 
years and in peace. 

It was in the year 1854, in the city 
of Baltimore, that a Young Men's 



Hebrew Association was organized. 
This modest forerunner of the mod- 
ern Jewish Community Center arose 
in response to a need; the Center 
as we know it today is still in the 
business of responding to needs. In 
fact it is this very responsiveness, 
and the sensitive flexibility of the 
Center program and function, that 
are its keenest elements of service. 
And it must be noted, in this con- 
nection, that a large share of credit 
for the Center's time-and emer- 
gency-tested ability to serve the 
Jewish community so magnificently 
goes to the organization that is the 
focal point of the Jewish Com- 
munity Center movement: the Na- 
tional Jewish Welfare Board. The 



JVVB — as this national association 
of Jewish Community Centers and 
Young Men's-W omen's Hebrew 
Associations is popularly known — 
has in the decades of its existence 
served as leader, guide, adviser, and 
coordinator of the Centers and Ys 
of the nation — as resource, stimula- 
tor, and representative of the Center 
movement. 

Earnestly engaged in preserving 
the Jewish heritage and making its 
riches and strengths available to an 
ever-increasing number of Jews, the 
Center has bent its splendid efforts 
toward helping individual Jews be- 
come informed and understanding 
Americans and affirmative, loyal 
Jews. The contribution and achieve- 



ment of the Center in the course 
of its century of existence give us 
a sense of gladness and wholesome 
pride. Its work during this substan- 
tial stretch of time encourages us to 
look ahead with eager interest to the 
years before us, to the constructive 
role the Jewish Community Center 
will play in the continuing develop- 
ment of the American Jewish com- 
munity. A genuinely impelling 
force, the Center in its exciting life- 
time has made a truly imponderable 
contribution to an invigorated Jew- 
ish life in America and can be 
counted upon to deepen and expand 
its dramatic and dynamic role in 
the life of American Jewry. 




MORALE: On the Mexican border, 1916. 



ADULT EDUCATION: An evening class in English, in the 20s, at the 

N. Y. YWHA. 




FESTIVAL CELEBRATIONS: The ladies ob PHYSICAL EDUCATION: A team of gymnasts 
serve Sukkos in traditional manner. at the 92nd St. Y, 1898. 



HANUKAH: A magnificent pageant, in 
New York, presented by the Y at Acad- 
emv of Music, 1879. 




JWB FOUNDERS: Col. Harry Cutler, first president of JWB (seated, rftnN rDeTnMr i Avivr D _„ n /r . x 

. „ • ■ • , -vj 11 i ••nit l II i COKINLKSIONL LAYING: Pres. Coohdge (front row, center) at < 

center), flanked by such distinguished colleagues as Louis Marshall and _ . .,, _ _ _ . , V, A inor 

. r. V i ii c. j- >»j * i t. r» r» a i i c i n i mony of Washington, D. C, Jewish Community Center, 1925. 

' Dr. Cyrus Adler. Standing, 2d from left, Dr. David de Sola Pool. ' ° * ' ' 



Tne American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



11 



New Year Greetings From Three Governors 






HON. JAMES F. BYRNES 



HON. JOHN S. BATTLE 



HON. WILLIAM B. UMSTEAD 



mm 



STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA 
OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR 
COLUMBIA 

July 28, 1953 

I am pleased to have this opportunity to 
send greetings to the readers of the Times- 
Outlook on the occasion of the Jewish New Year, 

I wish for each one a memorable celebra- 
tion and the best of Happy New Years. 

With best wishes, I am 

Sincerely yours, 



JFB ;mkd 




Commonwealth of Virginia 

Governor's Office 

Richmond 

It gives me pleasure to extend my 
greetings and best wishes on the occasion of 
the celebration of the Jewish New Year. 

America has risen to its present 
status as a champion of freedom and democracy 
by reason of the united efforts of all our 
people and it is particularly fitting that we 
recognize at this time the outstanding contri- 
bution of the Jewish people to the development 
and progress of this great counry. 

Sincerely yours, 



aht 



j g^o fin S. Battle 




STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 
GOVERNOR'S OFFICE 
RALEIGH 

July 31, 1953 



I am happy to have this opportunity to 
send my greetings to all my Jewish friends and 
to Jewish people everywhere on the occasion of 
the Jewish New Year. I wish for you during 
the coming year good health, happiness and 
generous rewards for your labors. I am aware 
of the many contributions made to the life of 
North Carolina and to the Nation by the mem- 
bers of the Jewish race. Your skill, talents 
and industry have established records in the 
business world, the professional fields, the 
arts and in many other outlets of human 
endeavor. 

Jewish leaders have been outstanding 
exponents of the creed of brotherhood among 
all men. They have contributed a great deal 
to the establishment of better understanding 
and tolerance in our human relationships. 



I am 



With kindest regards and best wishes, 



Sincerely yours, 




The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



For The Most 




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Preparatory 
Equipment of J 
All Types M 




ROSH HASHONAH ON THE 
HILLS OF EPHRAIM 

By CHARLES PASSMAN, Director of Molben 



9 Cylinder High Speed Slasher for all type yarns 

High Speed Rayon Slashers 

High Speed Section Beam Warpers for Cotton 

High Speed Spindle Driven Warpers for Rayon 

High Speed Balling Warpers 

High Speed Tricot Warpers 

High Speed Narrow Fabric Warpers 

High Speed Heavy Duty Collecting Beamers 

High Speed Light Collecting Beamers 

High Speed Warpers for Dye Beams 

Magazine Cone Creels for Cotton and Rayon 

Special Creels 

Warp Gassing Machines 

Warp Dyeing Machines 

Special Warp Handling Equipment 

Stainless Steel Cylinders and Vats 
for all Textile Purposes 

Stainless Steel Cooking and Storage Kettles 



LE4 




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Machine and Foundry Co., Gastonia, N. C. 



WORLD'S LARGEST DESIGNERS AND BUILDERS OF COMPLETE 
WARP PREPARATORY EQUIPMENT 



As dusk begins to settle over the 
hills of Ephraim, a long procession 
of white-clad figures begins to wind 
its way through the lanes of Ein 
Shcmer, a small village halfway be- 
tween Haifa and Tel Aviv, on the 
edge of the Israel coastal plain. The 
procession is remarkable not only for 
its raiment — the traditional garb 
worn by orthodox Jews on Rosh 
Hashonah and Yom Kippur — but 
also for the age of those in it. Every- 
one in the long line is more than 60 
years old. For this is a unique village 
in a unique country — a complete 
community of aged, all of them re- 
cent immigrants. 

For most of them this is the first 
New Year which they are spending 
in the village, which has been estab- 
lished by Malben, the Joint Distri- 
bution Committee's program in 
Israel. Most of the old folk have 
been in the country two or three 
years. But, because they had no 
means and no place to go, until now 
they had been unable to leave the 
tents and corrugated iron shacks of 
the immigrant camps, in which their 
more fortunate fellow - immigrants 
spent shorter periods. And, were it 
not for American Jewry and its con- 
tributions to the United Jewish Ap- 
peal, none of the 1,000 aged of Ein 
Shemer would be able to spend their 
first New Year's Eve in the village 
that will be home to them for the 
rest of their lives. 

And so in the synagogues of Ein 
Shemer (there are four small ones 
to permit immigrant groups from 
all parts of the world to celebrate 
the high holidays in the manner to 
which thev have been accustomed 
all their lives) as well as in syna- 
gogues in nine smaller old-age homes 
set up by Malben in other parts of 
the countrv — a thousand old men 
and women are thinking, this Rosh 
Hashonah, of all those across the sea 
who have made it possible for them 
to find shelter for the evening of 
their lives. 

A walk through these little syna- 
gogues would reflect the diverse 
strains in Israel's present population 
through the bustling streets of Tel 

Aviv. 

In Ein Shemer, for example, serv- 
ices are held in the Ashkenazi 
(Western European) tradition, in 
Sephardic style (by Jews from 
Greece, Bulgaria and Turkey whose 
migration from Spain hundreds of 



years ago is proclaimed by the fact 
that they all know Ladino) and in 
Yemenite fashion. Walking into the 
Yemenite synagogue, one is imme- 
diately struck by one phenomenom 
— that half the men appear to be 
reading the prayer books upside- 
down or sideways. This does not 
mean that they cannot read — on the 
contrary. Their strange ability was 
born in years of training in the small 
cheders of the desert villages, where 
books were a rare treasure and a 
dozen or more pupils had to share 
one copy seated in a circle around 
their teacher. 

Equallv striking in their syna- 
gogue is the beauty of the Scroll of 
the Law, written on thick leather 
with an ink derived from native 
plants of the Yemen and inscribed 
by means of goose quills or other 
feathers. On the other hand, their 
womenfolk, seated in a separate 
room, are not able to read at all be- 
cause, since women do not play an 
essential part in orthodox Jewish rit- 
ual, it was considered unnecessary to 
teach them to read. 

Another group of Malben patients 
who are particularly joyous this New 
Year are the residents of the Jaffa 
old-age home, because they have 
been able to extend the hospitality 
of their synagogue to residents of a 
nearby housing project for new im- 
migrants. Feeling elated that they 
can offer something to the younger 
generation, they have gladly opened 
their doors to their new neighbors. 

Stories of this kind could be told 
about Rosh Hashonah observances 
at a great many of the hospitals, cus- 
todial care centers and sheltered 
workshops which Malben has estab- 
lished for sick, invalid and handi- 
capped immigrants all over the 
country — such as the story of wheel- 
chair patients of the Machaneh Yis- 
rael hospital, who mingle on New 
Year's Day with personnel from the 
nearby airport of Lydda, giving to 
voungsters recovering slowly from 
polio a chance to discuss earnestly 
with visiting airmen the mechanics 
of jet propulsion. 

And the new year also brings hope 
to the many who are still waiting for 
their turn — the thousands of aged, 
the hundreds of invalids and the 
handicapped workers. For Malben 
is building new homes for old folk, 
expanding its facilities for those who 
need institutional care, and seeking 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



13 



new ways and means of integrating 
those with permanent handicaps 
into the economic life of their new 
country. 

It is just over three and a half 
years since Malben was founded. In 
this period, no less than 35,000 new 
immigrants have benefited directly 
from Malben services — by receiving 
hospital treatment, often for pro- 
longed periods, by attending one of 
the out-patient clinics which sup- 
plv orthopedic appliances, artificial 
limbs, spectacles, dentures, and even 
motorized tricycles for the legless 
and paralyzed; or by entering a cus- 
todial care center for chronic pa- 
tients or one of the ten old-age 
homes for the thousands of old folk 
who came to Israel with no money 
and no one to welcome them. 

The landmarks of the past year 
are: the abolition of waiting lists for 
TB patients — no mean achievement 
considering that a known 4,000 TB 
sufferers have entered the country 
since 1948, at a time when existing 
bed capacitv for TB patients was 
onlv 500; the completion of the lar- 
gest TB hospital in the Middle East, 
which Malben established at Be'er 
Yaacov and opened in stages from 
mid-1951 onward; and the opening 
of a unique institution- — a home for 
aged, chronic TB patients who, 
while able to walk about, cannot 
mingle with the community at large 
because of the danger of infection, 
yet do not need hospital care. 

Another milestone was the official 
inauguration of the Ein Shemer 
"Village for the Aged," a complete 
community of a thousand old immi- 
grants. Its facilities are being fur- 
ther extended so that another 500 
aged will soon be able to leave their 
tents or corrugated iron huts in im- 
migrant camps, where they may have 




Dr. Arthur T. Jacobs, of Larchmont, 
N. Y., management consultant of the 
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of 
New York, has been appointed Ex- 
ecutive Director of HIAS, the Hebrew 
Immigrant Aid Society, major global mi- 
gration agency, to succeed Isaac L. 
Asofsky, who retired from active service 
with the Society last November, it was 
announced by Ben Touster, President 
of HIAS. 



BUCKINGHAM-VIRGINIA 
SLATE CORPORATION 



1953 




5714 




eee^ 



V 





Westover: This historic Virginia Mansion is roofed for permanence and beauty with BUCKINGHAM-VIRGINIA SLATE. 



Photo by I'a. C. of C. 



For over five generations BUCKINGHAM slate has. been selected as 
the best roofing material for many of the outstanding examples of 
architecture throughout America. No machine-made roofing product 
has ever surpassed the charm and permanence of this hand-crafted 
product of nature. 

A BUCKINGHAM slate roof has many EXTRA-VALUE features . . . 
unfading color and lustre can be matched after any length of time, 
protection from elements for life of building, no costly repairs, no 
ultimate replacement, higher resale value, insurance and loan advan- 
tages, safe fire protection, lowest average absorption and highest 
resistance to acids of any slate in America. 

Proven by 150 continuous years on the roof without fading or decay, 
BUCKINGHAM slate can be specified with confidence. Architects may 
select from a wide range of sizes and thicknesses, and prompt ship- 



ments can be made from the ample stocks of our quarries at 
Arvonia, Virginia. 

Because of their insistence upon quality materials today, more 
architects than ever are giving their clients the benefit of this lifetime 
roof economy. See our catalog in Sweet's Architectural File, or write 
for samples and information. 



BUCKINGHAM-VIRGINIA 

SLATE CORPORATION 

1103 E. MAIN ST. • RICHMOND, VA. 




14 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




"I shoulda stayed single" 

Poor old Mom never gets a chance at the telephone. Her teen-age son, teen-age 
daughter, and husband have a virtual monopoly on making calls. Fortunately, 
most people on party lines are more considerate. They keep their calls reason- 
ably brief and allow time between calls for others to use the line. These are 
simple courtesies, but they enable everyone to share in good telephone service. 
The Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Company of Virginia. 



CORRUGATED... 

FIBRE BOXES 




MANUFACTURE R S OF COMW&ATED BHIPPtfm CONTAINERS 

^Richmond. 



§1 



2000 Jefferson Davis Highway 
Telephone 82-1292 



spent up to three years since their 
arrival in the country. Life in the 
"Village for the Aged" will mean for 
them not only an improvement in 
accomodation, but a move to what 
will be their home for the rest of 
their lives, integration into a perma- 
nent community and the chance to 
be as useful and productive as their 
physical condition permits. For 
nearly all the work of the village — 
from vegetable-growing to bookkeep- 
ing—is done by the residents them- 
selves. 

The changes in Israel's economic 
climate that have taken place of late 
have increased the difficulties of in- 
tegrating into the economy those 
immigrants with permanent handi- 
caps, who might have found work 
when all labor was at a premium. 
These are the blind, victims of 
trachoma, the Oriental eye-disease; 
the hundreds suffering from severe 
internal diseases contracted in con- 
centration camps or as the result of 
starvation and miserable housing 
conditions in Oriental ghettos; and 
the many amputees, cripples, and 
partially paralyzed who form a grave 
problem even in a more absorptive 
economy. 

Malben therefore has had to re- 
double its efforts to find work for 
them, to establish additional shel- 
tered workshops where they can be 
given jobs suited to their physical 
condition, and to extend its con- 
structive loan project, under which 
those able to operate small shops 
(Please Turn to Page 114) 




Benzion Kuncman, two-year-old Israeli 
polio victim, whose last hope to be able 
to walk lies in the unique treatment he 
can obtain at the Bellevue Medical Cen- 
ter in New York, as he arrived in the 
U. S. along with his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. David Kuncman, with the aid of 
HIAS, the Hebrew Immigrant Aid So- 
ciety. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 15 

A Week liel&ie Rad/i ctfadAoaaA 

By MOSES W. BECKELMAN, Director General, Overseas Operations, Joint Distribution Committee 



It was an ordinary day in the his- 
tory of the Joint Distribution Com- 
mittee. With Rosh Hashonah 5714 
a little more than a week away, an 
art exhibit opened in Paris featuring 
drawings done by some of the 1,000 
Jewish boys and girls, most of them 
orphans, who live in JDC-supported 
homes and institutions in France. 
In Munich, Germany, a transport of 
"hard core" cases — young people 
and old people, the victims of 
Nazism whose scars are taking long- 
est to heal — boarded a train for Nor- 
way. In Casablanca, Morocco, a new 
class of ragged ghetto children en- 
rolled in the local Alliance Israelite 
School. In Beersheba, Israel, a gro- 
cery store opened in an immigrant 
camp. 

These were ordinary events in the 
history of JDC because they happen 
every day. But to the human beings 
whose lives were touched by them, 
they were moments of high drama. 
They made up those brief instants 
in time when an old life is cast aside, 
ready to be forgotten, and a new life 
begins. It was fitting that they took 
place only a short time before the 
old year ended, and a new year 
opened. 

These ordinary and extraordinary 
events are bound together. One link 
connects the Jewish orphan in 
France to the grocer in Beersheba. 
One chain holds the tuberculosis 
DP, bound for a new home in Nor- 
way, to the street urchin in Moroc- 
co. That link, that chain has been 
forged by the Jews of America who 
— through their support of the Unit- 
ed Jewish Appeal — make the work 
of the Joint Distribution Commit- 
tee possible. 

The Story of Noel Kempler 

Among the paintings hung in the 
Paris salon are several by Noel 
Kempler, 14 years old, one of nearly 
a thousand Jewish war orphans still 
under JDC's care in France. In 
1945, when Noel first entered the 
JDC orpanage which has become 
his home, the psychiatrist attached 
to the institution asked the child to 
draw a picture of himself and of the 
house he lives in. Noel sat down 
and sketched a house suspended in 
space, constructed almost entirely of 
bars. The self-portrait showed a 
thin, sad child dressed in the striped 
clothing of a concentration camp 
prisoner. 



What was the story behind this 
tortured child? When Noel was 
four years old, living in Paris during 
the war, Nazi troopers arrested his 
parents and deported them to con- 
centration camp from which they 



never returned. Noel, visiting an 
aunt at the time, was saved. But 
from that moment until the day of 
liberation, the boy spent his days 
confined to one room in a boarding 
house to prevent his discovery by 



the Nazis. Images of concentration 
camps began to haunt him. The 
World — the four walls of his room 
— closed in. 

When Paris was freed, Noel was 
placed in a JDC home for Jewish 



UlRGinin ElECTRSC MID POWER COmPMW 




UPPER FIGURES 
No. of Shareholders 

LOWER FIGURES 
Total Shares 



VEPCO, A PUBLIC UTILITY 



Vepco stock is widely held by the Public 
— in fact, it is held in every State in the 
Union. Men hold slightly more Common 
stock than women, but the women hold 
almost twice as much Preferred stock of 
Vepco as do men. A breakdown of 
Vepco stock holdings shows the follow- 
ing distribution: 





Common 


Preferred 




Stock 


Stock 


Men 


1,038,822 


41,767 


Women 


922,01 1 


74,617 


Joint Accounts 


157,295 


3,797 


Trust Accounts 


464,892 


41,871 


Nominees 


1,421,538 


125,504 


Institutions and 






Others 


1,436,476 


201,915 


Total Shares 


5,441,034 


489,471 



There are about 22,000 holders of 
Vepco's Common stock and 7,800 
holders of its Preferred stock. Nearly 
10,000 of these reside within the area 
served by the company, which includes 



most of the State of Virginia and parts 
of West Virginia and of North Carolina. 

These stockholders, through voluntary 
investment, have helped make possible 
the large annual construction programs 
of Vepco, particularly during the past 
seven years, during which time the com- 
pany has more than doubled its gener- 
ating capacity, which now totals over 
1,000,000 kilowatts. And, approxi- 
mately $40,000,000 more is being 
spent this year by Vepco for more 
power station capacity at its Ports- 
mouth and Possum Point stations and on 
its new hydro development on the 
Roanoke River, where the Free Enter- 
prise system recently won such a notable 
decision from the United States Supreme 
Court. 

These new projects offer further op- 
portunities to the Public to invest in 
them, if they see fit. Those who do not 
see fit will not be taxed to make the 
projects possible. 



P.S. — A copy of our Annual Report 
will be gladly mailed upon request. 



16 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



BALTIMORE, MD. 




P. H. VOLK and COMPANY 




Rhinestone and Cut Steel Slipper Ornaments 
Infants' and Children's Footwear 
Boudoir and Ballet Slippers 
Bathing Caps and Slippers 

Satin, Leather and Felt Slippers 

Shoe Store Supplies and Shoe Findings 

2 & 4 West Lombard St., Baltimore I, Maryland 



war orphans. There, he began to 
know gentleness and kindness again. 
The directors of the home, a young 
married couple, made sure Noel ate 
hot, nourishing meals, they sent him 
to school, encouraged him to join 
the other children at play. The 
warm, attractive way in which the 
Jewish holidays were celebrated 
awoke a new interest in the child, 
strengthened his feelings of being 
part of a real family again. 

A second drawing by Noel, twelve 
months later, indicated improve- 
ment; and in the third self-portrait 
the psvchiatrist asked him to do a 
vear after that, Noel showed his re- 
habilitation was complete. The pic- 
ture revealed a smiling youngster 
with cheeks the color of apples; be- 
hind him was a big red house; two 
roads led to it and a bright sun 
shone on a happy scene. Today 
Noel's guardians know him to be a 
friendly and affectionate child and a 
good student. This Rosh Hashonah 
Noel is still under JDC care and 
must remain at the home until he is 
graduated from high school. Then 
he'll go out into the world, strong 
and eager to make his mark. 

The Story of Julius Z. 

While the children's are work 
was still on display, a group of Jew- 
ish DP's stood on the platform of 
the Munich railroad station. They 
were "hard core" cases — former tu- 
berculosis patients and their fami- 
lies, waiting for the train that would 
take them to Norway in time to be- 
gin a new vear in a new land. 



WE INVITE YOU TO VISIT OUR SHOW ROOM 
WHEN IN BALTIMORE 




I* Trade Mark Reg. ■ ™ 



16 HOPKINS PLACE 

Catering to Progressive Infants' and Children's Shops 



The Norway-bound DP's in the 
transport were not the first group to 
resettle in Norway; other DP's had 
left last year for the same country. 
Other groups of TB and post-TB 
cases from the DP areas have been 
accepted for resettlement in Sweden 
under a similar scheme worked out 
by JDC and the Swedish Govern- 
ment. JDC meets all costs in con- 
nection with the projects, including 
transportation charges and a lump- 
sum payment to the government 
for each immigrant accepted. 

Among those standing on the 
platform was Julius Z, and by his 
spirited interest in the coming event, 
it was hard to realize that here was 
a man who had lost two families in 
two generations. 

Julius was a boy in Poland when 
his whole family — his parents and 
six brothers and sisters — perished in 
a typhus epidemic following World 
War I. Raised in a Warsaw orphan- 
age, he learned the trade of a me- 
chanic; by the time he was 24, Julius 
was married and the father of a little 
girl. Then Poland fell to the Nazis; 
Julius was thrown into a concentra- 
tion camp and lost contact with his 
family. Returning after the war, he 
found his wife and daughter had 
died in the Warsaw ghetto. Noth- 
ing remained to keep him in Poland; 
he made his way to a DP camp in 
Germany where, in 1946, JDC doc- 
tors recognized serious TB symp- 
toms in him. 

Julius was assigned to a JDC-sup- 
ported sanatorium in Germany 
where he was slowly nursed back to 
health. Rejected for immigration to 
half a dozen countries because of his 
lung condition, he remained in 
Camp Foehrenwald — last remaining 
Jewish DP camp in Germany — until 
a special resettlement plan worked 
out bv JDC and the Norwegian 
Government afforded him an extra- 
ordinary opportunity to pick up his 
life again. 



New Year's Greetings 

AETNA 

SHIRT 
CORPORATION 

SHIRTS— SPORTSWEAR 

I 10 South Paca Street 
Phone PLAZA 4271 
BALTIMORE I, MD. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



The Meaning of Academic Freedom 

By STANLEY A. WOLPERT 

Following is the text of the first prize winning essay in the recent nation- 
wide contest conducted by the Council of Jewish Women. — THE EDITOR. 



... To the teacher, to the scholar 
on the high road of reason leading 
to truth, academic freedom is so- 
'"'lly's green light. It isgnifies, "You 
i$o, you who have been tested and 
tried by your teachers and col- 
leagues, you who have learned 
through arduous study and long 
years of disciplined labor how to use 
honestly and objectively the tools 
of scholarship, the books, the logic, 
the facts of history and the natural 
world, you who have mastered the 
art and science of education, inves- 
tigation and clear thinking, you go 
on unafraid, go as Prometheus went 
— steal more of the fire from Olym- 
pus." And if at the end of his road 
the scholar arrives at conclusions in 
conflict with popular opinion, or 
not in- keeping with the current 
phase of an evolving national pol- 
icy, or inimical to powerful groups 
in society, acdamic freedom means 
that no government or newspaper 
or individual will be permitted to 
force a retraction of those conclu- 
sions, to ban or burn them, to pun- 



ish in vengeance their champion. It 
means that in the world of ideas, 
(Please Turn to Page 109) 




Mrs. Milton L. Anfenger, whose late 
husband served 7 consecutive terms as 
president of the National Jewish Hos- 
pital at Denver, is presented an engraved 
resolution and the gavel Mr. Anfenger 
used, at a ceremony marking dedication 
of a plaque in her husband's memory 
at the pioneer, free, non-sectarian tuber- 
culosis institution. Making the presen- 
tation is NJH President Joseph H. 
Silversmith. 



Best Wishes for a Happy New Year 
JACOB FELDSTEIN JOEL B. SCHWARTZMAN 

MAX FELDSTEIN 

and SONS, Inc. 

113 So. Hanover St., Baltimore, Md. 



Makers of 
TROUSER SPECIALTIES 

SPORTSWEAR 

for Men and Boys 



1 THE SEASON'S GREETINGS | 

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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



19 



FFnai B'rith 5th District Holds Wildacres Institute 



Greater opportunities for the cre- 
ative survival of American Jewry 
exist now than ever before, Dr. Al- 
bert I. Gordon told the Institute of 
Judaism sponsored here by B'nai 
B'rith District No. 5, August 5th- 
9th. At the same time, however, Dr. 
Gordon warned against the general 
weakening of the religious base of 



Jewish life in America and the in- 
creasingly serious problem of inter- 
marriage. Dr. Gordon is the spirit- 
ual leader of Congregation Emanuel, 
of Newton Center, Mass. 

Major theme of this Institute was 
"The American Jewish Commu- 
nity." Besides Dr. Gordon, other 
facultv members who discussed this 




Faculty of the 5th District Institute of Judaism at Wildacres in an informal 
moment: Left to right: Rabbi Albert I. Gordon, Salo Baron, Jacob R. Marcus 
and Philip M. Klutznick. 



theme were Dr. Jacob R. Marcus, of 
Hebrew Union College; Professor 
Salo W. Baron of Columbia Univer- 
sity; and Philip M. Klutznick, Presi- 
dent of B'nai B'rith. The Wildacres 
meeting is one of 10 B'nai B'rith 
Institutes of Judaism being held in 
various parts of the United States 
and Europe this year. 

Citing the narrowing of differ- 
ences among American Jews as one 
of the factors favorable to Jewish 
survival, Dr. Gordon said: 

"More American Jews are think- 
ing, acting and holding to a core of 
values in common .... The growing 
lines of indistinction between Jews 
who call themselves Orthodox, Re- 
form or Conservative is likely to 
make for a healthy unity of purpose 
as contrasted with an unwholesome 
uniformity." 

Dr. Gordon also noted that while 
"present day leadership is often 
weak, improperly motivated and in- 
adequately prepared for its tasks, 
there appears to be an ever-increas- 
ing number of up-and-coming lay- 
men who are beginning to challenge 
their leaders." 




6th Annual Institute of Judaism, Sponsored Jointly by the Nortth Carolina B'nai B'rith Association and the Fifth District 
Grand Lodge of B'nai B'rith, Held at Wildacres, Little Switzerland June 12th-16th. The Faculty Consisted of Dr. Abra- 
ham A. Neuman, Maurice Samuel and Rabbi Maurice L. Zigmond. Above, Collectively: Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Ackerman, 
Louis Baer, Jack Biller, Ellis Berlin, Mr. and Mrs. I. D. Blumenthal, Mrs. Sam Blumenthal, Chester A. Brown, Mrs. 
Seymour Brown, Victor Cooper, Jerome Deitch, Mrs. Bernard Facher, Ellis Farber, Will Farber, Mrs. Leon H. Feldman, 
Mrs. Leopold V. Freudberg, Mr. and Mrs. Sol Greenberg, Isadore Goldman, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Hanchrow, Miss Hannah 
Heller, Isaac Hobowsky, Ben Kingoff, Mrs. Lawrence Koenigsberger, Mr. and Mrs. Sol Levin, Robert Liverman, Meyer 
Mackler, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Mann, Samuel Marks, Miss Elizabeth Mensh, Simon Meyer, Dr. Philip Naumoff, Dr. and 
Mrs. Abraham A. Neuman, Mrs. Sidney Parks, Fred Pearlman, Mrs. Max Pollock, Miss Sylvia Pollow, Mr. and Mrs. Mike 
Rand, Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Roth, Maurice Samuel. Julius Strause, Mrs. Louis N. Valenstein, Maurice Weinstein, Dr. 
Maurice L. Zigmond. 



WHAT WILDACRES 
STANDS FOR 

By JOSEPH H. HANCHROW 

The following is part of a letter which 
Mr. Hanchrow, one of those most ac- 
tively identified with the B'nai B'rith 
Institute of Judaism held at Wildacres 
for the past six years, read at the Sixth 
Annual Institute in June. It is part of a 
letter addressed to Sidney G. Kusworm, 
who is chairman of a special committee 
which Philip Klutznick, National B'nai 
B'rith president, appointed to evaluate 
the work of the Institutes. — THE 
EDITOR. 

I am delighted to learn that you 
are chairman of the special evalua- 
tive committee on Institutes. With 
your indulgence I should like to pre- 
sent my thoughts about Institutes. 

Although I was one of the small 
group of founders, I opposed a State 
B'nai B'rith allocation of $250 for 
our second Institute. I did not think 
it wise to use B'nai B'rith funds to 
subsidize a "vacation" for some 50 
men. How short-sighted I was. How 
happy, now, that our side lost. How 
many dividends that small invest- 
ment has paid. 

For Wildacres is not a "vacation" 
for a few. It is not a "good time," a 
diversion, a passing experience, a 
glorified adult Jewish Sunday 
School, a pious retreat, a miniature 
convention, nor a specialized adult 
camp. It has meant many things 
to many people. I write about the 
reactions of my friends, my wife, 
myself. From the outset a high de- 
gree of scholarship has prevailed. I 
well recall the lengthy debate, 
over four years ago, before the 
N. C. B. B. Executive Committee 
on the issue to permit women to at- 
tend the Institute. The argument 
was offered that the presence of 
women would make the Institute 
"too social." That women might 
detract from the intense atmosphere 
of study and learning. But a major- 
ity felt that men and women were 
equal intellectually, and that those 
whose interests were purely "social," 
whether men or women, would not 
climb the mountain. 

If the sole accomplishment of the 
Institute created an opportunity to 
sit before the great Jewish thinkers 
of our time and to learn, discuss and 
study our heritage, that would have 
been sufficient. If the Institute was 
but the medium for the collective 
expression of Jewish problems, and 
a means to seek their solutions, that 
would have been sufficient. If the 
Institute provided a group of B'nai 



20 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



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B'rith leaders a brief oppotrunity to 
live, work and think together, com- 
paring their respective points of view 
as individuals, members of B'nai 
B'rith, and of the American Jewish 
Community, that would have been 
sufficient. But in addition to all this 
the Institute has rendered a greater 
service. 

Through the knowledge and stim- 
ulation received at the Institute 
many have been assisted in making 
a happier adjustment to life itself. 
Strong inner conflicts have been 
brought into focus and their univer- 
sality explored. For a few, the void 
of religious knowledge existing 
among American Jews is slowly 
being filled. Ideas of unity and re- 
spect for the three wings of our faith 
have been developed as an answer 
to the internecine warfare now 
waged about us. 

And after one leaves the moun- 
tain, the Institute and its inspira- 
tion remain. Through discussions at 
home others gain some of the inspi- 
ration. And through books to which 
one was introduced there is a con- 
stant link with the faculty and the 
great ideas and thoughts presented. 

There is the development of a 
strong vital interest in Judaism and 
a modern religion, a way of life, the 
most satisfying philosophy yet de- 
vised for living with man and God. 

In the community in which I live 
we have had an incorporated con- 
gregation for over 32 years. It was 
organized by observant Orthodox 
Jews. But these men lacked inspira- 
tion. They did not build a house of 
worship. They waited for over 30 
years until a few men, Institute 
alumni, in turn inspired a commu- 
nity. Until a few men learned that 
Orthodox, Conservative and Reform 
Jews could have a satisfying spiritual 
experience together, and could con- 
vince others of this fact. Next mont 
month our Temple will be com- 
pleted. Our 15 families feel great 
pride in it, but it stands as an ad- 
jective of the Institutes potency. 

I know of some homes in which 
a few vcars ago there never had 
been a Jewish book, probably not 
ever a prayer book. Today there are 
prayer books, there are Bibles, there 
are Jewish histories and novels, there 
are Jewish philosophical discourses 
and religious tracts, there are mem- 
berships in the Jewish Publication 
Society and in the American Jewish 
Historical Society, there is great 
participation in B'nai B'rith, in 
Temple or Synagogue, in all places 
of Jewish life, there is greater respect 
for tradition, ■ and dignified observ- 
ance of custom modified to meet 



our present way of life. There is the 
beginning of Jewish knowledge and 
a thirst for more Jewish knowledge. 
And always there is the desire to 
return, again, to the Institute; to 
the feet of the scholars, with the 
color and majesty of the Omnipo- 
tent's frame for one of the most glo- 
rious pulpits ever created. 

The ideal setting of Wildacres is 
not easily duplicated. Every section 
of the country does not have a Dick 
and Madolyn Blumenthal with 
their intense feeling of dedication 
nor the inspired and gifted leader- 
ship of Maurice Weinstein. But 
great thoughts, presented by great 
men, with an inspirational back- 
ground as a catalyst can achieve 
similar results elsewhere. 

Millions of American Jews today 
are hiding from their heritage. They 
are part of the great mass who wor- 
ship at the altar of the twin-headed 
Moloch of cynicism and material- 
ism. No religious group, preaching 
its particular ideology has been able 
to crack the hard polished shell of 
their psuedo-sophistication which 
insulates these people from their 
heritage. 

But laymen, Institute inspired 
laymen, going forth among the peo- 
ple, will daily and continually in- 
itiate thoughts of mutual respect 
and understanding and whet the ap- 
petite for greater knowledge and 
learning. 

I have been active in B'nai B'rith 
for several years. I take greatest 
pride in my work with the Institute 
of Judaism. 

That is what the Institute has 
meant to me, to my friends and 
what I believe it could mean to 
American Jewry. 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



21 



Israel's Economic Policies and Prospects 

By DAVID HOROWITZ 

Mr. Horowitz was formerly Director General of the Treasury and Economic 
Advisor to the Government of Israel. He had been designated Director of the 
new Israel State Bank.— THE EDITOR. 



Five years have passed since the 
establishment of the State of Israel 
and at this juncture a retrospective 
survey of its position and policies 
may serve as a clue for the evalu- 
ation of its future prospects. 

The country is still engaged in a 
difficult struggle for economic sur- 
vival and The Economist (London) 
wonders: What is the "conjuring 
trick whereby international pay- 
ments have been balanced by a 
country that is buying so very much 
more than it sells. The expedients 
adopted are a mystery to the lay- 
man." What is astounding in view 
of the realities of the situation are 
not the strains and stresses, but 
rather the enigma of progress in the 
face of well nigh insuperable diffi- 
culties. 

The establishment of the State 
resulted in far-reaching changes and 
transformations in the political, ter- 
ritorial and demographic spheres: a 
new political entity; new territorial 
frontiers; the Arab exodus; and Jew- 
ish mass immigration. The new 
State had to adopt during the War 
of Liberation, as every state must in 
time of grave emergency, a system 
of managed and controlled econ- 
omy. Its connections with the 
sterling bloc were cut off by the 
Mandatory Government several 
months before the termination of 
the Mandate, and the Arab coun- 
tries proclaimed their economic boy- 
cot of Israel. On the other hand, 
the Government of the United 
States and Jewry all over the world, 
and particularly in America, ex- 
tended generous economic assistance 
to the new State. Israel had to 
assume the responsibility for her 
own balance of payments, a respon- 
sibility which was formerly that of 
the Mandatory Government. All 
economic signs indicate a consider- 
able growth and expansion, in abso- 
lute figures, but the crucial eco- 
nomic problems of the country — 
absorption of immigrants, balance 
of payments, inflation — become 
ever graver and more difficult. 

The greatest and most far-reach- 
ing change occurred in the sphere 
of demographic development. Im- 
migration was unlimited, and politi- 
cal factors such as persecution of 
Jews in several countries and the 
plight of displaced Jews in camps 
in Germany increased the scope of 
immigration on a vast scale. In the 
first four years of the State's exist- 



ence, practically the entire Jew- 
ish populations of various coun- 
tries, such as Yemen, Iraq, Yugo- 
slavia and Bulgaria, were trans- 
ferred to Israel. During this period 
the population of Israel more than 
doubled, and Jewish immigration 
exceeded the total Jewish immigra- 
tion into Palestine during the 
seventy years of Jewish colonization. 
Immigrants who came to Israel after 
the establishment of the State now 
form the majority of the population. 
(Please Turn to Page 24) 




Samuel J. Borowsky, presideni of the 
Histadruth Ivrith of America delivered 
his presidential address at the 36th an- 
niversary convention of the organization 
at Attlaiitic Citty, N. J. 



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The Old Rabbi Looks at the Rubble 

(Continued from Page 6) 



magazine. He and Harry Utterman 
ind Jess Plath came to my study 
that spring afternoon. Utterman 
I'd confirmed in 1926 or '27 — the 
year escapes me — but I remember 
how he forgot his part and had to 
sit down, much to the embarrass- 
ment of his parents. Plath's pic- 
ture was in Time a few months ago. 
His father was wiped out in 1930 
and tried to take an overdose of pills 
and I had to go over to his house 
at one a. m, hurrying through the 
slippery streets half-dead with fa- 
tigue myself, and persuade him that 
he couldn't do this to his family and 
himself. Plath should see that boy 
of his now, ten million dollars and 
a yacht down in the Gulf. 

Well, boys, I said under my 
breath, when they came in, I know 
why you're here and what you want. 
In 1925, your fathers, acting on the 
motion of Abe Yeff, elected me 
rabbi for life, and now you've come 
for that contract. They fussed 
around a little, these youngsters 
whom I had confirmed, and they 
were a little embarrassed about get- 
ting to the point. It's like this, 
rabbi, the times are critical — now 
wait a mintue, when haven't they 
been critical — but never mind the 
interruption; their memories did not 
reach as far back as mine. They 
wanted a man with vigor. They 
were polite and their respect meant 



a lot to me. The sapling Gammel 
had planted back in 1903 was a mas- 
sive maple, but did I need these 
three boys to tell me that its heart 
was stricken? The voice that had 
warned grand kleagles and foreign 
dictators was losing its silvery tone. 
I had no more trade secrets left. I 
couldn't even make them cry at Kol 
Nidre any more. This was the new 
generation. They'd gone to Vassar 
and Dartmouth; they read Proust 
and T. S. Eliot. Milhaud, not Men- 
delssohn, was their favorite com- 
poser . . . 

Of course I gave them my con- 
tract and in return they gave me a 
handsome pension, but then thev 
can afford it. They are oil barons 
and lumber princes; they are doc- 
tors with fashionable clinics; thev 
are skilled engineers who charge one 
hundred and fifty dollars an hour 
for their services. What is five mil- 
lion dollars to them? The price of 
the new tempe is what they save on 
income taxes. They took my con 
tract and put the ax to my temple' 
I preached to three generations from 
that lectern and now it's exposed to 
the open sky! Well, let it be! 

Tomorrow I'll ride out to White 
Creek. The stones are more fa 
miliar there. I'll walk under the wil 
lows and smell the cape jasmines 
again. I'll see the dove of peace 
brooding over that child's grave and 
(Please Turn to Page 64) 



THE COYER 

The picture on the cover is that of Rabbi Bernard Birstein, in the 
pulpit of the Actor's Temple, of which he is the spiritual leader. The 
Temple is located on West 47th Street, near Broadway, in the heart 
of New York's theatrical district. Organized in 1924, Rabbi Birstein 
has served it since its beginning. He is chaplain of Cinema Lodge 
of B'nai B'rith and acts in like capacity for the Variety Clubs of 
America. Since its inception, the Temple has provided spiritual 
gudance for a long list of nationally famous men and women, many 
of them non-Jews. Included are Eddie Cantor, Milton Berle, Oscar 
Levant, Phil Baker, George Jessel, Frank Sinatra, Ed Sullivan, Sophie 
Tucker, Danny Kaye, Hazel Scott, Ted Lewis, Eddie Duchin, Lucy 
Monroe and a host of others. Photo is by Norman Kaphan. 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



23 



To Wildacres 

It is tune to ascend to the mountain heights 
Time to follow the Institute trail, 
And stop in these acres of wilderness — 
Let our higher thoughts prevail. 

Where the depth of the forest is gently topped 
With a lighter, yet brighter hue, 
And we find many colors ainassed right here 
By nature for us to view. 

Where the warmth of the sun, as it shines from above, 
Seems to saturate all through the day, 
Or the chill of the rain when the sky is cloud-cast — 
Even lightning and tunder hold sway; 

Where the mist settles down in a valley below, 
Yet, rolls over the highest hill, 
. . . This is the place where our hearts sing out 
And our minds imbide to their fill. 

Here's a home where all men join 

In a wise and progressive field, 

And we listen intently while scholars disperse 

The endowments our forefathers willed. 

The historical truths of the years long passed 
Are the verities we must proclaim, 
If vision be ours, if we'd find evermore 
The eternal light aflame. 

— Ruth Feldman 



GOING UP? 

"Everything is going up!", Well the rain's still coming down; 
There's no tax on sunshine, or the red and gold and brown 
Of Autumn leaves, or on the snow that makes a mountain crown. 

"Everything is going up!" But the bird songs cost no more; 
No twenty per cent for luxury on the jasmine round the door; 
And moonlight in my gardens inexpensive as before. 

"Everything is going up!" But the price of joy's the same; 
It costs no more to work or sing, or fan the ancient flame 
Of love; and to a comrade's smile we still may stake our claim. 

"Everything is going up! Come, come, what's that you say? 
The things that really matter cost just the same today. 
The broad blue sea, the mountain tops, the trees, the rain, the sky, 
They're tax exempt forever, — oh! lucky you and I." 

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Israel's Economic Policies and Prospects 

(Continued from Page 21) 



This new population differed from 
the Arab population of 750,000 
which left the country in its eco- 
nomic pattern, occupational distri- 
bution, standard of life, as well as in 
nearly all other aspects of economic, 
cultural and social life. It was also 
entirely different from the existing 
Jewish population and within the 
space of a few years, sometimes 
even a few months, it had to change 
its economic, occupational, social 
and cultural structure. 

The new immigrants did not orig- 
inate, as had the earlier immigrants, 
mainly in Europe. The latest comers 
are from the countries of Asia and 
Africa. While in the years 1919- 
1948, out of a Jewish immigration 
of 452,000 some 41,000, or less than 
10 per cent, came from Asia, in the 
vears 1948-1951 the percentage in- 
creased to 35.7 and the absolute 
number to 237,000 out of 684,000. 
Africa was the continent of origin of 
4,000 Jews, less than one per cent 
of those who came to Palestine in 
1919-1948, but from the establish- 
ment of the State till the end of 
1951 that continent's share was 
993,000, or 14 per cent of the whole. 
At the same time the number from 
Europe declined from 377,000 (out 
of 452,000), or some 83 per cent, to 
331,000 (out of 684,000), or 50 per 
cent of the total. The other conti- 
nents still contribute a negligible 
proportion of the immigrants. 

While in the earlier period the 
immigration was to a large extent 
composed of single persons, families 
have been coming in ever increasing 
proportion. The average size of im- 
migrant families rose from 2.9 in 
1948 to 3.7 in 1951. In 1919-1923 
the proportion of single male immi- 
grants was 67.4 per cent; in the 
years 1939-1945 it declined to 51.3 
per cent; and since the establish- 
ment of the State to 34.7 per cent. 
The birth and death rates of oriental 
Jewish communities, in contradis- 
tinction to western Jewish com- 
munities, greatly increased the net 



rate of reproduction of Israel's Jew- 
ish population: from 1.02 in the 
years 1926-1927 and 0.94 in 1928- 
1930, to 1.75 in 1950. In 1951 the 
Jewish population increased by some 
40,000, by reason of an excess of 
births over deaths, and in 1952 natu- 
ral increase for the first time con- 
tributed more to the growth of the 
population than did net immigra- 
tion. 

The age composition of the immi- 
grant population increased the pro- 
portion of non-productive elements 
— either too young or too old to 
contribute effectively to the eco- 
nomic sustenance of the country — 
and the proportion of the gainfully 
occupied population decreased. On 
the other hand, there was a favor- 
able shift in the occupational dis- 
tribution by increased employment 
in agriculture, which rose from 12.6 
per cent of the total number of 
earners in 1947, to 13.9 per cent in 
1951, or in absolute numbers from 
32,000 to 70,000. The geographic 
redistribution of population also re- 
flected a favorable trend: away from 
overcrowded centers to new areas of 
development. Thus, in the years 
1948-1951 the population in Upper 
Galilee increased by 278 per cent, 
and in the Negev by 828 per cent, 
while the areas comprising Tel Aviv 
and Haifa grew by only 89 and 78.6 
per cent respectively. The figures 
are to some extent misleading, how- 
ever, as the basis from which the 
enumeration started was very low 
in Upper Galilee and negligible in 
the Negev. Nevertheless, the trend 
is not insignificant, and the policy 
of diverting the population to the 
countryside and to underdeveloped 
areas has had some success. 

Israel's main economic difficulties 
are the result of the failure of pro- 
duction to expand concurrently and 
at the same pace as the population. 
The one notable exception is agri- 
culture, which has kept pace with 
the increase of population. Despite 
this, imports are still the source of 




OPENING A ROAD IN THE DESERT— An American tractor, imported 
by the Jewish National Fund, is aiding to wiest a new civilization from the 
wilderness. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



25 



some 50 per cent of the foodstuffs 
consumed. The country was de- 
pendent for the supply of the bulk 
of its food on imports from abroad 
in 1947, and in order to become 
more self-sufficient production 
would have had to be expanded 
faster than the population increased, 
a task well nigh impossible within 
such a short period of time. 

The lag of industrial production 
behind the increase of population 
is even more pronounced. Building 
and construction made necessary by 
the exceptionally high rate of immi- 
gration absorbed manpower, build- 
ing materials and capital on a vast 
scale. 450,000 people have already 
been housed in permanent build- 
ings, but over 200,000 are still ac- 
commodated in temporary and in- 
adequate huts in the transition 
centers. The immense building task 
was carried through with an invest- 
ment of about a quarter of a billion 
Israeli pounds. 

The production and national in- 
come of a country in which there 
is immigration on so vast a scale as 
in Israel is dependent on new invest- 
ment for the expansion of its econ- 
omy and of its productive capacity. 
In the face of a task of such magni- 
tude, savings and internal ac- 
cumulation of capital are utterly 
inadequate as a source of financing. 
Imports of capital from abroad for 
investment therefore assumes a de- 
cisive importance. This influx of 
capital is reflected in the adverse 
trade balance of the country. Zion- 
ist and other gift funds, the Inde- 
pendence Loan, grants from the 
United States Government, Export- 
Import Bank loans, private funds, 
the liquidation of foreign assets such 
as sterling balances and foreign se- 
curities held by Israeli residents, all 
contributed to this flow of capital. 




The import of capital from all these 
sources aggregated, during the first 
five years of the State's existence, 
about one billion dollars. 

However, not all this capital 
could be utilized for investment pur- 
poses and a considerable part of it 
was used to transport and maintain 
hundreds of thousands of immi- 
grants who, under the threat to their 
security or in danger of being forever 
trapped in the countries of their 
origin, had to be transferred to Israel 
even though there was no possibility 
of their immediate economic inte- 
gration. This "Operation Rescue 
and Salvation" had to be effected 
with the urgency of a military op- 
eration, but subsequent economic 
integration must necessarilv be a 
gradual and more protracted process, 
dependent on adequate investment 
and the expansion of the capacity 
of production. Thus the mainte- 
nance of a large unintegrated seg- 
ment of the immigrant population 
had to be financed by import of 
capital, and this reduced the volume 
of capital available for investment. 

Investment involves, however, not 
only a quantitative problem of ade- 
quate volume, but also a qualitative 
problem of selectivity and order of 
priorities. The main criterion for 
priority of investment projects must 
be the goal of economic indepen- 
dence. So long as capital for invest- 
ment is in short supply and expan- 
sion of economic facilities is so 
urgently needed, priority has to be 
determined by the effect of every 
(Please Turn to Page 28) 





McCORMICK and CO., Inc. 

Baltimore 2, Maryland 



• THE WORLD'S LARGEST 

• SPICE AND EXTRACT HOUSE 



GOOD LUCK TO YOUR GOOD TASTE 



* coo" 



Fine Meat Products Since 1917 
Joseph McSweeney & Sons, Inc., Richmond, Va. 



Joseph Cherner, national vice president 
of the $25,000,000 campaign for the 
Albert Einstein College of Medicine. 




SCHEDULE 

AUTOMOBILE - PASSENGER 
FERRY SERVICE 

ACROSS CHESAPEAKE BAY 

KIPTOPEKE BEACH, VA. — LITTLE CREEK, VA. 



SOUTHBOUND i.ave Kiptopek. Beach, Va. 

2:00 AM -4:00-6:00-7:00 - 8:00-9:00 
10:00- 10:55-11:50-12:45 PM-1:40 
2:35-3:30-4:25-5:20-6:15-7:10-8:05 
9:00-10:00-11:00-12 Midnight 



5 



MODERN RADAR Crossing time is 1 hour 25 minutes. 
EQUIPPED SHIPS L un{ h Counter Service on all Five Ships. 



NORTHBOUND leave Little Creek, Va. — 
2:00 AM-4:00- 6:00-7:00-8:00-9:00 
10:00-10:55- 11:50-12:45 PM-1:40 
2:35-3:30-4:25-5:20-6:15-7:10-8:05 
9:00-10:00-11:00-12 Midnight 




For information and free map, write-- 

VIRGINIA FERRY CORPORATION 



P. O. Box 120 



NORFOLK, VA. 



26 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 





A Happy New Year 



May It Bring to You and Your Family Health, Happiness, Peace 
and Prosperity, May It See Your Hopes Fulfilled and May 
It Be Rich in the Successful Accomplishment of 
Your Highest Aims 



COCHRANE 

FURNITURE CO., Inc. 



Manufacturers of 



BREAKFAST 
ROOM 



and 



DINETTE 
SUITES 



LINCOLNTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



THOMASVILLE 

UPHOLSTERING CO. 

THOMASVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 




Left Facing 
Overall W 29%"— H 32" 
Inside W 21"— D 22" 



No. 900 

Center 
W 22"— H 32' 
W 22"— D 22" 



Right Facing 
W 29%"— H 32" 
W 32" — D 22" 



Manufacturers of 
High Quality Living Room and Period Furniture 
Duncan Phyfe and Virginia Sofas 
Lawson Sofas and Chairs 
SOFA BEDS 



LIBERTY 
CHAIR CO. 



Manufacturers of 

CHAIRS AND 
DINETTE SUITES 

Liberty, N. C. 



Permanent Exhibits 

NEW YORK FURNITURE EXCHANGE, New York 

AMERICAN FURNITURE MART, Chicago 
SOUTHERN EXPOSITION BUILDING, High Point 




THE CONTINENTAL 
FURNITURE CO. 

Designers and Manufacturers of 

FINE BEDROOM FURNITURE 

SINCE NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE 
HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 

Write for Booklet "To Match Your Dream" — 15c 




REG. TRADE MARK 



Nationally Advertised in Leading Magazines 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



27 



BERNHARDT 

FURNITURE 

COMPANY 



Manufacturers of 

DINING ROOM FURNITURE ? 



LENOIR, NORTH CAROLINA 



JOHNSON'S SPRING COMPANY, Inc. 



Established 1925 




Manufacturers of 

SPRINGS FOR UPHOLSTERED FURNITURE 
MATTRESS INNER SPRING UNITS 

JEFFERSON CITY, TENNESSEE 
Phone 3176 



ATHENS 

TABLE COMPANY 



ESTABLISHED 1906 



Manufacturers of 

LIVING ROOM TABLES 
AND NOVELTIES 

ATHENS, TENNESSEE 



B. F. HUNTLEY 
FURNITURE CO. 




Specializing in Quality 



Bed Room Furniture 



WINSTON-SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA 



28 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



SEE 




SOLD BY OUR DEALERS 



fjTj ) Heritage ^ i ^ mM ^ 



Henredon 




MORGANTON, N. C. — HIGH POINT, N. C. 



Israel's Economic Policies and Prospects 

(Continued from Page 25) 




individual investment project on the 
country's balance of payments. 

Israel has several instruments and 
prerogatives to facilitate direction of 
investment with this object in view. 
Such indirect guidance is supple- 
mented by extensive direct State in- 
vestment through the development 
budget. In the years 1949/50- 
1952/53 the development budget ag- 
gregated IL 3314 million, and in the 
years 1949-1951 the Government 
and Jewish national institutions 
(Jewish Agency, etc.) were respon- 
sible for about half the total volume 
of investment in Israel. The total 
amount invested in Israel during the 
first five years of its existence is 
estimated at about half a billion 
Israeli pounds at current prices, 
which were, of course, very much 
affected and to some extent dis- 
torted, by the process of inflation 
in those years. 

Under the circumstances, the 
State encountered great difficulties 
in balancing its international pay- 
ments in the amount of some one 
and a third billion dollars of visible 
and invisible expenditures in 1948- 
1952. Exports could not be in- 
creased sufficiently as long as the 
increasing population claimed nearly 



all the resources and facilities of 
production to supply its growing 
needs. Furthermore, inflation had 
a most detrimental effect on exports 
by distorting the cost structure. The 
gap was bridged by the import of 
public and private capital. 

An attempt was made to reduce 
consumption, and consequently im- 
ports, through austerity and ration- 
ing. Imports per capita — calculated 
after elimination of price fluctua- 
tions by adopting a uniform 1949 
price standard — dropped from IL 
84.19 in 1949 to IL 67.03 in 1951. 
This policy of reducing consump- 
tion was reinforced by the New 
Economic Policy adopted by the 
Government in February, 1952. 

Since the establishment of the 
State there has been a shift in the 
country's sources of supply. The 
United States became, through its 
great assistance to Israel, the most 
important source of supply and oc- 
cupied the first place in her trade. 
Trade was influenced by various 
trade and payments agreements with 
a number of countries. The boy- 
cott of Israel by the Arab states cut 
off all trade relations with those 
countries. 

The balance of international pay- 



COMMERCIAL CARVING 
COMPANY 

Telephone 802 P. 0. Box 506 

THOMASVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 



Manufacturers of Finished or Unfinished, 

WOOD CARVINGS 
FOR THE FURNITURE INDUSTRY 

SEND DESIGNS OR MODELS 



BRADY FURNITURE CO., Inc. 

RURAL HALL, NORTH CAROLINA 

Manufacturers of Maple Living Room 
and Sun Parlor Suites 
and Chairs 



New York Show Rooms 
PARAMOUNT FURNITURE INDUSTRIES 
New York Furniture Exchange, New York, N. Y. 



Chicago Show Room 
PARAMOUNT FURNITURE INDUSTRIES, Inc. 
813-814 American Furniture Mart Building 



RAMSEUR FURNITURE CO. 

RAMSEUR, NORTH CAROLINA 

Manufacturers of Fine Quality 
Bedroom Furniture 
Since 1905 

General Offices and Showrooms 
RAMSEUR FURNITURE COMPANY OF NEW YORK 



r = AMERICAN FURNITURE MART = 

j^j S Chicago, III. — Space 814 ^ 

E E NEW YORK FURNITURE EXCHANGE E 

= = 206 Lexington Ave., New York 16, N. Y. — Space 313 = 

E E SOUTHERN FURNITURE EXPOSITION BUILDING E 

= E High Point, N. C— Third Floor | 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



29 



merits is closely connected with and 
very much influenced by the in- 
ternal financial developments of the 
State. 

Israel's budget falls into three 
main categories: a) the ordinary 
budget, covering administration and 
services; b) the defense budget, part 
of which is secret; and c) the de- 
velopment budget. In the year May 
15, 1948— March 31, 1949, the ordi- 
nary budget was authorized at IL 
16,738,000, and that year there was 
no development budget. In 1949/50 
the ordinary budget amounted to 
IL 42,405,000 and the development 
budget to IL 49,100,000. In 1950/51 
the ordinary budget was IL 63,600,- 
000, and the development budget 
IL 65,000,000; in 1951/52 the ordi- 
nary budget was IL 113,600,000, and 
the development budget IL 85,000,- 
000; in 1952/53 the ordinary budget 
was IL 168,500,000, and 'the de- 
velopment budget IL 115,000,000. 
An ever increasing proportion of the 
defense budget has been included 
in the ordinary published estimates. 

The sources of Government reve- 
nue are: taxes, public loans, issue of 
treasury and land bills, foreign loans, 
and grants. Since the establishment 
of the State the share of direct taxes 




Morris Alexander, prominent Chicago 
attorney and civic leader, who has been 
named chairman of the new B'nai 
B'rith Israel Committee. A Past Presi- 
dent of the Chicago B'nai B'rith Coun- 
cil. Alexander and his committee will 
have the task of initiating, supervising 
and coordinating all B'nai B'rith activi- 
ties on behalf of Israel. 



in the total revenue has increased, 
and Israel now occupies a middle 
position between states with a great 
preponderance of direct taxes as 
sources of revenue, and states with a 
large share of indirect taxation. 

Financing by expansion of credit 
of course augmented the total sup- 
ply of money to the public (currency 
in circulation and deposits): from 
IL 164 million at the end of 1949 
to IL 271 million at the end of 1952. 
Such monetary expansion naturally 
caused increased inflationary pres- 
sure on the limited supply of goods. 
The vast immigration, the defense 
budget and extensive investment 
reinforced the inflationary trend. 
Monetary expansion was linked with 
a similar development in banking 
credit to the public. The inflation 
resulting from these developments 
exerted an adverse influence on ex- 
ports, import of captial and produc- 
tivity, and caused an increase in 
consumption and waste of resources. 

These conditions were subjected 
to a radical change with the intro- 
duction of the New Economic 
Policy on February 13, 1952. The 
main objectives of this policy — dis- 
inflation and economic consolida- 
tion — had a profound effect on the 
economy of the country. The issue 
of treasury and land bills had already 
been stopped in October 1951, and 
in 1952 all the budgets were bal- 
anced by actual revenue. The real 
value and purchasing power of the 
currency in circulation and of de- 
posits were contracted by the intro- 
duction of three rates of exchange 
which put a more realistic valuation 
on the Israeli pound; credits were 
restricted; a compulsory loan was 
raised at the rate of 10 per cent of 
all deposits and currency in circu- 
lation. Inflation was reversed and 
increases of wages were made con- 
ditional on a rise in productivity. 
However, partial adjustment of 
wages to the rising cost of living 
remained in force. Real incomes 
were considerably reduced. The se- 



CALYPSO VENEER 
COMPANY 



Manufacturers of 
FURNITURE PANELS 
Dealers in Lumber 



Calypso, N. C. 



VWAVUVWWWVWSi 



BILTWELL 
CHAIR & FURNITURE 
COMPANY, Inc. 

"True To Its Name Since 1925" 

Manufacturers of 

DINETTE and BREAKFAST SUITES 
and SCHOOL CHAIRS 

DENTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



BLOWING ROCK FURNITURE CO. 




LENOIR, NORTH CAROLINA 






Manufacturers 






Specializing in Quality 






FURNITURE 






Factories 






LENOIR and STATESVILLE, N. C. 





We Extend the Season's Greetings on Rosh Hashonah. It Is Our Sincere Wish That It Be Followed by 

Happiness and Prosperity in the New Year 




THOMASVILLE CHAIR COMPANY 

FINCH FURNITURE COMPANY 



THOMASVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 



30 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




BUILTRIGHT CHAIR COMPANY 



Manufacturers of 
JUVENILE AND ADULT SIZE CHAIRS WITH THE ORIGINAL 
DOUBLE SAG SLAT SEATS 
STATESVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 



Revolving Television Tables 




No. 76-20 TV Table 22" x 24" H. 24" 
Seng Ball Bearing Fixture 

Lincolnton Cabinet Company 

Manufacturers of 
OCCASIONAL FURNITURE 

Phone 598-J LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



lective direction of credits to pro- 
ductive enterprise was initiated. The 
rise in prices caused by the new 
rates of exchange is being partly 
compensated by cost-of-living allow- 
ances linked to the cost-of-living in- 
dex. However, there is a time lag 
in this adjustment, and only a part 
— and a relatively decreasing part — 
of wages is being compensated by 
cost-of-living allowances. Thus the 
gap between the purchasing power 
at the disposal of the public and 
the quantity of goods at prevailing 
prices has been narrowed, and the 
floating purchasing power bidding 
for a limited quantity of commodi- 
ties consequently deflated. A simi- 
lar attack on inflation by an increase 
of prices with a view to achieving 
a new equilibrium between incomes, 
on the one hand, and production 
and imports, on the other hand, was 
successfully tried in many European 
countries after the second World 
War and led to rapid disinflation. 

The results of the New Economic 
Policy were reflected in the eco- 
nomic life of the country with a 
time lag of some six months. The 
first result was a sharp increase in 
the cost of living; the cost-of-living 
index which stood at 113 (Septem- 
ber 1951—100) in January 1952, 
just before the New Economic 
Policy was initiated, rose to 120 in 
February, 144 in April, 157 in June, 
and 178 in December. Wages and 
other income lagged behind the in- 
crease in prices. In contradistinc- 
tion to the preceding period, short- 
age of money and illiquidity became 
the most pronounced features of 
the economic situation. The con- 
stant decline in the value of Israeli 
currencv has been arrested. 

On the other hand, unemploy- 
ment spread and reached the num- 
ber of nearly 20,000. Development, 
investment and economic activity 
are handicapped by illiquidity and 
a shortage of funds in Israeli cur- 
rency. The balance of payment 
difficulties still persist. This is the 
price of disinflation and of recovery 
from an unhealthy inflationary con- 
dition. 



The salient features of the present 
economic situation, as determined 
by the New Economic Policy, are 
the following: 

1. A trend toward economic con- 
solidation. 

2. Reduction of real incomes. 

3. Marked increase of prices. 

4. More stable currency. 

5. Disinflation, with all its con- 
comitants of illiquidity, short- 
age of funds, and restricted 
credit. 

6. Readjustment of the cost of 
production through the new 
rates of exchange to more reas- 
onable standards, if measured 
in international money terms. 

7. Difficulties in balancing inter- 
national payments. 

8. The tendency of Government 
to improve the trade balance 
by a reduction in imports on 
the one hand, and by promo- 
tion of exports on the other 
hand. 

There are few differences of 
opinion in Israel as to the economic 



Greetings and 
Best Wishes 
for the 
Holidays 

Fogle 
Furniture 
Co. 

Incorporated 
Manufacturers of 

Fine Furniture 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



HIGH POINT BENDING 
AND CHAIR CO. 

Manufacturers of 

OFFICE CHAIRS — SCHOOL CHAIRS 

SILER CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 



STOUT CHAIR COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 
Manufacturers of 

CHAIRS 
for the Office, Home and School 

LIBERTY, NORTH CAROLINA 



Selling Agents: JOSEPH WALLACE, Pennsylvania Pier 49, New York. N. Y. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



31 



objectives to be pursued. This unity 
of purpose is in itself a factor con- 
ducive to the effort to reach eco- 
nomic equilibrium within a reason- 
able period of time. The fact that 
some of the investments made in 
the first period of the State's exist- 
ence should soon reach fruition is 
another favorable factor. The most 
difficult of the economic objectives 
is closing the gap between imports 
and exports. The following steps 
are being taken in this direction: 

1. Increase of citrus exports by 
the rehabilitation of existing 
groves and the planting of new 
groves. 

2. Export of mineral produce, 
mainly potash from the Dead 
Sea, and phosphates and pos- 
sibly copper from the Negev. 

3. Export of the produce of proc- 
cessing industries (diamonds, 
textiles). 

4. Reduction of imports by in- 
creased production for the 
local market, particularly in 
agriculture (foodstuffs). 

5. Reduction of imports by low- 
ering the standard of life and 
consumption. 

The decrease in the prices of 
commodities on the world market 
should improve the "terms of trade" 
for Israel, which is and will remain 
for some time to come mainly a 
buying country. 

The difficulty of obtaining capital 
equipment may be alleviated to a 
certain extent by supplies from 
Germany on the basis of the repara- 
tions agreement. Thus a fillip will 
now be given to basic economic 
development. Plans so far worked 
out provide for utilization of repara- 
tion funds mainly for expansion of 



immigration, electricity, transport 
and basic industries. 

Even more important, however, 
are the subjective changes in the 
economic climate caused by the 
New Economic Policy: balancing 
of the budgets; disinflation; greater 
readiness to accept reduced stan- 
dards of consumption; the general 
tendency of consolidation and sta- 
bilization. 

The "dismal science" of eco- 
nomics is stronger in analysis than 
in forecast, but in spite of all the 
strains and stresses of the past 
and the tremendous difficulties still 
ahead, there is hope that Israel will 
make her way, slowly but steadily, 
on the narrow and tortuous path 
towards economic independence in 
the future. 



Best Wishes to Our Many Friends 
in Their Holiday Season 




One ot the most romantic stories in 
literature is recalled in the publication 
of a portrait of Rebecca Gratz on the 
front cover of the June 1953 issue of 
the American Jewish Archives magazine. 
Miss Gratz, a distinguished Jewess of 
Philadelphia in the nineteenth century, 
is believed by many authorities to be 
the person who inspired the heroic 
character of Sir Walter Scott's "Re- 
becca," in "Ivanhoe," a novel now 
being shown in movie-form by Metro- 
Gold wyn-Mayer. 



I IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIL 

Burkart-Schier 
Chemical Co. 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 
nashville knoxville 



INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS 
TEXTILE SPECIALTIES 

Manufacturing Chemists 
For the Textile Industry 

PENETRANTS DETERGENTS SOFTENERS 

FINISHES 

I i ill i 1 1 ■ ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i : i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 b • c j 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 




The Burris "BEAU-SIESTA" Reclining — No. 300 





SUPIR CUSHIONING 



MANUFACTURING Wgp^V COMPANY, INC, 

OF LINCOLNTON ^Rf^ NORTH CAROLINA 

Makers of the LINCOLN LOUNGERS • THE FAIRSEX CHAIR and the FAMOUS COMFORT ROCKERS 

SAM REINER — 206 Lexington Avenue, New York City 

iiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

BERRY & DECKER 

TRANSFER 

"Dependable Service" 

Insured Motor Freight Service 
HILDEBRAN, NORTH CAROLINA 

To and From 

The Carolinas — The Virginias — Maryland — New York 
New Jersey — Ohio — Pennsylvania — Indiana — Illinois 
illlllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



HOLDER BROS. 

MANUFACTURING CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Breakfast Room Furniture and Dinette Sets 
FIVE-DRAWER CHEST WITH METAL PULLS 
Made of Southern Hardwoods 



^ J. H. BOONE 
Greensboro, N. C. 



Sales Representatives 

H. G. PASCHAL 
Virginia 

Office and Plant 
KERNERSVILLE, N. C. 



LEONARD WILSON 
South Carolina 



32 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



Our Best Wishes to Our Many Friends tor a 




CHADBOURN VENEER COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 

Southern Hardwood and Single Ply Veneer 

CHADBOURN, NORTH CAROLINA 



GILREATH 
Accent TABLES 

Walnut Wood Carving Co. 



P. O. BOX 384 



PHONE 92 



MORRISTOWN, TENNESSEE 



HERMAN-SIPE & COMPANY, INC. ? 

. . . General Contracfors . . . 
Building Material 
CONOVER, N. C. 




. M. BARGER LUMBER COMPANY 



TELEPHONE 5226 Wholesale Lumbermen STATESVILLE, N. C. 



1953 ATLANTIC RURAL EXPOSITION 

By R. O. GLOVER, Executive Vice-President 



The thousands of patrons that 
will throng the 437-acre fairgrounds 
of the Atlantic Rural Exposition, 
the great State Fair of Virginia in 
Richmond September 25-October 3, 
will have a wealth of things to see 
and do that will make every minute 
a memorable event. 

Those interested in livestock will 
see one of the largest and best shows 
in the East. In the beef cattle 
breeds there will be outstanding en- 
tries in Hereford, Angus and Short- 
horn classes. In the dairy breeds 
some of the best Guernsey, Jersev 
and Holstein stock will be on ex- 
hibit. Early entries indicate that 
last year's 328 animals in the beef 
cattle and 419 in dairy cattle will be 
topped this year. Judges selected 
are Don L. Good of Kansas; T. A. 
Edwards of Canada; Hilton Boyn- 
ton of New Hampshire; and A. E. 
Thomson of Illinois. The Grand 
Champion and Reserve Champion 
in each class will be paraded as a 
feature of Governor's Dav on Octo- 
ber 2. 

About 150 sheep and over 300 
swine will swell the livestock popu- 
lation as well as over 500 rabbits of 
all sizes and breeds from the "Tiny 
Easter Bunny" to the 30-pound 
American Giant. Combine the ani- 
mals in the Junior Division, dis- 



played by 4-H and FFA, and the 
total is expected to exceed 1,500. 

About 12 acres will be needed to 
display and demonstrate the $1,500,- 
000 in farm equipment that will 
consist of tractors, cultivators, 
balers, combines, harvesters, chain 
saws and every other type of equip- 
ment used in the East. Fair patrons 
will be given the opportunity to test 
the equipment on the grounds. All 
the leading manufacturers will be 
represented. 

The greatly expanded Women's 
Department will be an outstanding 
feature of the 1953 Fair with hun- 
dreds of articles of fine needlework, 
canned goods, weaving, baking and 
all kinds of handicraft by FFA and 
4-H girls. 

The Agriculture Department will 
offer displays of grains, vegetables, 
apples, feedstuffs and tobacco as 
well as many other items. 

The State of Virginia building of- 
fers vivid displays, pictures, charts 
and graphs as well as demonstra- 
tions to show the work of the vari- 
ous State Departments and how 
they serve the people of Virginia. 

Numerous special events are de- 
signed to capture the attention of 
all segments of the population such 
as: Jousting Tournament, Judging 
Team Contest, Beauty Contest, 4-H 
(Please Turn to Page 113) 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes 

NASH AUTOMATIC 
SPRINKLER COMPANY 

— Automatic Fire Protection — 

HEATING — PLUMBING — POWER PIPING 

Office & Fabricating Plant 387 W. Harden St. Phone 6-2983 
L. W. Nash, Owner 
GRAHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 




MANUFACTURERS AMD BEVELERS OF HIGH GRADE 



a M 



miummms m**' 






;>;./■■. 



LENOIR, NORTH CAROLINA 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



EMPIRE 

FURNITURE 

CORPORATION 



Manufacturers of 
BED ROOM — LIVING ROOM 

and 

DINING ROOM 

FURNITURE 

JOHNSON CITY, TENNESSEE 



No. 160 Chair, W 32" D 22" H 30" — No. 161 Left Facing, 
W49" D22" H30" — No. 162 Right Facing, W 49" D 22" H 30" 

New! Better! 
FURNITURE BY 
RELIABLE 

Manufacturers of 

Sectional Sofas, Living Room Suites and Sofa Beds, 
and Club Chairs 

RELIABLE 

MANUFACTURING CO. 



PERMANENT EXHIBIT 
207 S. Main Street, High Point, N. C. 
Adjoining Southern Furniture Exposition Bldg. 




HIGH POINT 
North Carolina 



33 



IDEAL 
CHAIR COMPANY 



Incorporaied 
LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



Manufacturers of 

BEDROOM SUITES 
DINETTE SUITES 
POSTER BEDS 

Permanent Show Rooms 
New York Furniture Exchange 
Southern Exposition Building — High Point, N. C. 



MARSH 
FURNITURE 
COMPANY 



Manufacturers 



'Marsh" Kitchen Cabinets 



HIGH POINT, N. C. 



34 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



Kincaid Furniture Co., Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

The World's Finest Cedar Furniture 

j HUDSON, NORTH CAROLINA 

j Displays 

SOUTHERN AMERICAN 

[ FURNITURE NEW YORK ARMORY FURNITURE 

[ EXPOSITION BLDG. New York MART 

10th Floor Space 308 

High Point, N. C. Chicago, III. 



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MAXWELL ROYAL CHAIR CO., Inc. 



Manufacturers of 
LIVING ROOM FURNITURE 



PHONE 3179 



HICKORY, N. C. 



HaiI!nilllllllllll[liil!l!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEMlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



HY-LAN 
FURNITURE CO., Inc. 




Dining and Bedroom Furniture 



HICKORY, NORTH CAROLINA 



HICKORY CHAIR CO. 



Makers of 

CHAIRS 

— and — 

UPHOLSTERED FURNITURE 



HICKORY, NORTH CAROLINA 



GROSSINGER'S-- A JEWISH PARADISE 

By HARRY BARTON 

The Borscht Circuit is famed in song and story. Grossinger's Hotel and 
Country Club is perhaps the best known of the many resorts in this area. 
Danny Kaye, as well as many other famous stars of stage, screen and television, 
received his start there. Mr. Borton, one of our readers herewith expresses 
his delight with with his experiences at the well-known resort. — THE EDITOR. 



About to sign up a reservation at 
Atlantic City, we decided to change 
and go to the Catskill Mountains, 
what made us do it, I do not know 
but it was a lucky day and long to 
be remembered. 

After some correspondence, we 
received a reservation for six weeks 
later at the Grossinger's Hotel and 
Country Club. 

We found out, that if one just 
mentions the name Grossinger, that 
a charm and sparkle glitters one's 
eyes, which means that you are one 
of the lucky souls to enjoy a vaca- 
tion there. In a Jewish paradise and 
true it is, as we sure found out to 
our great joy and amazement. 

It is rich, so rich in fact, that 
one week is all anyone would need 
to get well-in-mind, body and soul. 
I say soul because the place domi- 
nates in love. 

Everyone seems to have left their 
cares outside and entered the Gar- 
den of Eden, to respect the Jewish- 
ness within. To feel at home with 
our own kind, with love of the beau- 
tiful gardens. 

Picturesque buildings and cot- 



tages, most beautiful pool and 
the sparkling clear greenish water 
within. The scenerv of the coun- 
tryside makes you seem to be in a 
dream and when you get to the lav- 
ish and grandest dining room filled 
to capacity with 99 9/10 per cent 
Jews all happy and eager to eat of 
the finest food in America or 
Europe or any where with a flavor 
that reminds you of Grandmother's 
yet modern and served up so lavish 
in quantities, no limit, eat and 
order as many portions as you like. 
You feel that you are really one of 
the lucky ones and even pinch your- 
self to see if you are in a dream. 

Our first elation was the drive 
from New York City to Newburgh 
on the West Side of the Hudson 
River. The mountain sides, the 
quaint roads and side roads and old 
homes. 

The Scenery. We stopped on top 
of one mountain to look down on 
West Point Military Academy and 
the Hudson River. We were in the 
clouds. 

In and around Newburgh were 
many Italian hotels catering to their 



ISRAEL 


¥j fill 






FOR A BIG NEW YEAR FOR ISRAEL 


BONDS 


; '•:',>• 



You con gel a Prospeclut ond buy your Bond a! Americon Financial and Development Corporation for Israel 

258 Boush Street 
NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 



TROUTMAN 

CHAIR COMPANY 



Manufacturers of 
CHAIRS 



TROUTMAN, N. C. 



KING 
VENEER 
CO. 

INCORPORATED 
Manufacturers of 
ROTARY CUT 
POPLAR and GUM 
VENEER 

Thin Panels 
FLORENCE, S. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



3£ 



peoples who come out for rest and 
recreation. However, when we 
drove up above Newburgh on Route 
17 and passed manv large and small 
hotels, motor courts, small summer 
cottages, etc. and we saw hundreds 
— nav thousands of Jews every- 
where, mostly the poorer ones, sit- 
ting under shady trees on porches, 
walking along the roadside, etc. 
Then is when I felt I was in 
Heaven, Jews everywhere rich and 
poor, all out for rest and good 
health. God bless them all. Hard 
working people gone on their vaca- 
tions to rest and cool off in the 
mountains and cool off it was. We 
had 100° to 103° weather in Rich- 
mond when I left and every night 
I spent at Grossinger's we covered 
with two wool blankets and even 
had to close the windows one night, 
it was so cold. 

Thrill after thrill, we drove to the 
small town of Monticello and what 
did we see, a 95 f A Jewish small city, 
drug stores, department stores, fruit 
stores, grocery and delicatessen. 
Butchers with Koser signs, a Jewish 
Paradise, and for miles and miles all 
through the countryside more and 
more hotels, cottages, etc., with fa- 
miliar names like Fleishman, Cohen, 
Levine, Gobropsy, Papoloff, etc. 
Really and truly a Jewish Heaven. 



Later we found out that thou- 
sands live there year 'round and 
have all types of business. The won- 
derful fruit stores you sec in New 
York City or up State cannot be du- 
plicated anywhere. 8he quality and 
variety of fruits and vegetables are 
tops and yet prices reasonable. 

Thousands of people rent one or 
more rooms and keep house and 
drive in to buv their supplies dur- 
ing the week. I drove around 
through Monticello and Liberty, an- 
other small town and even saw Jew- 
ish newspapers on the stands. 
Kosher butcher stores everywhere 
(Please Turn to Page 94) 



THE 

BERKLINE CORPORATION 

Manufacturers of 

FINE UPHOLSTERED FURNITURE 

MORRISTOWN — TENNESSEE 




Philip Bernstein of Forest Hills, Long 
Island, Associate Director of the Coun- 
cil of Jewish Federations and Welfare 
Funds, was elected President of the 
National Conference of Jewish Com- 
munal Service for 1953-1954. 



LENOIR WOOD FINISHING CO., Inc. 

LENOIR, N. C. 



Manufacturers of 

WOOD FINISHES — Lacquers, varnishes, sealers, fillers and 
stains. 

METAL FINISHES — Wash Primers, red lead vinyl coatings and 
vinyl-alkyd topcoats. Saran tank coatings. Complete systems for 
new and better finishes. 

FABRIC FINISHES — Vinyl coatings, adhesives and printing inks. 



UJA Brings Another Family a Happier New Year in Israel 




5714 is bound to be a better year than the last for 
these newly arrived immigrants in Israel. They are 
refugees from a vicious outburst of anti-Semitism that 
swept through the Iron Curtain countries during late 
fall and earlv winter. They were cared for at an emer- 
gencv shelter set up by the Joint Distribution Com- 
mittee, one of the three constituent agencies of the 
United Jewish Appeal. Now, thanks to the contribu- 
tions American Jewrv has made to the United Jewish 
Appeal they will have the opportunity to pick up the 
threads of their lives once more. But much still re- 
mains to be done until they can become self-sufficient 
citizens. UJA funds, in addition to JDC, support the 
programs of the United Israel Appeal and the United 
Service for New Americans. 



THIS SPACE CONTRIBUTED BY A LEADING HIGH POINT MANUFACTURER 



36 




Mojud 
Co., Inc. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Sales Offices 
385 Fifth Avenue 

New York, N. Y. 



THE MERCHANDISE 
MART 

Chicago, III. 



© 1141, TRADE MARK RES. MOJUD HOSIERY CO.. IRC H.T.C, 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



CAROL-MAY 
FINISHING CO. 

Incorporated 

Full Fashioned Hosiery Finishers 
QUALITY CONTROL 

plus 

UNEXCELLED FINISHING 
Specializing in 

15 and 20 Denier Nylon 

Backed by thirty years of practical experience, we work in 
close cooperation with the hosiery industry. This experi- 
ence, combined with the latest technological develop- 
ments, enables the manufacturer to gain and hold the 
consumer's goodwill, to keep abreast with the newest 
improvements, and to meet successfully the exacting 
demands of a buyer's market. 

CONCORD, NORTH CAROLINA 



iiiiinii 

t 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 

GEORGE BLANKSTEIN 
COMPANY 

Hosiery 

for MEN, BOYS and MISSES 



330 Fifth Avenue 
New York I, N. Y. 
Suite 1303-1304 
Phone: LOngacre 5-3828-29 

Sales Directors tor 

Blackstone Hosiery Mills, Inc. 
Thomasville Hosiery Mills, Inc. 

THOMASVILLE, N. C. 



1 




;i s 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 e i 1 1 i a 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 j 1 1 1 1 e 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 E B j t. . 3 1 D 



raj 

MOTOR \JjO[H FREIGHT 




PROGRESSIVE TRANSPORTATION 
SINCE 1930 

General Office: North Main Street — Phone 3757 
HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 



TERMINALS 

ATLANTA, GA. 

Main 4383 
AUGUSTA, GA. 

2- 7159 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

3- 8863 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 

2-8677 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 

2-1119 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 

2-6981 
HIGH POINT, N. C. 

4503 

SPARTANBURG, S. C. 

7865 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 
9974 




The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



3 



7 



PLAIN TALK 

By AL SEGAL 



SURVEY AT 70 

The days this is being written is 
this Mr. Segal's birthday. He hasn't 
been saying much about it but a lot 
of people have discovered the num- 
ber of his years and have been shout- 
ing happy birthday greetings. 

Segal is painfully mindful of what 
the Book of Psalms says about him 
and all others of his years: "The 
days of our years are three score 
years and ten; and if by reason of 
strength they be fourscore years, yet 
is their strength labor and sorrow; 
for it is soon cut off and we fly 
away." 

The Psalmist seems to suggest 
that Segal is about through at three 
score and ten. Three score and ten 
is, of Psalms and tradition, the full 
span of life but Segal is disputing 
the Psalmist: "Mr. Psalmist, it can't 
be. You should be revising the mor- 
tality figures. See this young man, 
me, Segal, who is said to be 70, 
which he doesn't even nearly look. 
Observe, Mr. Psalmist, this Segal 
writing his column on this his 70th 
birthday in his young fresh way, as 
of 30 years ago. See his fingers danc- 
ing on the typewriter keys." 

Segal may be kidding himself, 
yet he seems to be sustained by cer- 
tain facts: His good humor that still 
can laugh at people, including him- 
self. So he says: Maybe it isn't true 
that I am 70. Some confusion of the 
calendar, doubtless. Iammorelikc 50. 

Yet, as a reporter, who through 
all these years, has tried to be accu- 
rate, he couldn't denv his vital sta- 



tistics and has to accept age 70, 
after all. He comforts himself with 
the invidious thought that he is 
about the only columnist who ever 
arrived intact at 70, as far as he 
knew. 




ALFRED SEGAL 

So, making the best of the whole 
thing, he decides to use his birthday 
for columnar purposes. Yes, he says, 
he as a Jewish columnist should, on 
his 70th birthdav, survey himself as 
a Jew. It's a fitting moment for that. 

The main question of such a sur- 
vey is: What does being a Jew mean 
to him at 70? So Segal inspects him- 
self carefully and discovers that be- 
ing a Jew doesn't mean the same 
thing it meant to his father when 
he arrived at the age of 70. 

Segal's father, who died at 97 last 
January, became more Orthodox as 
he advanced into ripe years. He 
wrapped the folds of tradition 
around him tightly. He made a 
sharp separation between himself 
and people of other religions, even 



Dura-Tred Hosiery Co. 



BURLINGTON, N. C. 



BROWN'S HOSIERY MILLS, INC. 

Manufacturers of 
WELBILT and BROWN'S of BURLINGTON 
Infant's, Children's and Men's Hose 

Sell Direct and Through Agents 
BURLINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIillilimSIHHllilllililiiSlliiSiiSE 

DALLAS 
Hosiery Mills 

INCORPORATED 

Manufacturers of 

Seamless Hosiery 
Dallette Brand Hose 

DALLAS, GEORGIA 
iliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



PICKETT HOSIERY MILLS 

INCORPORATED 



Manufacturers of 



Fine Seamless Hosiery 



BURLINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



HALIFAX COUNTY 
HOSIERY MILLS 

Manufacturers of 

Children's and Misses' 
HOSIERY 

SCOTLAND NECK, NORTH CAROLINA 
New York Office — Empire State Building ^ 

miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiy 

= Our Sincere Good Wishes to all of Our Jewish Friends S 
E for a Happy and Prosperous New Year = 



i — 

j E 

j = 

i = 

i = 

i = 

j E P. O. Box 548 

i i 



Koury Hosiery Co. 



Manufacturers and Converters 



Telephone 6-0245 E 



I E 

1 E 

i = 



BURLINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



119 Ill Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Illlllllllllllll 



38 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



THE ROBBINS KNITTING COMPANY 




Manufacturers of Fine Hosiery 

SPRUCE PINE, NORTH CAROLINA 



A. -1. A A , 



A A A A A A A . 



NELLY BEE 
PRODUCTS 

NELLY BEE 
WEAVING LOOMS 

HICKORY, N. C. 



Manufacturers of 

INFANTS' 
• CHILDREN'S 

• and MISSES' HOSIERY 

KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 



Ashe Hosiery Mills 



»*<M 



SILVER KNIT HOSIERY MILLS 




INCORPORATED 






Manufacturers of 






FINE HOSIERY 






HIGH POINT, N. C. 





between himself and Reform Jews. 
His poignant regret was this son 
sought God in a Reform temple, 
where, the father was quite sure, 
God would never go. 

Not that he didn't proudly re- 
spect this younger Segal who was 
his son. . . "You would be all right 
all the way if only you were a good 
Jew," he said. His old years were a 
preparation for his place in Gan 
Eden, Paradise, that is, which he 
was sure, receives the righteous. 

This younger Segal at 70 finds 
himself not following the straight 
path of his Orthodox father; though, 
in his own way, he doesn't feel less 
Jewish than his father did. 

Concerning Segal's religion, I re- 
member what he wrote recently in 
our local daily press for which he 
produces a column. It was around 
the time of Easter and in that con- 
nection the newspaper was printing 
a series titled, "This I Believe." 
And Segal wrote: 

"This I believe: My religious be- 
lief is all in three verses of the Old 
Testament and the New. 

"The three verses of my belief: 

"From Leviticus: "Thou shalt love 
thy neighbors as thyself.' 

"From the Sermon on the Mount 
where Jesus stood: 'Whatsoever ye 
would that men do unto you, do ye 
also unto them'. . . (This is the 
Golden Rule.) 

"From the Hebrew prophet Mi- 
cah: 'What doth the Lord thy God 
require of thee but to do justly, to 
love mercy and to walk humbly with 
thy God.' " 

This is all of Segal's religion at 
age 70. His father would say it's 
pretty good, except for Jesus' words 
being in it, but he would add: "You 
should also be thinking of getting 



ready for the reward that is of para- 
dise. A man of 70 should be think- 
ing of that. . .And do vou keep a 
kosher house?" 

This Segal at 70 has no concept of 
heaven in the skies. He does desire 
a heaven on earth, though. He feels 
sure that heaven can be established 
here if human beings would only 
behave human. If God has any spe- 
cial reward for special people it may 
be for those who have tried to help 
build heaven here. 

As a Jew, Segal doesn't feel that 
he is somebody different, a character 
separate from the run of all the peo- 
ples. He likes to believe that his is 
one of the many religions, all going 
in the same direction, and mayDe 
some dav the}' will all be getting 
together on the mountaintop and 
know each other as brethren. 

On account of these ideas, Segal, 
at 70, feels he is briskly on the 
march of human progress, not a guy 
left behind in the chimney corner. 
Having made this public confession 
of ripe years, he hopes the readers 
will forgive him for being 70. Only 
the other day he heard about the 
embarrassment of our local dental 
society which for several years has 
been giving testimonial dinners for 
dentists who have been on the job 
all of 50 years; their names and pic- 
tures are printed in the papers. 

This vear, old dentists protested: 
Thev didn't care to be publicized 
that way. By such publicity other 
old dentists have been losing pa- 
tients; people didn't want their teeth 
pulled bv quavering, ancient hands. 

Segal hopes the readers of this 
column will graciously overlook his 
being 70. Anyway, to read this col- 
umn is not like having their teeth 
pulled. 



I = 

i = 
i § 
i = 



1 " 'GRAND VIEW HOSIERY 1 

and S 

'VAL-U-FUL' HOSIERY I 

| CHAINS, WHOLESALERS and ■§ 

= LARGE RETAILERS = 

I GRAND VIEW HOSIERY CO. I 

= NEWTON, NORTH CAROLINA = 
^llliiinS19illliigEIH!ilillillllllllliillllllllllllilllilS!illl!llflll!llllilllll!!!llliy!SS!ll!;!Ee!ir£ 

| Medlin Hosiery Mills, Inc. | 

E Manufacturers of = 

| KOMET- LINKS & LINKS -BANNER | 

| HOSIERY — Boys -Misses -Ladies | 

| Phone 648 P. O. Box 367 | 

| MORRISTOWN, TENNESSEE | 

~3!EIIi:g9Elllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli:ilMIIIII!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIME!lllllllllilllI!IIIIlT; 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



39 



THE MAN WHO SPOKE TO HIMSELF 

By WILLIAM ORNSTEIN 

A new vein, from this versatile writer, this is Ornstein in a philosophical 
mood. There are many facets to this young man's writing, but they all strike 
home. Perhaps vou too have been in a mood similiar to the one herein de- 
scribed.— THE EDITOR. 



It is terrible to be lost in a big 
citv like New York. I don't mean 
lost in the generic sense. I should 
be more specific and limit it to the 
soul wandering and not being able 
to hold at the controls, one that is 
at loose ends clutching at signposts 
as a possible stabilizer and yet when 
equalibrium meets the eye it is not 
for long; maybe minutes, seconds 
before the soul again is tilting the 
fulcrum, reaching for weights, not 
straws, grasping for airpockets to 
breathe into only to cushion itself 




WILLIAM ORNSTEIN 



MARTINAT 
HOSIERY 
MILLS 



I 



H. F. MARTINAT 
Secretary and Treasurer 

Manufacturers of 
HIGH-GRADE HOSIERY 

VALDESE, N. C. 

m if 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t in i in 1 1 1 1 1 f i 1 1 1 1 1 1 in 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 in in 1 1 in in 1 1 1 it i i 1 1 1 ii i 1 1 1 i i i ii 1 1 ■ ■ 1 1 1 i i h i in 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ui 

I LIBERTY HOSIERY MILLS I 

1 INCORPORATED E 

| Full Fashioned Hosiery | 

= New York Sales Office E 

| EMPIRE STATE BUILDING E 

E NEW YORK I, N. Y. = 

E Longacre 3-1555 E 

= Plants at E 

| LIBERTY, N. C. GIBSONVILLE, N. C. | 

lTillllllllllllllllllllllll!IIIIIHIIIIIEIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllTi 



among thoughts of tomorrow, fear- 
ing the whipping post tonight and 
the mental torture on nights to 
come: the inevitable of a diffused 
soul whether it be floundering 
New York or any other city. But 
it is the largeness of this city and 
its eight millions teeming with a 
nervous compulsion never quite 
satisfactorily explained, this city and 
its multitude of cringing nerve- 
wracks and those minor beings who 
wash themselves in the sun of smug 
placidity, aloof bv mesmeric one- 
ness until the thin thread breaches 
their cloth and the soul becomes 
confusion apparent. 

I take a look around me and 
what do I see but confusion in all 
its pristine glory. There I go prying 
into other people, other minds, but 
I am walking at a brisk pace, and in 
this exercise I am free to think. The 
confusion is still there while I walk 
and think, but with it there is cer- 
tain freedom I cannot get any other 
way. So I speak to myself, go over 
the hours and minutes that have 
preceded my hustling to the Con- 
course for this sudden constitu- 
tional. 

Whether I have need for con- 
stitutionals or not, the convulsion of 
thinking grips me many times dur- 
ing the day. But those are moments 
that do not wrap themselves into 
my present confusion. It is the fact 
that I cannot understand certain 
elements, forces that deliberatelv 
would have me do things against 
my wishes, desires. Is this the free- 
dom I seek? Absolution from an 
enemy who would throttle my 
movements, thinking, ambition? I 
don't know, but my mind' is in that 
state of washing that cleanses as it 
mixes, and I seem to feel that I have 
just escaped from an enemy, a direc- 
tive I had no desire or ambition to 
carry out. It is my family that has 
told me what to do in no uncertain 
terms. It was clear to them and to 



AUMAN HOSIERY MILLS, Inc. 



Manufacturers of 

INFANTS' HOSIERY 



ASHEBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



Nu-Vogue Hosiery Mills, Inc. 



Manufacturers of 
45 — 51—60 GAUGE 

Ladies Full-Fashioned Hosiery 

GRAHAM, N. C. 



DAVIS HOSIERY CORPORATION 



Manufacturers and Distributors o 



LADIES' FINE HOSIERY 



i 



125 E. Market St. Dial 3-1935 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



TO ALL OUR SUPPLIERS, PATRONS AND 
FRIENDS OF THE JEWISH FAITH . . . 

May you have a Joyous Holiday 
and prosper in a NEW YEAR OF 
HAPPINESS, and WE PRAY, 
WORLD-WIDE PEACE 



A. PHILLIP GOLDSMITH, President 
Diamond Hosiery Corp. 

350 Fifth Avenue 
New York, N. Y. 




40 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



RIDGEVIEW 
HOSIERY MILL COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 

Ladies' Full Fashioned and Seamless 
HOSIERY 
NEWTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



S. D. ARROWOOD & CO. 
271 Church Street New York, N. Y. 



HILDEBRAN 

HOSIERY MILLS 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
Men's Seamless Hosiery 

HILDEBRAN, N. C. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiisiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinit 



Sales Office 
Ragan-Maurice Mills 



Empire State Bldg. 
New York, N. Y. 



Our Sincere Good Wishes to All of Our Jewish Friends 
for a Happy and Prosperous New Year 

LINDY HOSIERY CO. 

Men's, Women's and Children's Fine Hosiery 
BURLINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



me, and just exactly what the direc- 
tive was does not matter: it was the 
command antagonistic to any other 
and the challenger would not be a 
puppet not only to my family but 
to no one. Yes. No One! 

There is a sense of security in 
being alone and speaking to your- 
self. Yes, vou say, vou are old 
enough to know right from wrong. 
You have the initiative to accom- 
plish anything you set out to do, 
the will to carry through the essence 
of all goodness, the fortitude and 
ambition to succeed in the things 
you want most to do. Not the tran- 
sitory thing but the objective with 
meaning and fullness. You do not 
want to do anything for the 
moment. Rather you want it to 
have life, substance, endurance, and 
in order to manifest these one can- 
not direct or command the things 
that go into life, durability, perma- 
nance. The result must not be jelly- 
like, but yet it must be soft and 
tender so that it will not meet the 
quick ending of a thin or weak 
compatability. 

There it is and you are walking 
and muttering to yourself in the 
golden blare of s u n s h i n e. The 
blankness in your eyes suddenly 
frame the canyons of brick and 
mort a r, man-made mountains of 



habitation, roistering traffic; and 
suddenly you become aware of faces 
passing, eyes focused on you, color- 
less statues moving in both direct- 
ions. There are two currents and 
they are both muddled by confusion 
in their midst. It is apparent the 
minute you get a clear picture of the 
scene: apartment buildings, cars, 
people, faces, eyes, noses, mouths. 
Chatter. Clank. Swish. Babble. 
All in blissful state of confusion, a 
musical comedy of distorted sharps 
and clefs and pathetic prototypes. 

You have shut out of your sweep- 
ing focus all but the people and you 
say, Where are they going? March- 
ing in confused parallels: human 
currents. That's all it can be. Prat- 
tling and cluttering up sidewalks. 
Prattle. Endless mouthings. Jabber. 
Jabber. Prattle. It gets louder, 
boring, piercing with a vengeance 
as you move on. You cannot get 
away from it. What are these peo- 
ple prattling about? You wonder 
but there is no need to. Because 
you will never find out, like with 
the drop from that leaky faucet 
blop, blopping unending caca- 
phony. 

Why is it man has never been 
able to understand the sound of 
water? There must be a lot of 
(Please Turn to Page 95) 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



41 



THE GUILT MAKERS 

A Review by RABBI JEROME MARK 

David Weiss, author of the work which Rabbi Mark here discusses, won the 
$5,000 Frieder Award for "The Guilt Makers," in the recent contest sponsored 
by the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. — THE EDITOR. 



If Jews have suffered through the 
centuries, they are to blame. Their 
fault lies in the fact that they fail- 
ed in righteousness. They are the 
people of the Covenant: therefore, 
if they violate that contract with the 
Eternal, they must accept divine 
discipline expressed in persecution 
and intolerance. 

This is the conviction of one of 
the characters in the Book under dis- 
cussion, THE GUILT MAKERS. 
Before we examine the author's own 
conclusion let me recall the passage 
from the prophet Isaiah which I 
read to you. 

And proclaim unto her, 

That her time of service is accom- 
plished, 

That her guilt is paid off; 

That she hath received of the 
Lord's hand 

Double for all her sins. 

As you read chapters 40-55 of 
Isaiah you will find it most emphat- 
ically expressed that too often men, 
whether of Israel or not, suffer the 
guilt of others. To use a very corn- 



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mon example, if a man becomes 
obsessed with a murderous instinct, 
he will most generally shoot an in- 
nocent person. That person has suf- 
fered and perhaps died, though the 
guilty party in this instance is the 
criminal with the gun in his hand. 

Now we may consider the book 
from a broader angle than just an- 
other piece of fiction. You may re- 




DAVID WEISS 

call the Diary of Anne Frank. In 
the Guilt Makers, the author, Dav- 
id Weiss, raised the very challeng- 
ing question of what would happen 
to just such a sensitive person, an 
adolescent like Anne Frank, re- 
leased from a Concentration Camp. 
Would she, or in this case a young 
boy, adjust herself or himself to 
other conditions; let us say to the 
complex life of America, with its 
freedom and its pressures? Could 
the person rid himself of his fright- 
ful memories? Would he bring with 

(Please Turn to Page 74) 

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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



43 



The West, the Arab World and Israel 

By ABBA S. EBAN, Ambassador to the United States from Israel 

The following article is part of an address made by Ambassador Eban to the 
National Action Conference of the United Jewish Appeal in Washington on 
June 7th, 1953. — THE EDITOR. 



The Middle East attracts much 
scrutiny in these anxious times by 
those concerned for its security and 
progress. Modern Israel stands at 
the heart and center of this ancient 
region. The land masses of Europe, 
Asia and Africa are all within our 
neighboring gaze. The Mediter- 
ranean, chief artery of the western 
world, and the Red Sea looking to- 
ward the further East are united in 
Israel — and in Israel alone — by a 
short bridge of land friendlv to free- 
dom. Our central place in the 
world of geography reflects a corre- 
sponding centrality in the realm of 
ideals. The far-flung Jewish disper- 
sion gives us a sense of universal 
mission in space, which is further 
deepened in time, bv long and con- 
tinuous historic memories. Our 
democratic heritage, which we 
cherish with ardent passion, inspires 
a concern, which we share with 
others, for the strength and unity of 
democratic civilization. 

These, together with our immedi- 
ate responsibility for preserving Is- 
rael's new won statehood, are the 



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credentials of our authority to inter- 
pret the Middle Eastern scene. It 
is, I think, a strong authority. Others 
surpass us in the scope of their 
global responsibility and of their 
physical and political influence; 
but our contemplation of these 
problems has the virtues of intimacy 
and proximity. We also have the 
tested experience of an observation 
reaching back over decades and 
centuries. 

From this point of vantage, I now 
come to restate Israel's position on 
the major political problems of our 
region. 

The Arab World, Israel 
And The West 

Anybody coming upon the turbu- 
lent Middle Eastern scene encoun- 
ters vehement expressions of Arab 
resentment against the western 
world, and especially the United 
States bv reason of their support of 
Israel's independence. The point is 
hot whether this resentment exists, 
as it well may; but whether it is a 
just grievance deserving to be 
allayed — or an unreasonable neurosis 
to be refuted and denied. 

The modern history of the Mid- 
dle East is predominantly the 
process of swift and sudden Arab 
emancipation. A traveller to our 
region todav traverses the boun- 
daries of eight sovereign states not 
one of which had its freedom four 
decades ago. What a vast patri- 
mony this is — how immeasurable its 
potential and actual wealth, how 
limitless its possibilities of political 
and economic strength. The Arab 
people has inherited all this oppor- 
tunity after an area of subjection, 
squalor and foreign conquest lasting 
for five full centuries. The western 
powers have been the main archi- 
tects of this Arab Empire. Their 
sacrifices in two world wars, and 
their international action in recent 
years, have brought the Arab peoples 
with relatively little sacrifice on 
their own part, into this vast politi- 
cal empire. 

Within this majestic process of 
Middle Eastern liberation, Israel at 
the cost of blood and toil has 
achieved its birth of freedom in a 
small country less than a hundredth 
of the Arab domain, and half of that 
has been reduced by human neglect 
to arid desert. Look at the Arab 
map with its endless stretches of 
fertile land, its huge rivers yet un- 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




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harnessed, its oil wells brimming 
with wealth and power, its manifold 
sovereignties and strong interna- 
tional representation. Then look at 
Israel developing within the smallest 
possible margin of territorial and 
economic resources available to any 
State — and ask yourselves frankly: 
Are the Arab peoples the fair objects 
of condolence or of congratulations? 
Does the world owe an apology to 
them; or do they owe gratitude, 
forbearance and moderation to the 
world? Is it some injury that the 
western world has done them in 
sometimes supporting an infinitely 
smaller opportunity of freedom for 
another people to whom civilization 
owes so large a debt for its father- 
hood of moral civilization in the 
past, and its immeasurable agony in 
the present age? 

Not even at the height of its 
power in the days of the Caliphate 
did the Moslem world possess such 
elements of power, status and pros- 
perity as those which the western 
world has now put into its hands. 
Escaping the long colonial strug- 
gles which bore down with heavy 
weight on other peoples, the Arab 
subcontinent was rushed through 
its period of tutelage with headlong 
speed, and in some cases before the 
completion of their political ma- 
turity. Because we cherish national 
liberty for ourselves and others we 
do not begrudge them their fortune. 
But unless you decree that national 
liberty is the divine right of the 
Arab people, and something which 



non-Arabs can do without, you can- 
not condone the lachrymose, indig- 
nant, plaintive rancor which the 
Arab leadership shows to the world. 
At any rate, Israel's independence, 
though deeply precious to us, is no 
just grievance for them. No people 
has ever gained so large a measure 
of its aspirations as have they in so 
short a time. During this very 
decade 1943-53 in which they have 
waged a fierce and ignoble struggle 
against Israel's independence, thev 
have themselves obtained new sov- 
ereignties in four separate states — 
Syria, Lebanon, Jordan and Libya, 
always with our approbation and in 
one case with our help. 

There are no sound policies 
without accurate history. We hope 
that all who deal with Middle East- 
ern affairs will discern these major 
currents of historic process. A na- 
tion's claim for its own domain of 
freedom deserves respect. But a 
claim to deny or resent or restrict or 
mutilate the sovereignty of another 
people merits firm rebuke and spe- 
cific dissociation especially by those 
who seek to help our region heal its 
wounds and forget its rancors and 
its hates. Once we have this process 
of Arab good fortune in our mind, 
almost every aspect of the Arab- 
Israel controversy finds its answer 
within the overriding principle of 
equal sovereign rights. 

The United States, with its revo- 
lutionarv tradition still fresh in 
memory, has supported both the 
large Arab liberation and the more 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



45 



modest achievement of Israel's inde- 
pendence. I cannot understand 
why American support for Arab 
independence in eight countries 
should merit praise, while American 
support for Israel's independence 
justifies resentment. 

Regional Peace 
We regret that the Arab refusal 
to reach a peace settlement is so 
persistentlv maintained. It is en- 
couraging, however, to note that 
world opinion and especially the 
United States dissociates itself from 
this obduracv and continues to up- 
hold the view that Israel rightfully 
belongs to a peaceful community 
of sovereign Middle Eastern na J 
tions. Responsibility and initiative 
for seeking peace rightly belong — as 
Secretary Dulles said — to the gov- 
ernments of the area; but the 
constant advocacy of a peaceful set- 
tlement by influential powers can 
be of the utmost value and effect. 
The problem is to transform the 
relationships between states of well- 
defined territorial and demographic 
identity. The problem is not to 
rewrite any political or geographical 
map. You will have ready my Prime 
Minister's declaration of our willing- 
ness to conclude peace with the 
Arab states on the basis of our pres- 
ent frontiers and of theirs. It would 
be well for Arab governments to 
respond in similar terms and for- 
mally to abandon their slogans of 
territorial and political encroach- 
ment. 

Our present boundaries rest upon 
valid treaties, and contracts ap- 
proved by the United Nations and 
concluded at its behest. They may 
not be changed without consent. 
The Arab governments are them- 
selves mainly responsible for the 
processes whereby these frontiers 
were crystalized. They cannot seri- 
ously hope to revive arrangements 
which they attacked and destroyed 
by aggressive violence. There is 
something incongruous and cynical 



in their suggestion that the Arab 
states, with their vast expanse 
should seek to enlarge themselves 
still further at the expense of Israel's 
limited territory. We reject that 
claim with the utmost vigor. Our 
desire for peace is ardent and sin- 
cere, but it is strictly qualified by 
our vital rights and interests, of 
which our full territorial integrity 
and political sovereignty are the 
main and indispensable elements. 
We shall not sacrifice or renounce 
these in return for any political 
settlement. A country the size of 
Massachusetts might reasonably ex- 
pect not to be the object of terri- 
torial claims by a group of countries 
nearly as wide an area as the entire 
United States. 

We envisage the transition from 
armistice to peace as a far-reaching 
change not in political or geographi- 
cal facts, but in mutual relation- 
ships. The free flow of influences, 
ideas and commerce across a peace- 
ful Middle East, formed by the free 
cooperation of sovereign state would 




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American participants in the cornerstone 
laving ceremonv for Bar-Ilan University 
in Israel on July 28. 



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46 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



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contribute to the strength of the 
region as a whole, and of each state 
within it. The Arab countries would 
participate no less fully than we in 
the consequent reinforcement of our 
area's unity and strength. The Mid- 
dle East is not intrinsically a poor 
area, as its glorious history has 
proved. If we remove the obstacles 
to regional trade and cooperation, 
if we liquidate what have been 
rightly described as "wasteful meas- 
ures of economic w a r f a r e," the 
Middle East can recover its due 
economic independence and cultu- 
ral primacy. 

Refugees 

World opinion continues to con- 
solidate itself in favor of settling 
the Arab refugees in Arab countries. 
Progress towards the frank and full 
acceptance of this idea has not yet 
fully developed, but the movement 
is swift and favorable. Every cir- 
cumstance of responsibility requires 
that Arab governments cooperate 
vigorously towards this end. First, 
it was the Arab governments who 
created the problem by their frank 
decision to launch the war out of 
which this tragic misery arose. 
Second, the Arab governments 
which created the problem possess 
the full capacity to solve it; for they 
alone command the resources of 
land and water with which to under- 
take this resettlement, to their own 
benefit and with consequent rein- 
forcement of their own security and 
economic strength. 

If Israel with its small area and 
limited resources could create homes 
for 750,000 destitute immigrants, it 
is at least one hundred times more 
possible for the Arab states, so much 
more lavishly endowed, to find 
homes for an equivalent number 
of kinsmen, if only the will exists. 

It would be tragic if the abundant 
international aid made available in 
recent years and still continuing 
were to be dissipated on measures 
not leading towards a final settle- 



ment. The Israel government, for 
its part, is willing to cooperate to 
the fullest possible extent in such 
projects of resettlement in neighbor- 
ing countries. A third element of 
Arab responsibility is this: In ad- 
dition to their initial responsibility 
and their clear ability to solve it, 
the Arab states alone have the abil- 
ity, arising from their kinship and 
national identity with the refugee 
population, to provide conditions 
for a full reintegration, not only of 
body, but of mind and spirit, of 
language, loyalty and national senti- 
ment. All these factors, taken to- 
gether represent an impressive 
accumulation of reasons for expect- 
ing Arab governments to liberate 
their region and the world from the 
piteous impact of this suffering and 
grief. 

Regional Security 

The central fact about our re- 
gion's security is that the Arab states 
have once attempted to destroy 
Israel; that they had a good chance 
of success; that they have never re- 
nounced the hope of bringing about 
our ruin; and that they refuse to 
negotiate a peace settlement which 
would place the security of the 
Middle East on a firmer foundation. 
There is therefore no just compari- 
son between Israel's valid fear of 
Arab assault and the alleged Arab 
fear of Israeli aggression. Here again 
we confront an Arab slogan which 
should encounter the most specific 
and explicit criticism of those to 
whom it is addressed. 

The Arab states have made war 
upon Israel, not we upon them. Yet 
it is they who profess to fear our 
aggression. The Arab states refuse 
to recognize Israel's sovereignty or 
integrity, which we are fully pre- 
pared to recognize theirs. Yet it is 
they who pretend to need assurances 
of protection against us. Israel of- 
fers — and the Arab states refuse — a 
lasting peace which would consti- 
tute the most effective guarantee 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



47 



against unlawful encroachments. 
Yet, it is thev who proclaim every 
dav and night that the present situ- 
ation does not offer them adequate 
security. They are a great ocean of 
40 million in a wide expanse, ad- 
vantageously poised to converge 
upon us from every side as they 
have ahead}- done. Yet, it is they 
who conjure up the morbid and 
fantastic image of Israel, turning 
aside from its constructive preoccu- 
pations, in order to resume the war 
which we never wanted, which they 
began and which ended differently 
from their calculations. Here again, 
a glance at the map should put to 
ridicule this concept of the Arab 
states being "encircled" by Israel. 
At this very hour, while our neigh- 
boring states are completely free to 
pursue their life in full tranquility 
within their borders, Israel is the 
daily victim of purposeful encroach- 
ments which have cost us heavy loss 
in life and diffused an atmosphere 
of vigilant tension over wide sec- 
tions of the country. 

In these circumstances there is 
no value in the Arab attempt to 
equate Israels serious security 
problem with the frivolous concept 
of Arab fear or to emphasize the 
Arab allegation over and above the 
tangible threat to Israel. 

We recall that the Tn-Partite 
declaration of May 25, 1950 was 
conceived primarily as a guarantee 
of Israel's integrity against the 
alarming growth of Arab hostility 
and menace. While it is right that 
international guarantees against ag- 
gression should be formulated in 
terms of mutuality and reciprocity, 
this does not signify any admission 
by us that the figment of an Israel 
threat to the Arabs and the daily 



reality of the Arab threat to Israel 
have an equal reality or imminence. 

We watch with anxiety and in- 
terest efforts now being made to 
solve other security problems of the 
Middle East. We continue to ex- 
pect that direct or Indirect effects 
on Israel's security will be carefully 
weighed by the negotiating powers. 
It is obvious to us — and I feel cer- 
tain that it is obvious to the western 
governments — that the current atti- 
tude of the Arab states to Israel 
should rightly forbid any disturb- 
ance of the military balance in our 
disfavor, or any recognition or sup- 
port of anti-Israel coalitions in the 
Middle East. 

American-Israel Relations 

The attitudes which I have just 
outlined have evolved through the 
experience and ordeals of several 
years, in close consultation with the 
(Please Turn to Page 78) 




The establishment of the American- 
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day by Mr. Nathan StTaus III, Vice 
President Nathan Straus-Duparquet, 
Inc., and President Magnex Corp. 
elected first President of the new Ameri- 
can-Israel organization. 



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Cotton Manufacturers 

GASTONIA, N. C. 



PIEDMONT MILL SUPPLY 
COMPANY, Inc. 

Industrial 

Plumbing and Heating 
Contractors 




Phone I 77 P. O. Box 1 450 

SALISBURY, NORTH CAROLINA 



"SERVICE OUR MOTTO" 



PIEDMONT IRON WORKS 

High Grade Brass, Bronze and Aluminum Castings 
Gray Iron Castings — Semi-Steel Castings 

PARTS MADE FOR ALL KINDS OF MACHINERY 



We Manufacture Building, Municipal and Coffon Mill Castings 
Works: North Marietta Street Telephone 5-032 1 

GASTONIA, NORTH CAROLINA 



Specializing in Sand-Tooth Gears 
FOR ALL MAKES OF FRAMES 

Textile Work Is Our Specialty 
Designers of Wood and Metal Patterns 
Clean Soft Grey Iron, Brass, Bronze, and Aluminum Castings 
Made To Order 

Service — Quality — Price 

W. A. FREDERICK 

KINGS MOUNTAIN FOUNDRY 

North Marietta Street Phone 5-0255 

GASTONIA, NORTH CAROLINA 



To the many friends we have already made, and to those 
whose friendship we are yet to earn, we extend our sin- 
cere greetings for a very happy New Year. 

Southern Motor Express 

Incorporated 

Serving Industries in the South with Motor Delivery 
Service to Northern and Eastern Markets. 



New York Sales Office 
Tel. Worth 4-4867 



Main Office: GASTONIA, N. C. 



Terminals: New Jersey 
Baltimore, Greenville, S. C. 

Dial 5- 1 I 34 



48 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



THE JUGGLER 

(Continued from Page 9) 

CAST OF CHARACTERS 

Hans Muller . KIRK DOUGLAS 

Ya'El MILLY VITALE 

Detective Kami ..... PAUL STEWART 

Yehoshua Bresler .. .... JOEY WALSH 

Daniel ALF KJELLIN 

Susy BEVERLY WASHBURN 

Rosenberg CHARLES LANE 

Emile Halevy JOHN BANNER 

Kogan RICHARD BENEDICT 

Willy Schmidt OSCAR KARL WE IS 

Mordecai JOHN BLEIFER 

Sarah ........ GRETA GRANSTEDT 

Papa Sander JAY ADLER 

Dr. Traube . SHEP MENKIN 

Dr. Sklar GABRIEL CURTIZ 



Columbia's Stanley Kramer pro- 
duction, "The Juggler," tense drama 
of a former great European vaude- 
ville performer who, after suffering 
in Nazi concentration camps, comes 
to new serenity and self-understand- 
ing at an Israeli kibbutz, or co- 
operative farm, and will soon be 
playing in theatres from coast to 
coast. 

This film version of Michael 
Blankfort's best-selling novel of the 
same name stars Kirk Douglas in 
the name role, with Milly Vitale, 
Italy's Number One film box office 
attraction, playing opposite in the 



leading feminine romantic role. Im- 
portantly featured in the cast are 
Paul Stewart, Joey Walsh and Os- 
car Karlweis. Edward Dmytryk di- 
rected, and Blankfort, who wrote 
the screenplay, based upon his 
novel, served as associate producer. 

All of the outdoor scenes of "The 
Juggler" were made in Israel, with a 
troupe of thirty - four players and 
technical workers experiencing the 
excitement of location work in the 
Jewish state. Around this nucleus, 
a crew of forty-one technical assist- 
ants and laborers were recruited 
from the local citizenry. Practically 




GREEN RIVER 
MILLS, Inc. 



Manufacturers of 
HIGHEST QUALITY YARNS FOR THE 
THREAD— HOSIERY— KNITTING 
AND WEAVING TRADES 



10's to 80's single 2-3 and 4 ply — Gassed, Mercerized and 
Bleached — Put up on Cones — Tubes and Skeins 
Also Combination Specialties of Rayon 
Acetate — Cotton and Wool 

Your Inquiries Will Be Appreciated 



Phone 7412 



Hendersonville, N. C. 



all of these were actors, directors 
and technicians from three Israeli 
theatrical groups — the Habimah, 
Chamber and Ohel theatres. All 
were eager to take jobs with this 
first American motion picture troupe 
filming in Israel, in order to study 
screen techniques at first hand. 

A resort hotel on the Mediter- 
ranean at Shavei Zion, north of 
Haifa, became the company's head- 
quarters throughout the four weeks 
of shooting in Israel. From there, 
the company travelled to such far- 
flung locations as Nazareth, Haifa, 
Jerusalem, Lake Hule and the Jor- 
dan River, the Arab villages of Shafa 
Aim and Iqrit, the immigrant camp 
of Shaar Aliyah, Kibbutz Hanita, a 
cooperative farm in the hills on the 
border of Lebanon, and various 
other small settlements. 



In the story, Douglas is shown 
arriving at the immigration camp 
with his friend, played by Karlweis. 
Because of long confinement in Nazi 
concentration and post - war dis- 
placed persons camps, and the tragic 
loss of his wife and children, he has 
developed a neurotic fear of confine- 
ment. Escaping from the temporary 
camp where the newly arrived im- 
migrees are awaiting assignment to 
permanent quarters in various parts 
of Israel, he is challenged by a po- 
lice officer. 

In the resultant struggle, the of- 
ficer is badly hurt, and the panic- 
stricken refugee flees again, horror- 
stricken in the belief that he has 
committed murder. The story fol- 
lows his rehabilitation at the Kib- 
butz, through the compassion and 
(Please Turn to Page 50) 



- ;i lfef 



$ 



:feigpi*^l| 




life 

m 



> 




r 



Hans Muller (Kirk Douglas) and Ya'El (Milly Vitale) in a scene from the 
Columbia production "The Juggler". 



PIEDMONT FABRICS 

INCORPORATED 
Manufacturers of 

KNIT FABRICS 

Box 549 Phone 6331 

GASTONIA, NORTH CAROLINA 



GOSSETT 




MACHINE WORKS 




INCORPORATED 




Manufacturers and Repairers of 




TEXTILE PARTS 




Drawing Rolls a Specialty 




W. Franklin Ave. Telephones 5-4661 - 


- 5-0142 


GASTONIA, NORTH CAROLINA 





The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



49 




Quality Rayon 
Yarns for 25 
Years. Watch 

for Enlca Nylon 
in 1954. 



AMERICAN 

ENKA 



CORPORATION 



PLANTS 
ENKA, N. C. 
LOWLAND, TENN. 



SALES OFFICES 
206 Madison Avenue 
New York City 
and Greensboro, N. C. 



HOLIDAY GREETINGS 




COPLAND 

CONVERTING and FINISHING CO. 

Manufacturers of 
Rayon Acetate and Nylon Marquisettes 
BURLINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Selling Agents 

J. W. VALENTINE CO. 
40 Worth Street— New York 



BURKYARNS 

INCORPORATED 



Manufacturers of 

Resist Dyed Acetate Yarns 



VALDESE, N. C. 




York Mills 



Incorporated 



York, S. C. 



Neely Mills 



Incorporated 




York, S. C. 



50 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



Look to 
urliiiffton 



for sparkling leadership in textiles. Whether it's designing, develop- 
ment, research, merchandising, fashions or manufacturing, Burlington 
Mills has long been a leader in the production of beautiful high qual- 
ity fabric from man-made fibers. Burlington products today are being 
used in almost every area of life and interest. They are found in 
women's and men's apparel, in industrial and automotive fields, in work 
clothing, in men's and women's hosiery, ribbons, draperies, bedspreads 
and are being put to hundreds of other end uses. Recently the company 
further diversified its manufacturing operations by entering the woolen- 
worsted field for the first time. 

Burlington's designers are continually developing new products from 
the older, established fibers such as rayon, acetate, nylon and cotton, 
while at the same time the revolutionary new fibers — Orion, Dacron, 
Vicara and others — are being used in many original and exciting ways 
to make fabrics that were undreamed of a few years ago . . . fabrics 
that combine the best qualities of natural fibers with the wearability 
and serviceability that only man-made fibers can give. 



\ 



11; 




urimoton ivniis 

"Woven into the Life of America* 
EXECUTIVE OFFICES: GREENSBORO, N. C. 

MAKERS OF WOMEN'S UNDERWEAR AND UNDERWEAR FABRICS 
MEN'S WEAR FABRIC • DECORATIVE FABRICS # HOSIERY FOR 
MEN AND WOMEN • BLANKETS # COTTON PIECE GOODS AND 
YARNS • RIBBON # INDUSTRIAL & TRANSPORTATION FABRICS 



V/ 



APPALACHIAN MILLS 
COMPANY 

Men's and Boys' Underwear 

(Winter and Summer Weights) 



Ladies 9 Sweaters 
Hosiery Yarns 



understanding of a girl farm worker, 
played by Miss Vitale. The 19 year- 
old Italian film star was selected for 
the role because Producer Kramer 
saw in her sensitive beauty exactly 
the type to portray a "sabra" — a na- 
tive-born Israeli. The term, meaning 
the fruit of the cactus, has been 
given to the children and voung 
people born in the new home-land 
to denote that "they are tough on 
the outside, but tender and sweet 
within." 

Over 1000 Israeli extras were 
used throughout the picture, with 
Director Dmytryk using the inhabi- 
tants m each spot where shooting 
took place. Thus, newly arrived im- 
migrants from all parts of the world 
were used in scenes in the immi- 
grant camp, the farm workers at 
Hanita were in the kibbutz scenes, 
and citizens of Haifa were employed 
in scenes shot in the streets of their 
city. 

Aunique method of payment for 
such services was asked for at 
Hanita. The head of the kibbutz 
told the Americans that the group 
was not interested in money, but 
would joyfullv welcome the addition 
to their equipment of a fine new 
American tractor. The arrangement 
was made, and the kibbutz planned 
a big celebration for the day the 
tractor arrived. 

The cooperations of the Israeli 
government police and people 
played an important part in the suc- 
cessful filming of "The Juggler." An 
outfit that proved of tremendous 
help was a sight-seeing and transpor- 
tation organization named Yatour, a 
number of whose cars and drivers 
were hired for transportation. The 
drivers, all veteran Army officers, 
had formed this companv after tak- 
ing stiff courses in gcographv, arche- 
ology, languages, history and Bible 
study, so they could serve efficiently 
as guides. They became, not only 
the Columbia troupe's guides and 



chauffeurs, but trouble-shooters, in- 
terpreters and companions as well. 
Dmytryk credits them largely with 
smoothing the way throughout, so 
that the picture could be shot on 
schedule. 

With the signing of George 
Antheil to do the musical score, 
three Israeli songs were also ac- 
quired for inclusion in the picture, 
and for thematic use in the back- 
ground music. Two of the songs of 
folk flavor which are currently popu- 
lar in Israel were picked up by 
Dmytryk during his stay in Israel; 
they are titled "Sou'vuni" by J. Or- 
land and B. Zaira, and "Hay 
Dorona" by M. Nov and Haim 
Hefer-Feiner. One of the outstand- 
ing scenes in the kibbutz sequences 
is the "Hora," a folk dance partici- 
pated in by the young people of the 
farm community. The music for the 
dance, using traditional thematic 
material, was written by Gwili 
Broido, an Israeli woman composer 
now living in Washington. 

Members of the troupe quickly 
learned that Israel is intensely film- 
conscious. While "The Juggler" was 
on location in the country, three 
Kirk Douglas films — "Champion," 
"The Big Carnival" and "Young 
Man With a Horn" — played simul- 
taneously in various cities. In con- 
nection with the first two, Douglas 
made personal appearances in Tel 
Avi and Haifa. This was the first 
time in the history of the country 
that a film star had been seen in 
person, and Douglas added excite- 
ment to the occasions of his ap- 
pearance by delivering part of his 
speech in Hebrew. 

Paul Stewart had two pictures 
representing him in Israel — "Cham- 
pion," in which he had played with 
Douglas, and "The Window." Os- 
car Karlweis, playing on the Haifa 
screen in "Five Fingers," was an al- 
most legendary figure in the section 

(Please Turn to Page 113) 



Knoxville 1, Tennessee 



NEW YORK 

Empire State Building 

CHICAGO 

222 W. Adams St. 



ARE DISTRIBUTORS, INC. 



I 1 05 Park Terrace 



Greensboro, N. C. 



Tel. 4-5409 



Wholesale Distributors of 
HOLCOMB & HOKE FOL-DOOR - - - SCHLAGE LOCK CO. 
YALE LOCKS AND BUILDERS' HARDWARE 
THE STANLEY WORKS— Butts and Hinges 
VONNEGUT HARDWARE CO., Fire Exit Devices 
McKINNEY MFG. CO., Forged Iron Hardware 
OSCAR C. RIXSON, Checking Floor Hinges 
BOMMER SPRING HINGE CO., Spring Hinges 
AMERICAN CABINET HARDWARE CO., Cabinet Hardware 
GRANT PULLEY & HARDWARE MFG. CO. 
NUTONE, Inc., (Electric Door Chimes) 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



5i 





of Me 



CfUZOLINRS 




LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



Announcement has been made by- 
Mr. and Mrs. Saul M. Cohen of 
Lincolnton, of the engagement of 
their daughter, Madolyn, to Dr. 
Ralph G. Geldbart, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Israel Geldbart of Charleston, 
S. C. The wedding will take place 
in the fall. 

Miss Cohen attended Woman's 
College of the University of North 
Carolina and The University of Ala- 
bama. 

Dr. Geldbart, who served in 
World War II, attended The Cit- 
adel, received his Bachelor Science 
degree from The University of Chi- 
cago, and received a Doctor's degree 
from Northern Illinois College of 
Optometry. 

He is at present practicing in 
Charleston. 




ELIMINATES STAIR CLIMBING 



Invalids, older folks 
and people with 
heart ailments can 
now travel safely 
from floor to floor. 
These elevators are 
neat, safe and quiet 
—they probably cost 
less than you think. 

INCLIN-ATOR 

Travels up and down 
stairs. Seats fold up 
when not in use. 
Carries one or two 
persons. 





ELEVETTE 

This passenger ele- 
vator fits in stair- 
well or other avail- 
able space. Carries 
one to three per- 
sons. 

No overhead con- 
struction required. 
Operated by house 
current. Survey is 
free. 



Write or wire for full information 

MONARCH ELEVATOR 
& MACHINE CO.. INC. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Manufacturers of 
Electric and Oil-Hydraulic Elevators 
Dumb-Waiters — Sidewalk Lifts 




MISS MADOLYN COHEN 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Mrs. Sam Freedman, Correspondent 

Ben Ornoff, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
I. Ornoff, was married to Miss 
Linda Lewis, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Nathan Lewis of Washington, 
D. C. The wedding took place at 
the Southeastern Synagogue in 
Washington, D. C. 

A Mazel Tov is extended to Mrs. 
Dave Bergman on the marriage of 
her niece, Miriam Gordon, Wash- 
ington, D. C, to Herbert Cherner 
at the B'nai Israel Congregation, 
Washington, D. C. Miriam and her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Gor- 
don, have been frequent visitors in 
Durham. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Kaplan an- 
nounce the marriage of their 
daughter, Bertha, to Gerald L. Ho- 
berman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Hoberman of Englewood, N. J. 

"Durham is such a good place to 
come back to," so say many of our 
visitors in town. Perhaps the reason 
is that they are being treated so roy- 
ally with many luncheons and par- 
ties. A lovely one given recently was 
held at the Cupboard for five hon- 
ored guests: Mrs. Gene Schwartz, 
Akron, Ohio; Mrs. I. Messenger, 
Charoltte, N. C, Mrs. M. Lipset, 
Rochester, N. Y., Mrs. S. Robbins, 



Philadelphia, Pa.; and Mrs. Seymour 
Rosenstein, Patterson, N. J. 

After the luncheon, bridge and 
canasta were enjoyed by the 60 
guests. The hostesses were Mcs- 
dames N. Liebcrman, M. Moss, N. 
Wolfe, L. Katz and J. Zuckennan. 

Betsey Meyer, daughter of Mr. 



and Mrs. Sigmund Meyer, won a 
scholarship to Camp Tel Yehudah 
in Upper New York State. We ex- 
pect great things from you, Betsey. 

A special program of entertain- 
ment was presented at the Veter- 
ans Hospital recently by the Bcth- 
El Sisterhood. 




AiONTALDO'S 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 





Fur News — 

The Cravat Capelet! 

Wear it as an ascot scarf — 
wear it as a shoulder warmer — 
wear it as you will — 
it's easily convertible, featuring 
the "luxury" look plus versatility. 
Available in tipped Russian sable, 
silverblu or starlight mink. 

Exquisite skins, specially selected and worked with 
perfectionist craftsmanship. 

THE MONTALDO LABEL IN YOUR FURS SPEAKS FOR ITSELF 





52 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



Greensboro Daily News 

and 

The Greensboro Record 



Circulation 
Now Over 



100,000 

Daily ! 



ALWAYS USE 

TRAILWAYS THRU-LINER SERVICE 

"The SMARTEST Distance Between Two Points." 




Queen City Trailways 



The entire program was planned 
and produced by Mrs. Nathan 
IWolfe, Bejth-El Sisterhood repre- 
sentative at the Veterans Hospital. 

Mrs. Sam Freedman attended the 
Regional Hadassah Board Meeting 
in Washington, D. C. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon Moel and 
family have left for their summer 
home at Virginia Beach. We shall 
all miss Florence's yellow Packard 
around town. 

Mrs. Fanny Katz, Mrs. Edith 
Davis, Miami Beach, Florida, are 
the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Hockfield. We enjoy having these 
charming guests in Durham. 

Former Durhamites who are 
spending some time with their folks 
here are: Mrs. Gene Schwartz and 
family, Akron, Ohio, visiting with 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Sawolosky. 
It's good to see Gertie in town 
again. 

Mrs. I. Messenger, the former 
Judy Fruchtman, and her charming 
brood, are here to spend a few weeks 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Fruchtman. 

Mrs. M. Lipset, the former Ev- 
elyn Katz, came all the way from 
Rochester, N. Y., with her daugh- 
ter, Roberta, and son, Michael, to 
spend a few weeks with her mother, 
Mrs. Lena Katz. Evelyn is really 
getting a Southern tan. 

Mrs. Seymour Rosenstein, the for- 
mer Adele Zuckerman, is visiting 
with her husband and son, at he 
home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Charlie Zuckerman. 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Zelon and 
family have just returned from a va- 
cation in New York. 

Mrs. S. Robbins, Philadelphia, 
Pa., is the guest of her daughter, 
Mrs. Herbert Rancer . 

LeRay Bergman, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Mitchell Bergman, is visiting 
in Roanoke with his uncles, Babe 
and Sid Louis, at Sam-Za-Rah Farm. 
Have a good time on the farm, 
LeRay. 



New citizens of Durham are Rob- 
ert Alan, the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Paul Keyser and Sandra Yolanda, 
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Her- 
bert Rancer. We wish the parents 
a mazel tov! 



HIGH POINT, N. C. 

Roberta N. Robinson, Correspondent 

In an impressive formal ceremony 
on the evening of August 2nd, Miss 
Teasa Bloom became the bride of 
Colvin S. Abrams of Danville, Va., 
at Sedgefield Inn. Rabbi William 
Gold officiated, assisted by Rabbi 
E. B. Eshler. 

Miss Beverly Bloom, sister of the 
bride, was maid of honor. 

Ushers were Stanley Jacobson, 
cousin of the bride, and Davis 
Abrams, brother of the groom, from 
Danville. 

The bride wore a gown of French 
imported Chantilly lace over bridal 
satin. The sculptured bodice fea- 
tured a mandarin collar and the 
bouffant ballerina-length skirt had 
inverted nylon pleats set in between 
scalloped lace. Her hand-blocked 
three tiered veil of illusion was 
caught to a scalloped cap of satin 
and lace, with orange blossom clus- 
ters. She carried a white Bible 
topped with a white orchid and 
satin streamers. 

"JEWISH OLYMPICS" IN 
ISRAEL SEPTEMBER 20TH 

The fourth World Maccabiah, 
better known as the "Jewish Olym- 
pics", will be staged in Israel from 
September 20th to 29th. A large 
contingent of athletes from this 
country are being groomed to send 
over, and the group will contain 
not only Jewish athletes, but a num- 
ber of non-Jewish record holders. 

Do It Now! Buy That 
Israel Bond! 



SOUTHERN ELEVATOR COMPANY 

Manufacturers 

Traction Type Freight and Passenger Elevators 
Oil Hydraulic Elevators 
Electric and Hand Power Dumbwaiters 

Telephone 4-2162 Telephone Day or Night 6-2585 

Box 2528 Box 2091 

Greensboro, N. C. Charlotte, N. C. 

Service and Repairs on All Makes 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



53 




MRS. COLVIN S. ABRAMS 



Immediately' following the wed- 
ding the parents of the bride, Mr. 
and Mrs. Israel Bloom, entertained 
with a reception and dinner honor- 
ing the bridal couple. 

A course dinner was served in the 
Corinthian Room at Sedgefield Inn 
where the bride's table featured a 
tree of white spider chrysanthemums 
and fern. Arrangements of white 
chrysanthemums, gladioli and fern 
formed the centerpieces for the 
twelve tables. 

The bride, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Israel Bloom, graduated from 
High Point High School and at- 
tended Woman's College of the 
University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro for two years. The 
groom, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jack 



Abrams of Danville, Ya., studied 
accounting at the University of Vir- 
ginia and is a member of Alpha 
Epsilon Pi fraternity. 

Many out-of-town guests attended 
the wedding and were from Ports- 
mouth, Va., Norfolk, Va., New 
York City, Danville, Va., Patterson, 
N. I., and Washington, D. C. 

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Wender 
were High Point visitors. Mr. Wen- 
der is the former Diane Waggcr of 
High Point. 

Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Sirrul on the birth of their 
new son. 

Best wishes for much happiness 
to Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Sheckter 
on the purchase of their new home 
in our city. 



MORGAN TRUCKING COMPANY, Inc. 

W. G. BONDURANT, President 
Serving More Than 1,500 Cities in Ten States 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



HOME OFFICE 
P. O. Box 2047 
Phone 4-2464 



BRANCH OFFICE 
Jersey City, N. J. 
Phone Journal Square 5-6443 



1953 



5714 



Greetings and Best Wishes 
For a New Year of Health, 
Happiness and Prosperity 

Blue Gem Manufacturing 
Company 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



GIBBS 

MACHINE CO. 

Manufacturing 
Parts 



j 1023 W. Lee St. 



5088 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 




BUSH TRANSFER, Inc. 

MOTOR FREIGHT LINES 

Furniture Freight Service and General Commodities 



LENOIR, N. C. 

Telephones: 
4-5391 & 4-5392 



SE RVICE SU BSCRIBER 
AM B Rl 



Si 



Between Lenoir and all points in Virginia, 
District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsyl- 
vania; Delaware, New Jersey ahd New 
York City. 



54 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



I Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for 




| SOUTHLAND WOOD PRODUCTS CO. =: 



Manufacturers of 

Cedar Furniture 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



\ 

i 



3eSilSIIIIIIIII!!iliilIlllllllillllllllllllll!llll!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllSllllllllllllllllilltliT< 



Carolina Steel & Iron Co. 
STEEL FABRICATORS 



1439 S. Elm St. 



Dial 4-5431 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



HAPPY NEW YEAR • © • 



ODELL 

MILL SUPPLY COMPANY 

"Everything for the Mills" 



300 North Forbis Street 



Dial 2-2113 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 




THURSTON MOTOR LINES 

INCORPORATED 

"Serving Norfh Carolina and Virginia Since 1933" 

Insured Service — Fast — Safe ~ Reliable 

General Offices 
WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 




/I bound QleettdM&iG 

Geri Le Brun and Genie Jacobs, Correspondents 



I wouldn't exactly say I have a 
scoop for this month. Matter of 
fact, I would go so far as to say 1 
haven't any news. However, rather 
than disappoint my panting public, 
I shall try to dig up some homey 
facts about what we homey people 
have been doing lately. 

Well, Mimi and Julie Lerner are 
back from a jaunt to Atlantic City 
to see The Folks. They had a fine 
time, and the baby took the trip — 
like a baby. No, really, he was just 
fine. 

George and Zelda Breslow gave 
New Jersey a treat with a visit to 
George's folks up thataway, and 
now they're back full of smiles. 
That is, Zelda is full of smiles. 
George is full of old poker chips. 
Eh, George? 

The Lee Kays and the George 
Blanksteins spent a pleasant inter- 
lude at Myrtle Beach with Ellen and 
Barbara Ann. All are now back, 
brown as berries (come to think of 
it, all the berries I have seen are red 
— Howcum?). 

Harry and Marion Silvers have 
reallv had the company. Marion's 
brother, Fred Solymos visited with 
his wife Blanche, followed by Mari- 
on's brother Henry with his wife 
Charlotte, followed by Harry's sister, 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Wiener. 

The Doctor Harry Karesh's are 
still telling folks about the happy 
week in which they cruised to Nas- 
sau. Bea says its an experience they 
will not forget for many moons. 

Everyone enjoyed the picnic sup- 
per held by the Beth David con 
gregation for its members. A water- 
melon contest was among the many 
stunts that enlivened the proceed- 
ings. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bertram Levy are 
the proud parents of a daughter, 
born August 3rd. 



Max and Sarah Klein are receiv- 
ing congratulations on the birth of 
Mehss, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Leonard Caust, of Rego Park, Long 
Island. 

The team representing B'nai 
B'rith in the Inter-Church Soft Ball 
League of Greensboro won the 
championship playoffs in a game on 
the night of August 5th, in which 
they defeated the team from the 
Magnolia St. Baptist Church by the 
score of 1 1 to 1 . The team was cap- 
tained by Jerry Mathes. Winning 
trophies is nothing new for the B'nai 
B'rith team, as they won the playoffs 
in 1952 and also received the Good 
Sportsmanship Trophy. 

Let's see now — sorry, but that did 
it. I am fresh out of news. How- 
ever, I promise to do better next 
month if someone will please just 
get married. 



WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Mrs. Bruce Levin, Correspondent 

The members of our community 
are departing North, East, South 
and West on vacations with too 
much rapidity to account for each 
individually — and as pleasant as it is 
to have a change of scenery, every- 
one I've talked to has agreed that it 
is also good to return home! 

Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. 
Sam Pinnolis upon the birth of their 

| New Year Greetings j 



COTTON 



Greensboro, N, C. 



i 




KLOPMAN MILLS, 



INC. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



55 





MRS. MURRAY W. SCHIFFMAN 
Mrs. Schiffman, the former Marilyn June Parlman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Philip Pearlman, of Gastonia, was married to Murray W. Schiffman, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Simon Schiffman, of New York City, at Temple Emanuel by 
Rabbi Jerome Mark, on July 4th. 



second child, a girl. And more re- 
cently, to Mr. and Mrs. Abe Brenner 
upon the birth of their son. At the 
time of this writing Mike and Fran- 
ces Brenner are counting the days 
until Mom and the new baby arrive 
home from the hospital. 

Rabbi Ernst Conrad is spending 
the month of August in Baltimore, 
Maryland. He is studying for his 
doctorate in the Oriental Language 
Department of Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. Lay members of Temple 
Emanuel Congregation will conduct 
regular Friday night services during 
the Rabbi's absence. 

One of the most radiant women 
in town these days is Mrs. Mildred 
Kalet who has son Bert Kalet home 



from Germany after two vears of 
service with the Army. It's also 
good to see Lieutenant Emanuel 
Katzin back in civilian clothes. 
Emanuel, son of Mrs. and Mr. Sam 
Katzin, has been discharged from 
the Air Force after serving at Kees- 
ler Field, Mississippi. 

Another "it's a small world" in- 
cident has cropped up at a base in 
Germany where two of our local 
bovs, Harris Clein, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Ben Clein — and Herbert 
Teichman, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Max Teichman are both stationed 
at the present time. 

Our deepest sympathy to Mr. and 
Mrs. Phil Robin and family upon 
the recent loss of their son Steve. 



MATHEWES CREWS & LUCAS 

Incorporated 

COTTON 

1405 E. Bessemer Ave. Greensboro, N. C. 



GREENSBORO LOOM REED COMPANY 

Manufacturers 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



Greetings and Best Wishes to Our Many Jewish Patrons 
and Friends for a Happy Holiday 

WILLIAMS & BROWER 

INCORPORATED 
Manufacturers of 

SCHOOL FURNITURE 

SILER CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 



LIFE INSURANCE 

Castles in the Air become realities when supported by 
a solid foundation of Life Insurance. 



Walter J. Bernstein 




Special Agent — Ordinary Dept. 
Jefferson Building Phone 6419 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



CRAIG & BUCHANAN 

Loom Reed Co. 

1837 Spring Garden St. Dial 3-3813 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



TOMLINSON CO., Inc. 

Plumbing, Heating and 
Industrial Supplies 
GREENSBORO, N. C. DURHAM, N. C. 




INSURANCE COMPANY / 



INSURANCE COMPANY 

HOME OFFICE 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

INCORPORATED 193*7 



56 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



^liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiL 




from your friendly 

COLONIAL 
STORES 




COtONlAl 
STORES 



~l 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 lllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllMllllllllllllllllllllillllllllliillllllllllllllllllKT: 

Mllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllt 



P. O. Box 527 



Phone 5009 



VIKING 

SPRINKLER COMPANY 



Underwriters Approved Automatic Sprinkler Systems 



HIGH POINT, N. C. 
llllllllMlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliiiiiiny 



We Wish to Take This Opportunity to Extend the 
Season's Greetings and Best Wishes to All Our 
Many Jewish Patrons and Friends 

Southern Natural Gas Co. 



WATTS 
BUILDING 



BIRMINGHAM, 
ALABAMA 



IN RALEIGH 

It's Always 

THE SIR WALTER 

400 Rooms 

with 

Bath, Radio and Circulating Ice Water 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

A Meyer Hotel Arthur E. Buddenhagen, Manager 



HICKORY, N. C. 

Phil Datnoff, Correspondent 

Sammy Lerner, a rising Senior at 
the Univ. of N. C, attended the~ 
Air R.O.T.C. summer camp at Don- 
aldson Air Force Base at Greenville, 
S. C. As a member of the Air 
R.O.T.C, one must attend these 
schools and receive training in all 
phases of air schooling. These sum- 
mer classes are for a period of six 
weeks. 

Mr. Irving Goldiner and Harold 
Saks of Miami, were visitors at the 
home of Irving's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Max Goldiner. 

Mr. Dave Lerner of Lincolnton 
vacationed in Hot Spring, Arkansas, 
for a few weeks. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Adler and family 
of Morganton vacationed in New 
Jersey following the Fourth. Mr. 
Adler attended the Shriner's con- 
vention while in the north country. 

Mr. Sam Katz recently attended 
the wedding of his nephew in Balti- 
more. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Harrison 
spent some time vacationing in the 
New England States. 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Roth vaca- 
tioned in the land of the sunshine 
of Florida. 

T. R. (Ted) Kramer, Jr., son of 
Mr. and Mrs. T. R. Kramer, is now 
a midshipman at the Naval Acad- 
emy at Annapolis, Md. Midship- 
man Kramer entered the Academy 
on June 24th. Prior to attending 
the academy, he prepared himself 
for naval training by attending Mar- 
ion Military Institute at Marion, 
Ala. 

Mrs. Sidney Mintz and daughter 
Ava Lynn have returned to their 
home in Washington after spending 
part of the summer months at the 
home of her father, Mr. D. Witten. 



Mrs. Max Lerner and son Jack of 
Taylorsville, flew to New York to 
spend some of the summer visiting 
at the home of her mother. 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

Mrs. Bert Raff, Correspondent 

Among those present at the N. C. 
Jewish Leadership and Education 
Conference held at "Wildacres", 
August 17th to 23rd, were Mrs. 
Stanley Slesinger and Mr. Hilbert 
Fuerstman both representing Tem- 
ple Beth El of Charlotte. 

The Conference, sponsored by 
the N. C. Association of Rabbis, is 
an annual event held for the pur- 
pose of the education in advanced 
teachings methods and the exchange 
of ideas and problems of the Sunday 
School teachers throughout the 
state. 

The facilities of "Wildacres" at 
Little Switzerland, N. C, are made 
available for all Sunday School 
teachers through the generosity of 
Mr. and Mrs. I. D. Blumenthal of 
Temple Beth El. 

Our community mourns the pass- 
ing of Mr. Ray Kirsner, husband of 
the former Miss Hilda Malever of 
Charlotte. 

Tempel Israel announces the ap- 
pointment of Solomon Sternberg as 
cantor. Cantor Sternberg arrived in 
Charlotte with his wife about a 
month ago. He received his secular 
education at City College, New 
York City, and his cantorial training 
at the Jewish Institute of Religion 
— H. U. C. School of Sacred Music, 
from which he graduated this June. 
He officiated at the Jackson Heights 
Jewish Center and has wide expe- 
rience in cantorial and teaching po- 
sitions. Cantor Sternberg is a 



"Tap-Co" Asphalt Pavements 

MANUFACTURED "HOT" or "COLD" 
USED FOR 

DRIVEWAYS — PARKING LOTS — ROADS 

For Estimates — Call 

THOMPSON-ARTHUR 
PAVING COMPANY 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 
Phone 2-2104 



DANVILLE, VA. 
Telephone 3644 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



57 



brother of Ralph Sternberg who was 
Cantor in Temple Israel a number 
of years ago. 

Hyman Brody has arrived in Char- 
lotte to take charge of the educa- 
tional program of Temple Israel. He 
received a degree in education from 
Temple University, and is a gradu- 
ate of Graetz College of Jewish 
Studies, where he was also an in- 
structor. His organizational and 
teaching experience includes three 
years in Israel, where he organized 
and taught youth groups. He has 
also been associated with the Bonds 
for Israel Campaign. 

Following are the new officers of 
Tempel Israel: Mr. Morris Speiz- 
man, President (re-elected); Dr. 
A. A. Kossove, Vice President; Jerry 
Joffe, Secretary; S. S. Fligel, Treas- 
urer. Elected to the Board were: 
Ellis Berlin, Dr. David Citron, Sam 
Grosswald, Manny Guller, Ben 
Jaffa, Leon Kraft, I. C. Kurtz, Sol 
Levine, Aaron Orenstein, Hyman 
Polk, Herman Rosenstein, Harry L. 
Schwartz, Walter Shapiro, M. J. 
Siegel, Ted Valenstein, and Dr. 
Philip Naumoff, ex officio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Levy are receiv- 
ing congratulations on the birth of 
daughter Beverly Ann, recently 
named at a ceremony in Temple 
Israel. 



IVEY 
WEAVERS 

INC. 

Manufacturers of 

FINE 
COTTON CLOTH 



HICKORY, N. C. 

Selling Agents 
McCampbell & Company 
40 Worth Street 
New York, N. Y. 



A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert L. Heymann at Hyland 
Park, 111. The child is the grandson 
of Mr. and Mrs. N. D. Levy, and 
the great-grandchild of Mrs. M. B. 
Smith. 

Mr. and Mrs. I. C. Kurtz are re- 
ceiving congratulations on the mar- 
riage of their son Jack, to Florence 
Y. Huxford, of Charleston, S. C. 



HADASSAH 

Mrs. Daniel S. Green, Correspondent 

ITie Board of the Charlotte 
Chapter of Hadassah met in full 
session on August 5th, 1953 at Tem- 
ple Beth El. 

An Integration Tea for new mem- 
bers was held at the home of Mrs. 
I. H. Madalia to acquaint them 
with Hadassah's program and work. 
Mrs. D. Retchin was in charge. 

On July 29th the Big Five Com- 
mittee met to map out plans for 
their annual Fall Campaign. The 
Big Five consists of H. M. O., 
Youth Aliyah, Hebrew University- 
Hadassah Medical School, Hadassah 
Hospital, and Vocational Educa- 
tion. The local chairmen are Mrs. 
L. Firestone, Mrs. L. Madans, and 
Mrs. P. L. Stewart. 

If you are looking for 'Hadassah- 
inspiration' go see Mrs. David Hoff- 
man, Charlotte President. Sonya is 
a ball of fire and can't wait for the 
season to get under way. She'll be 
our inspiration through many try- 
ing times. 

Happy New Year to all our co- 
workers and their families! 




Flora Gross, 4, and her sister 
Sarah, 2, immigrants from Bel- 
gium, take a first rather fearful 
glance at their new country while 
their father and mother, Mayer 
Gross, 27, and Miriam, 29, are 
helped through the customs and 
immigration formalities by HIAS, 
Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, 
aides. There are two more chil- 
dren, Helena, 6, and Moses, 6 
months. All the children were 
born in Antwerp, Belgium, where 
Mr. and Mrs. Gross found them- 
selves in 1946 and where they 
lived until HIAS could arrange 
their immigration to the U. S. A. 



RHYNE-HOUSER 
MANUFACTURING 
COMPANY 

* 

BO's^O's — 60's-IOO's 
COMBED YARNS 
* 

CHERRYVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 



ROCKFISH-MEBANE 

YARN MILLS, Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

COTTON YARNS 

20's to 40's Single and Ply 
HOPE MILLS, NORTH CAROLINA 



JI1IIIIIIIIII«IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIF^ 

§ Season's Greetings and Best Wishes to All Our Many = 
E Patrons and Friends for a Happy New Year = 

I NEISLER MILLS I 

= INCORPORATED = 

= Manufacturers of = 

| Drapery and Upholstery Fabrics 1 
| Spreads and Napkins | 

1 KINGS MOUNTAIN, NORTH CAROLINA \ 

FjlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllMlllllllllllllllllllnT 



PURITAN FINISHING MILLS 

INCORPORATED 

High Class Hosiery Finishers 

Finishing Men's, Boys', Infants' and Misses' Hosiery 
BURLINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



58 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes to All Our Many 
Patrons and Friends for a Happy and 
Prosperous New Year 



Sellers Manufacturing 
Company 

Royal Cotton Mill Co. 

COTTON YARNS 
Mercerized — Carded — Combed 



. . Sales Office . . 
SAXAPAHAW, NORTH CAROLINA 



WESTBORO WEAVING CO. 

Manufacturers 
TAPES and NON-ELASTICS 

GREENVILLE, N. C. 



ASHEVILLE, N. C. 

Mrs. Leon Feldman, Correspondent 

The regular study group of the 
Asheville Chapter of Hadassah was 
held at the home of Mrs. Else 
Moser on Monday, July 27th. This 
was the sixth in a series on Great 
Jewish Women in History, and the 
second period devoted to the study 
of the Middle Ages. Mrs. Sam Slos- 
man was the leader for the day and 
deserves an award of merit for her 
enlightening presentation. Lemon- 
ade and cookies were served by our 
charming hostess. 

Mrs. W. W. Michalove, Presi- 
dent of the Jewish Community Cen- 
ter returned from the Executive 
Board meeting of the Southern Sec- 
tion of J. W. B. to inform us that 
she has the unique honor of being 
the one and only woman president 
of a J. C. C. in the history of 
J. W. B. She was welcomed in a 
royal fashion and had escorts galore. 

An "open house" has been 
planned by the Center Board for 
August 26th, to welcome Mr. 
Manny Batshaw, J. W. B. Field 
Secretary, and Mr. Aaron Brenner, 
member of the National Board. 

The J. C. C. Day Camp has been 
in full swing for the past six weeks. 
What a busy six weeks for all con- 
cerned. Tumbling, Boxing, Folk 
Dancing, Swimming, Arts and 
Crafts are on the list of daily ac- 
tivities for all campers. Friday aft- 
ernoon finds all of them assembled 
at the Center where they conduct 
their own Sabbath Services. Field 
Day exercises and a handicraft ex- 
hibit are scheduled for the near fu- 
ture. Two overnight camp-outs were 
held to date Sliding Rock — near the 
foot of Mount Pisgah. An excellent 




For Knitting or Weaving 
AMERICAN DURENE* 

Highest Quality Mercerized Yarns 

NATURAL YARNS 
Combed Peeler or Sak— 10's - 90's Single 
Combed Peeler or Sak, 10's-100's Ply 



Maa« or 

I multi-ply mercerized combed 
cotton yarn 

4 WAYS BETTER 

than ordinary cotton yarns 
EXTRA COMFORT 

•-more absorbe/if 
EXTRA STRENGTH 

— longer wear 
EXTRA QUALITY 

-~latthg luttm 
EXTRA SERVICE 

— ecuy to wash 



Knitting Yarns 



Combed, 14's-60's 



Carded, 8's-30's 



THREAD DIVISION LAWRENCEBTJRG, KENTUCKY 

W. H. SUTTENFIELD, Vice-President and Sales Manager 



MOUNT HOLLY, N. C. 

Mr. C. E. Wood 

Miss E. R. Abernethy 

Mr. T. J. Davis 
HIGH POINT, N. C. 

Mr. E. J. Holbrook 



BOSTON, MASS. 
222 Summer Street 

CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 
Mr. H. W. Davenport 
735 Chestnut Street 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
Mr. Wm. Montgomery 
3701 N. Broad St. 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 
Wood and Hutchinson 
222 W. Adams St. 



NEW YORK, N. Y. 
51 Madison Avenue 

GASTONIA, N. C. 

Mr. T. C. Smotherman 



AMERICAN AND EFIRD MILLS, Inc 



MOUNT HOLLY, NORTH CAROLINA 



time was reported by all who par- 
ticipated. 

The evening of July 29th found 
the Center as the scene of the "Ter- 
mite Bazaar" — they want in, we 
want them out. Mr. P. Horowitz 
was the winner of the free trip to 
Miami. 

The members of the B'nai B'rith 
Men's Lodge have been buzzing 
around for weeks making arrange- 
ments for the meeting of the 
Central Administrative Committee 
which will bring to Asheville: Mr. 
Philip Klutznick, President of the 
Supreme Lodge; seven Vice Presi- 
dents; Mr. Sidney Kusworm, Treas- 
urer; and Mr. Maurice Bisgyer, Sec- 
retary. So far, a B'nai B'rith "Jam- 
boree" has been planned and will 
be held at the Enka Lake Club 
House. It will include a specially 
prepared Barbecue Supper and a 
program of Square Dancing under 
the supervision of Mr. Hubert 
Hayes. 

The Women of B'nai B'rith have 
been busy too. Miss Janice Karesh, 
Temporary Chairman, met with her 
committee at the home of Mrs. Her- 
man Silver to make arrangements 
for the forthcoming visit of Mrs. 
Albert Woldman, President of the 
Women's Supreme Council; Mrs. 
Arthur Laufman, Director of Wom- 
en's Activities; and Mrs. Maurice 
Goldberg, President of Women's 
District Grand Lodge No. 5. A 
luncheon meeting was planned 
for Mrs. Goldberg on Monday, Au- 
gust 10th, and a Tea in honor of 
Mrs. Woldman and Mrs. Laufman 
was to be held at the Battery Park 
Hotel on the following Wednesday. 

The Misses Audie Bard, Paula 
Lachman, Deborah Berney, Lois 
Klein and Ronda Feldman returned 
to Asheville on Sunday, August 2nd, 
after spending the summer months 
at Transylvania Music Camp. Stud- 
ies for the summer included Piano, 
Theory, Chorus and Art. 

Miss June Sollod has returned 
from Baltimore where she spent a 
pleasant vacation with relatives. 

Among the many visitors in Ashe- 
ville were Mrs. Rolland Abrahams of 
Nashville, Tennessee, and Mrs. 
George M. Green of Chicago, 
daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Gustav 
Lichtenfels, who were visiting at the 
home of Mrs. Rudolph Gumpet, 
also a daughter of the Lichtenfels. 

Miss Johanna Sternberg of Phila- 
delphia, sister of Mr. Joseph Stern- 
berg of Asheville has been visiting 
with the Sternbergs and the Alfred 
Lichtenfels. 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Michalove 
and daughter Paula of Greensboro, 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



59 



N. C, were the guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Barney Pearlman. During their 
visit they covered all points of in- 
terest from Mount Mitchell to 
Cherokee. 

Mrs. Gustav Lichtenfels who suf- 
fered a hip fracture, is recuperating 
at St. Joseph's Hospital, and is re- 
ported as doing very well. 



WILSON, N. C. 

Mrs. Nathan Shor, Correspondent 

Wilson's Jewish Community is 
now eager to begin it's fall season 
with many activities. It seems every 
one is bubbling over with enthusi- 
asm upon the completion of our 
newly erected Synagogue. 

Plans are being made for a dedi- 
cation dinner which is to be held 
very shortly. We have selected the 
name of Beth El as our House of 
worship and sanctity. 

Hadassah-Sisterhood, now one 
united group, is eager to round up 
plenty of rummage for our annual 
sale, during the months of Septem- 
ber and October. 

For the past months the folks in 
Wilson have missed the monthly 
Schmorgasbord Suppers sponsored 
by the Hadassah-Sisterhood and are 
anxiously awaiting their return. 

Mozeltof and best wishes are ex- 
tended to Mr. and Mrs. Louis Sum- 
merfield upon the marriage of their 
daughters Carol Ann to Irving Adler 
of Tarboro and Rena to Alfred Gor- 
don of Statesville. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Barshay have 
celebrated the Bar Mitzvah of their 
son Hyman. We have much faith 
in Hyman's integrity and feel he will 
always be a blessing to his parents 
and a credit to his fellow man. 

Several graduates have also been 
amongst our midst and of these we 
pay homage and congratulations to 
Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Brown upon 
the graduation of their sons Richard 
and Arthur. 

Mr. and Mrs. Julius Switzer have 
returned from Florida where thev 



spent several weeks of pleasant re- 
laxation. 

Mrs. Irving Mink has been visit- 
ing her folks at Miami. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Hanchrow have 
returned from a most enjoyable as 
well as informative vacation at Little 
Switzerland, Wild Acres. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Barshav and 
children have recently returned after 
vacationing at Wrightsville Beach. 

We extend our condolences to 
Mrs. Martin Steinberg upon the loss 
of a brother and Mrs. Joe Han- 
chrow the passing of her father. 

Mr. Meyer Brown has been hos- 
pitalized the past few weeks and we 
sincerely wish him a speedy re- 
covery. 

Wilson welcomes into our fold 
the following new comers: Mr. and 
Mrs. Joe Strauss of Virginia and Mr. 
and Mrs. Mo Maranoff of Philadel- 
phia and Atlantic Citv. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Shor an- 
nounce the betrothal of their daugh- 
ter Arlene Marcia to Dr. Donald 
Styles of Richmond, Va. 




Henrv Solomon (right), Chairman of the 
Brooklyn Ner Tamid Committee, shows 
the Ner-Tamid Award to Explorer 
Bernard Brodsky of Troop 121, spon- 
sored by the Albert Einstein B'nai 
B'rith Lodge of Brooklyn, after the 
Scout passed his review making him the 
1000th Scout in the United States to 
receive this high Award. The Ner 
Tamid or Ethernal Light Award is pre- 
sented to Scouts who demonstrate an 
outstanding knowledge of Jewish his- 
tory, Bible and religion, and who render 
personal service to the community. 



I 



T T T T T ' 



B. & W. FRAME WORKS 

Manufacturers of 

Living Room Frames and Odd Chairs 

Phone 5-3141 
HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 



ALDERMAN PHOTO COMPANY, Inc. 

Commercial and Illustrative Photography Since 1898 
320 North Hamilton Street 
HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 
Telephones — 9856 & 3984 



I HOWELL MANUFACTURING I 

[ COMPANY | 

= High Grade Combed Yarns 

| Counts 40's to 60's — Cotton Yarns = 

E Warps, Cones and Tubes = 

E = 

= CHERRYVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA = 




from the 




V 



TIEDRIGNT TIE COMPANY 



Manufacturers of 

Fine Neckwear for Men and Boys 



ASHEBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 




For long and 
satisfactory 

Service 

The Excel No. 1000 
Fibre Truck 




This is a sturdy truck upon 
which you can depend for 
long and satisfactory serv- 
ice. Hard and durable, 
smooth Vulcanized Fibre. 
Metal covered top rails. 
Finished slatted wood bot- 
tom. Excellent for Roving 
or Yarn. 



EXCEL 

Textile Supply Go. 

"Excel Trucks Excel" 
LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



60 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 





BLADENBORO COTTON MILLS, Inc. 

Spinners of High Grade 
HOSIERY, UNDERWEAR AND WARP YARNS 
2's to 30's, Single and Ply 
BLADENBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



The SHAMROCK 
Damask Mill 

Manufacturers of 

BED SPREADS and 
DRAPERY FABRICS 

Landrum, S. C. 




UNITED MILLS 
CORPORATION 

Mt. Gilead, N. C. 

New York Office: 180 Madison Ave. 



Browning Belting & Supply Company, Inc. 

KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Manufacturers of 
Leather Belting and Textile Specialties 



KNIVES AND SAWS 


BELTING SUPPLIES 


TRANSMISSION SUPPLIES 


V-BELTS IN STOCK 


RUBBER BELTING 


STERLING MOTORS 


CONVEYOR BELTING 


ALLIS-CHALMERS MOTORS 



The wedding will take place in 
November. 

Now that the Jewish Community 
of Wilson have vacationed through 
the summer months, everyone is 
filled with enthusiasm and eager to 
work for the many important factors 
during the months that lie ahead. 



ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 




WHOLESALE MILL AND MINE SUPPLIES 



Mrs. Kenneth Berk, Correspondent 

P. F. C. and Mrs. Robert Raskin 
announce the birth of a son. Randy 
David, born June 11th, Buckroe 
Beach, Va. Congratulations to Bob 
and Beverly, as well as to the new 

J 7 

grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 
Raskin of Tarboro. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Berk have 
returned from a combined business 
and pleasure trip to New York. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Levy have as 
their guests their daughter and son- 
in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Howard 
Kouzel of Washington, D. C. 

Va c a t i o n i n g at Wrightsville 
Beach this months are Mr. and Mrs. 
T. D. Levy and children ... at Vir- 
ginia Beach is Mrs. Sam Justa and 
children ... At Carolina Beach arc 
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Tonkel, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ben Silk. 

Dr. and Mrs. Herbert Fuerst 
have as their guests, Mr. Fuerst's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Alex Fuerst 
of New York. 

Sherril Ann Kellert, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Erie Kellert, partici- 
pated in the Pinetops Horse Show, 
winning a second prize in the Open 
Pleasure Class, and third place in 
the Senior Equestrian Class. She 
was riding "Snow Flakes", owned by 
C. Howell, of Enfield, N. C. 



PARRIS ISLAND, S. C. 

A buffet supper was held recently 
in honor of M/Sgt. Herman A. 
Brittman, who is retiring after 27 
years in the Marine Corps. 

M/Sgt. Brittman, who is ending 
his Marine career at the same depot 
at which he took boot training in 
1926, was presented with an en- 
graved lighter as a gift from his 
friends. 

Stationed at Weapons Training 
Battalion since 1949, he has served 
as Battalion Police and Maintenance 
Sergant, and as NCOinC of "A" 



Range, "E" Range, and of the Spe- 
cial Weapons Range. 

Typical of the widely-travelled 
Marine, M/Sgt. Brittman served 
under Smedley Butler in 1927 and 
at Shanghai in 1932. He was a drill 
instructor at San Diego in the mid 
thirties and later saw service with 
the Marines in the Guadalcanal 
campaign. 

He also served with the 3rd Ma- 
rine Division in China immediately 
after the war. During 1946-49 he 
was with the 2nd Marine Division 
as first sergeant of a tank company. 

M/Sgt. Brittman held the rank 
of warrant officer during World War 
II, when he served as an infantry 
line officer. 



COLUMBIA, S. C. 

Mrs. Theodore Solomon, Correspondent 
Mr. and Mrs. L. Berry of Colum- 
bia, announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Libby Jean, to Sam- 
uel H. Weiner, son of Mrs. Sadie 
Warnch and the late Max Weiner 
of Baltimore, Md. The wedding 
date has not yet been set. 

Mrs. Jack Karesh has recently re- 
turned from 4V2 months stay in 
Germany with her husband. She is 
the former Reberta Wengrow, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sam 
Wengrow of Columbia. Jack is 
a staff sergeant in the Air Force 
and is expected to join Reberta 
in the States soon. During her 
stay in Europe, Reberta toured 
Austria, Switzerland, Italy, Paris 
and Holland, and brought back 
(Please Turn to Page 62) 



LaFayette 
Cotton 
Mills 

Manufacturers of 

Fine Jeans 
Pocketings 
Twills 

LAFAYETTE, GEORGIA 

Selling Agents 

J. W. VALENTINE 
COMPANY, Inc. 
40 Worth Street 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



61 



Our Best Wishes to Our Many Friends for a Very Happy 
and Prosperous New Year 

Quality Cotton Yarns 

MACANAL— 16s to 30s Combed 

MORROWEBB— 36s to 50s Combed 

HAMER— 26s to 36s Carded 



Combed and Double Carded 
Knitting and Weaving — Single and Ply 

CONES TUBES SKEINS WARPS 



MACANAL 

TEXTILE CORPORATION 

419 Fourth Avenue, N. Y. 16 MU 94585 

Cable "MAXANAL" N. Y. 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes to All Our 
Many Patrons and Friends for a Happy 
and Prosperous New Year 



CROSS 

COTTON MILLS 
COMPANY 

Double Carded and Combed 
KNITTING YARNS 

MARION, NORTH CAROLINA 



from 



ERLANGER 

MILLS, Inc. 

Fine Quality Rayon Fabrics 



Lexington, N. C. 



Selling Agents 

J. W. VALENTINE CO., Inc. 

40 Worth St. 
New York City 



►'V 



New Year's 

Greetings 

THE HARTSVILLE 
COTTON MILLS 

Manufacturers of 

Combed Broadcloth 

HARTSVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA 
Member Cotton Textile Institute, Inc. 



Selling Agents 
DEERING, MILLIKEN & CO., Inc. 
240 Church Street 
New York, N. Y. 



62 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



; U aiiEBiiaiiiiieiiiiiiiiit!iisiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiDiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiBiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiii|i^ 

'WEAVING CONSULTANTS' 

§ Cotton Mill Machinery Company, Inc. | 

"We Specialize in Weaving Machinery and Equipment" fj 

Office and Warehouse Gastonia Highway {") 
II Post Office Box 915 Telephone 3-4081 |j| 

CHARLOTTE I, NORTH CAROLINA 

llSlllllliEllllllllllllllilElilESIHIiBlillllillllllllllillllllillllllllllllllllllllllilllllillllllllllllill 



COLUMBIA, S. C. 

(Continued from Page 60) 



"Service Is Our Motto" 

Morgan Transportation 

/ncorporo/ec/ 

Irregular Common Carrier 

General Commodities in 45 North Carolina Counties 
1723 N. Tryon St. Dial 3-3232 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



• ATLANTA, GA. 

• CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 

• CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



© COLUMBIA, S. C. 

• GREENVILLE, S. C. 

• RALEIGH, N. C. 



HENRY V. DICK & CO. 

/ncorporofeo' 

WHOLESALE REFRIGERATION — HEATING 
AIR CONDITIONING, PARTS and SUPPLIES 



1423 South Tryon Street 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Phone 3-6665 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes 
from 

SAM SCHWARTZ MACHINERY CORP. 

Textile Machinery and Supplies 

"All Inquiries Given Our Immediate Attention" 
703 South Mint Street Telephones: 3-7764 — 3-7765 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 



many interesting and beautiful sou- 
venirs. She sailed on the S. S. United 
States on her trip over, and re- 
turned on the Holland American 
Lines Groote Beer. 

Norman }. Arnold, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Ben Arnold of 417 Eti- 
wan Ave., received his commission 
as an ensign in the United States 
Navy at Newport, R. I., on Friday, 
July 10, after completing a four 
months' course at the Navy's Offi- 
cers Candidate School. Prior to en- 
tering the Navy, Ensign Arnold was 
associated with Dr. Frank Hype's 
National Sales Research Survey 
University and Riverside Military 
School. It is expected that Ensign 
Arnold will be temporarily stationed 
at San Francisco, after spending 20 
days leave with his family in Co- 
lumbia. 

Out of town visitors to Columbia 
have been numerous during the 
Summer. A few of many are: Mr. 
and Mrs. Herbert Lourie, visiting 
Mr. and Mrs. H. Simon; and Mrs. 
Ben Prager of Washington, D. C, 
visiting her brother and sister-in-law, 
Dr. and Mrs. Leonard Balser. 

During their stay in Columbia, 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Seigerman 
and Mrs. Lena Sunshine of New 
York City, visiting Mr. and Mrs. 
Jeff Sunshine and Mr. and Mrs. El- 
lard Browne of Baltimore, Md., vis- 
iting Mr. and Mrs. Fred Silver; were 
lavishly entertained by their many 
friends. (P. S. Reports are that they 
returned up "Nawth" raving about 
Columbia's Southern hospitality). 
Also, several afternoon parties were 
given in honor of Mrs. Moses Korn- 
blat of Latta, S. C, the former Miss 
Freeda Baker, during her recent 



visit at the home of her mother, 
Mrs. Clara Baker. Mrs. Pete Lotz- 
off of Lima, Ohio, visited her 
mother, Mrs. Jake Baker. She is the 
former Miss Kathryn Baker. 

A son, Karl Mike, was born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Felix Goldberg on 
June 26. 

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Goldstein 
proudly announce the arrival of a 
daughter, Annette Fay, on June 13. 

Young Frankie Lourie, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Sol Lourie recently under- 
went a tonsillectomy operation. 

Among the Columbians visiting 
Miami Beach, Florida, this Summer, 
were Mr. and Mrs. Henry Stern, Mr. 
and Mrs. Harold Rittenberg, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ralph Friedman, Mr. and 
Mrs. Joe Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 
Kligman, Mr. and Mrs. Meyer 
Kline, Mrs. Paul Meyer, Dr. and 
Mrs. Albert Cremer, Mr. and Mrs. 
Saul Kahn, and Mr. and Mrs. Irvin 
Goldstein. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Mild are en- 
joying the wonderful Canada cli- 
mate. Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Kahn 
and Mr. and Mrs. Morris Kline va- 
cationed at Hendersonville, N. C. 

Numerous Columbians also vaca- 
tioned in New York. Among them 
are: Mrs. Carl Cohen, Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Harris, Mrs. Sidney Taylor, 
and Mr. and Mrs. Ben Klein. Mr. 
Klein is associate director of the 
U. S. O. and has recently made his 
home here in Columbia. Also, Mrs. 
Charles Zimmerman visited in New 
York and Massachusetts. 

Mrs. Bess Zaglin spent two weeks 
in Atlantic City, and Mrs. Mannie 
Shensky was with her mother, Mrs. 
Rachael Rose in High Point, N. C, 
during a month of illness. Mrs. 



SPECIAL COFFEE 



KESTER MACHINERY COMPANY 

Serving the Industry Since 1880 
FACTORY AND MILL SUPPLIES 



• Pumps 

• Air Compressors 

• Ball Bearings 

• Saws and Planer Knives 



Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Branch at High Point, N. C. 



• — i 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



63 




As mark of appreciation of many years of active interest and financial support 
by the National Council of Jewish Women, the School of Education of 
Hebrew University in Jerusalem has presented a first edition copy of the 
"Jerusalem Bible" to Mrs. Irving M. Engel, national president of the women's 
organization. Shown at the Council's headquarters in New York are Mrs. 
Engel and Dr. Bernard Cherrick, Director of Organization of Hebrew Uni- 
versity and Acting Executive Vice-President of American Friends of Hebrew 
University, who made the formal presentation in behalf of Prof. Ernest Simon 
and Dr. Alexander Dushkin, of the School of Education of the Hebrew 
University and the Ministry of Education and Culture of Israel. 



Melvin Gergel and Mrs. Florence 
Reyner enjoyed a visit to Myrtle 
Beach, and Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Sei- 
denberg visited relatives in Ver- 
mont. 

Little Bobby Gottlieb, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Jack Gottlieb, helped to 
put his father in business when his 
father, the operator of a burlap bag 
company in Columbia, made him 
a novel clothes-or-toy hamper de- 
signed to teach him to put his toys 
and clothes neatly away. It hangs 
on a special wooden hanger and is 
so handy that many friends asked 
for one: and soon a growing busi- 
ness began. 

Beth Sholem Synagogue proudly 
announces the opening of a nursery 
school. It is open to both Colum- 
bia congregations and will offer 
much in the care of and teaching 
of the pre-school youngsters. 



SAVANNAH, GA. 

Patsy Rose Weil, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Ben S. Weil, of Birming- 
ham, Alabama, was married to 
Charles Adler Collat, son of Mrs. 
Meyer Collat and the late Mr. Col- 
lat, of Savannah. The ceremony was 
performed in Temple Emanu-El, 
Birmingham. 

Margit Kate Friedlander, daugh- 
ter of Dr. and Mrs. Emil Friedland- 
er, of Cincinnati, was married to 
Seymour H. Raskin, son of Mrs. 
Philip Lipstate, of Dallas Texas and 
the late Alex Raskin, of Savannah. 

Millicent Goldberg, daughter of 
Mrs. Flarry Goldberg, and the late 
Mr. Goldberg, became the bride of 
Fred Shelton, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Shelton of New York city. 



2 1 1 1 1 1 III III I II 1 1 111 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 III llllllllllllIIIIIKIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllIIIIflKi 

Specify and Use "j 

KENDRICK BRICK g 

For Permanence — Beauty — Comfort — Safety — Economy S 

KENDRICK I 
BRICK & TILE COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 
Manufacturers of 

£ FACE, COMMON and ROMAN BRICK 

Home Office 
MT. HOLLY, NORTH CAROLINA 



PLANT NO. I PLANT NO. 2 PLANT NO. 3 

Phone 75-M Phone I Shaleton, N. C. 

Mt. Holly, N. C. Mt. Holly, N. C. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinrr 



More People Buy 

rcaVictor 

Than Any Other Television 

Visit Your RCA Victor Dealer Today 

SOUTHERN RADIO CORPORATION 

RCA Victor Distributor 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



GREETINGS AND BEST WISHES 



from the 



Clark Trailer & Equipment Co., Inc. 

Distributors of Great Dane Trailers 

2201 North Tryon Dial 5-6041 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



LANCE Tasty Food Products 

"Quick Energy" 




LANCE, Inc. 

HOME OFFICE - - - CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



HARRIS EXPRESS, Inc. 

Fast Motor Freight Service Between 
the Carolinas and Eastern Markets 

General Offices — 1425 North Tryon St. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

Principal Terminals 
NEW YORK, N. Y. GREENSBORO, N. C. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. BURLINGTON, N. C. 

PATERSON, N. J. GREENVILLE, S. C. 

SPARTANBURG, S. C. 



64 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



Griggs Trucking Co. 

LONG DISTANCE AND HEAVY HAULING 
Every Load Insured 




Direci Overnight Freight Service 
Between the South and the Industrial East 

General Office 
RUBY, SOUTH CAROLINA 



TERMINALS 

Atlanta, Ga. . Cypress 0573 

Greenville, S. C Phone 3-1664 

Baltimore, Md Hopkins 4687 

Jersey City Phone Journal Square 2-8099 

New York, N. Y Rector 2-9490 

Philadelphia, Pa. Lombard 3-9166 

Charlotte, N. C. Phone 6-4814 

Columbus, Ga Phone 7-4356 

LaGrafige, Ga Phone 7791 



The Old Rabbi Looks at the Rubble 



H.L.BOWERS CO. 



COTTON WASTE 



INC. 

MERCHANTS 




TELEPHONE LOCAL 4-3044 

^w%6ccie& Invited 



L D. 881 




P. O. Box 97 1 Old Pineville and York Rd. 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 



INDUSTRIAL PIPING SUPPLY CO. 



All Types of 
PIPING SUPPLIES 



1 50 1 Dowd Road 6-566 1 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 



(Concluded 

the flowering quince growing out of 
old Gammel's heart and the blue 
waters of the lake below the hill 
and the cherry blossoms that come 
in April. 

Yes, the five minutes are up, and 
besides I want to catch a little of 
that sunshine before the chill sets 
in. Then I'm going back to the 
apartment for a cup of hot ovaltine. 
and at four I'll take a little nap. Id 
my forty-seven years I never had 
time for afternoon sleeping, but 
now I wonder how I got through 
the day without it. 



from Page 22) 

Next week this will be a parking 
lot. And the Sefer Torah that old 
Tuebingen brought out on a wagon 
from St. Louis will be housed \v 
Utterman's five million dollar 
temple. For how long? I wonder. In 
forty years they'll be talking about 
a new place again, and one of those 
days an old-timer will come along, 
with six thousand sermons behind 
him. and he'll stand there, watch- 
ing the bricks fall . . . four decades 
out of a thousand years, he'll think: 
no, here they didn't keep it long, 
and he'll ask himself where are thev 
taking it now . . . 



American Notables — Julian Mack, 
the Jew of 1925 



By HARRY 

In the turbulent half century of 
1890-1940, Julian W. Mack partici- 
pated in all significant movements 
of American Jewish life. Among 
American Jews drifting towards as- 
similation, he alone achieved leader- 
ship in Zionism. While not origi- 
nal, he was enormously useful as 
judge, humanist, leader, and Zionist 
in implementing the ideas patterned 
by the creative. His education was 
formal and solid. Harvard Law 
School and post-graduate studies at 
Berlin and Leipzig prepared him for 
law practice and professor of law at 
Northwestern and Chicago Univer- 
sities. Elected in 1903 to the Cir- 
cuit Court of Cook Count}', he was 
seven years later appointed to the 
Federal bench, from which he re- 
tired in 1941. 

While Circuit Judge, he served 
Chicago's newlv organized Juvenile 
Court, which, together with the 
Denver Court presided over by Ben 



SIMONHOFF 

Lindsey and made famous by Roose- 
velt I, was imitated and emulated 
the world over for its novel methods 
in handling youthful delinquents. 
Psychology and psychiatry were util- 
ized in treating juvenile lawbreakers, 
not as criminals awaiting severe pun- 
ishment, but as victims of condi- 
tions or environment that made 
them what they were. Judge Mack 
became a pioneer in shaping the 
policies and procedure for the Chil- 
dren's Court. He worked with Jane 
Addams of Hull House fame and 
helped Grace Abbott found her Im- 
migrants Protective League. He en- 
couraged the newly developing pro- 
fession of social work and fn 1912 
served as president of their national 
conference. 

Community Leader 
At the turn of the century, Chi- 
cago's Jewish uppercrust was domi- 

(Please Turn to Page 107) 



ii I 




i 



ELECTRIC t GAS CO. 



Serving 23 South Carolina Counties with 
firm, dependable, electric service from 
seven generating plants and a vast net- 
work of transmission and distribution lines. 
An eighth steam electric generating plant 
is now under construction. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



65 



UNITY— AN HISTORICAL IMPERATIVE : : 

By DR. ISRAEL GOLDSTEIN 

In this article, one of the most noted leaders of Jewry, Dr. Israel Gold- 
stein, president of the American Jewish Congress, briefly and compellingly 
describes the genesis of the World Jewish Congress. He presents here more 
than the story of the growth of an international Jewish organization, but rather 
a reasoned and forceful plea for world Jewish unity. Rabbi Goldstein is the 
spiritual leader of New York's Congregation B'nai Jeshrurun and a member of 
the executive of the Jewish Agency. — THE EDITOR. 



i 



Some things are the creature of 
the inventive and imaginative re- 
sources of man; others, the result of 
the irresistible forces of history. The 
World Jewish Congress is the prod- 
uct of both. Although men of vision 
suggested the idea of a World Jew- 
ish Congress at the end of World 
War I, the Congress did not be- 
come a realitv until 1936, when 
black Nazi reaction compelled Jewry 
to unite, as the only hope for sur- 
vival. 

The decision reached in Geneva 
in 1936 to establish the World Jew- 
ish Congress as a permanent institu- 
tion in Jewish life was a decision of 
practical idealism. It affirmed the 
concept of the unity of Jewry in the 
Diaspora and it brought into being 
a vehicle, representative of the Jew- 
ish people, prepared to deal on a 
global scale with Jewish problems of 
a global scope. At the same time, 
Jewry rejected as both obsolete and 
humiliating the 19th century con- 
cept that the survival of the Jew 
was so dependent on the sporadic 
interventions on his behalf by self- 
appointed and self-anointed leaders. 
What the Jew wanted and achieved 
was a voice in the selection of those 
who claimed to have the mandate 
to speak for him. 

The momentous years following 
1936 did not permit the World 
Jewish Congress the leisure of a pe- 
riod of growing up. No sooner was 
the Congress born than it had to as- 
sume the mature role of fighting on 
every front, diplomatic, relief and 
rescue, for the very survival of the 
Jewish people. 

The World Jewish Congress 



emerged from the nightmare of the 
Hitler era disillusioned at the cal- 
lousness of the world which, disre- 
garding its warnings, permitted 
losses of staggering dimensions to be 
inflicted upon the Jewish people. 
However, what it was able to 
achieve in the field of rescue during 
this era made the leaders of the 
Congress even more resolute than 
ever in their convictions that onlv 
through unity in action on the part 
of the constitutcnt elements of 
Jewry can the rights of Jews as 




DR. ISRAEL GOLDSTEIN 

Jews and as human beings be se- 
cured. This principle was recently 
vindicated in the consummation of 
the reparations agreement with 
Germany. It is morally certain that 
were it not for the demands of a 
united Jewry, Germany would not 
have agreed even to this minimal 
offer of indemnification. 

The World Jewish Congress has 
no inflexible ideology. It only seeks 
(Please Turn to Page 68) 



FREDRICKSON 

MOTOR EXPRESS CORP. 

"Serving Norfh Carolina" 




Home Office 
CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 
Phone 6-3661 



Blue Ridge Hdwe. & Supply Co., Inc \ 

. . and . . 

Virginia Machine Tool Company 



Jobbers 



Mill Supplies • Heavy Hardware 
Woodworking Machinery 
Machine Shop Supplies • Cabinet Hardware 
Woodworking Tools 
MARTINSVILLE and BASSETT, VIRGINIA 

"We Specialize in Your Factory Requirements" 



MllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIillllllllllllllllllll 

Y0UNG8L00D TRUCK LINES 

FAST TRANSPORTATION 
Between the Industrial Carolinas 
and the Industrial Midwest 

General Office: Fletcher, N. C. — Phone Arden 2051 



Terminals 

Akron, Ohio, Hemlock 6167 Greensboro, N. C, 4-2728 

Asheville, N. C, 27-2051 Greenville, S. C., 2-2721 

Charleston, S. C., 4-3824 Hickory, N. C., 3123 

Charlotte, N. C, 4-9706 Louisville, Ky., Wabash 6656 

Cincinnati, Ohio, Dunbar 3933 Spartanburg, S. C, 2-4158 

Columbia, S. C, 3-8626 Winston-Salem, N. C, 4-0832 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



Night 2-4777 
Manufacturers 



Night 4-3108 
Repair Service 



Schachner Leather and Belting Co. 

"Schochner Belting Makes a Good Machine Better" 

Telephone 4-131 I 1124 South Mint Street 

P. O. Box 3205 
CHARLOTTE 3, NORTH CAROLINA 



W. CL Jarrell Machine Company 

GENERAL MACHINE REPAIRS 
New Machines Built to Order 
ELECTRIC AND ACETYLENE WELDING 

Phones 3-7189 — 3-7180 Mint and Palmer Streets 

CHARLOTTE I, N. C. 



66 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



DURHAM CONTAINER 
COMPANY 

J. F. Burn ham, Vice-President 
Manufacturers of 

CORRUGATED SHIPPING 
CONTAINERS 



Subsidiary of 
The Jackson Box Co., Cincinnati, Ohio 



2002 East Pettigrew Street 
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 




How 

many 

does it take 



to build a finer Carolina — a stronger America? 
The answer is simple; the requirements, com- 
plex. It takes all of us. All of us working in 
many ways; working in a true spirit of neigh- 
borliness. There is no easy way to build and 
grow with America. It takes work, and, team- 
work. Together, we can do the job. 



HELPING TO BUILD 

(CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY^ 



nran nils row 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes to All Our Many 
Jewish Patrons and Friends for a Happy 
and Prosperous New Year 




SUPER MARKETS 



Carolina Freight Carriers Corp. 

CHERRYVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Serving the Textile and Industrial East 
and Southeast Since 1931 



TERMINALS 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Boston, Mass. 
Jersey City, N. J. 
Trenton, N. J. 
New York, N. Y. 




TERMINALS 

Charlotte, N. C. 
Greensboro, N. C. 
Chester, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Providence, R. I. 
Greenville, S. C. 




INTERSTATE IRREGULAR ROUTE COMMON CARRIERS IN 



Connecticut 
Delaware 
District of 

Columbia 
Florida 



Georgia 
Maryland 
Massachusetts 
New Jersey 
New York 



North Carolina 
Pennsylvania 
Rhode Island 
South Carolina 
Virginia 



Overnight Service From Piedmont Textile Section 
to the Northern Market 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



67 



HAPPY NEW YEAR 

To Our Host of Jewish Friends and Pafrons, 
Best Wishes for a New Year of 
Health and Happiness 

Marcus Loeb & Co., Inc. 

ATLANTA, GEORGIA 




^tslSET SPORTS to*/ 

r fil j ATLANTA, GEORGIAZTz^j^ jUfr&ffi ^ 



SLACKS • SUNSETS • SPORT SHIRTS 



Virginia-North Carolina Representative 
MELVIN LITCH 



South Carolina Representative 
IRVING L. ROBINSON 

Alabama Representative 
JOSEPH LOWENSTEIN 



Georg'.a Representative 
HERBERT ROSENBERG 

Florida Representative 
E. D. COX 



M ississippi-Tennessee Representative 
MELVIN FURCHGOTT 



PET ICE CREAM is smooth 
and creamy, with every flavor 
delicately delicious ! That's be- 
cause PET ICE CREAM is 
made only of fresh whole milk 
and sweet cream, with the 
world's choicest, natural fla- 
vorings! Try some today . . . 
we know you, too, will say 
"PET'S Oh, So Delicious!" 



PET 

ICECREAM 




Compare PET with any other 
ICE CREAM. We know you'll 
agree it's the finest Ice Cream 
you've ever tasted ! 



EAD . 



Nunnally & McCrea Company of Atlanta, and 
Bellgrade Manufacturing Company of Winder, 
manufacturers of Quality Name Brand "ENGI- 
NEER" and "DOUBLE-HEADER" work clothes, 
now combine over 100 years of know-how to 
bring you the best in the work clothing market. 



G TODAY — FOR TOMORROW 



NUNNALLY & McCREA CO. 

Atlanta, Georgia 



BELLGRADE MFG. CO. 

Winder, Georgia 

New York : 3123 Empire State Bldg. 

Chicago: 222 W. Adams Street 

Los Angeles: 401 E. 9th Street 



5£ 

f. 
f. 
I 

d 
t 
I 

t 

4 
i 

S 

; 

q 

q 
'": 



:.; 

% 

:[ 

% 

% 
% 

I 

% 
% 
% 

:; 

t: 

1 

% 1 

5 mm mm m m m mm mmm m mmm mmm m m m-mwmmm m mm- 




FURNITURE 



S 



lores in 



AUGUSTA, GA. 
MACON, GA. 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 

DURHAM, N. C. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 
REIDSVILLE, N. C. 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



EASLEY, S. C. 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 
GREENWOOD, S. C. 

GREER, S. C. 
SPARTANBURG, S. C. 
WILLISTON, S. C. 
BRISTOL, VA. 
DANVILLE, VA. 
MARTINSVILLE, VA. 



Three Quarters of a Century 
of Service to the South 



68 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



Unity — an Historical Imperative 

(Continued from Page 65) 



to be responsive to the principal 
currents of Jewish and world his- 
tory. Representing as it does Jewish 
bodies in more than 60 countries in 
all five continents, it believes in the 
cultural pluralism inherent in this 



type of fusion. The Congress merely 
reserves itself the prerogative to rep- 
resent Jewry in those areas in which 
there is common agreement among 
the affiliated bodies. Within this 
broad frame of reference, the Con- 



Southern Paper Box Co. 



i 



Manufacturers of 

QUALITY FOLDING PAPER BOXES 

Office and Factory 
TAYLORSVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 



VWWVVVWW«WWAVAV.\WA\V. , . , VrtV.Vi\W. , .\WAVM 




Men who really WORK 
Wear Full Gup Overalls! 



Here's 10 Good Reasons Why 

1. Full Cup overalls have new hooded 
bib pockets. They are handy, safe for 
all uses. 

2. Full Cup overalls have full size back 
pockets lined for strength and dura- 
bility. 

3. Full Cup overalls are made from 
high quality nationally known denims 

4. Full Cup overalls have extra strong 
pockets that resist wear and tear — 
2.50 wt. drill. 

5. Full Cup overalls have double sus- 
penders — meaning greater comfort 
... no rolling or twisting. 

6. Full Cup overalls come in graduated 
patterns. There is a smart fit for 
every build. 

7. Full Cup overalls have only first class 
workmanship throughout. 

8. Full Cup overalls are sanforized — 
your guarantee against shrinkage over 
I per cent. 

9. Full Cup overalls have sturdy stitch- 
ing . . . money back if they rip under 
normal usage. 

10. Full Cup overalls are bar tacked 
throughout . . . have extra strength 
at all points of strain. 

Remember, when you want the best in 
overalls, you want Full Cup. This label, 
found in the pocket of very pair, is your 
guarantee. 



COMMERCE MFG. CO. 

Chicago Office — C. W. LOMAX, 222 W. Adams St. 
Main Office and Factory — COMMERCE, GEORGIA 



gress threw its entire weight in the 
struggle for the restoration of the 
Jewish State; it employed the vast 
body of experience and knowledge 
which it gained during the war 
years to help bring before the bar 
of justice the men who had com- 
mitted crimes against humanity; it 
both formulated and pressed for the 
acceptance of the principles of resti- 
tution and indemnification. 

This being an era in which the 
major decisions affecting the future 
of the world are being fashioned 
within the framework of interna- 
tional bodies, the Congress has rec- 
ognized the importance of working 
with these bodies. Having consulta- 
tive status with the Economic and 
Social Council of the United Na- 
tions and with the United Nations 
Educational, Scientific and Cultural 
Organization, the Congress has 
waged a relentless fight for a body 
of principles which would insure a 
more decent world for mankind. 
The Congress has been repeatedly 
acclaimed for its contribution to the 
basic thinking underlying the Con- 
vention on Human Rights, the 
Genocide Convention, the Red 
Cross Convention on the treatment 
of civilians in time of war, and the 
Convention on Refugees. 

The Congress has been in the 
forefront in the defense of the Jew 
against the assaults of anti-Semitism. 
There is no dangerous anti-Semitic- 
movement which is not interna- 
tional in character. Only a truly in- 
ternational Jewish organization com- 



posed of Jewish communities them- 
selves and thus in permanent con- 
tact with Jewish life, only a Jewish 
central bodv which his diplomatic 
and legal experience, and which re- 
ceives an uninterrupted flow of au- 
thentic news which it is able to 
check with objective methods and 
to interpret without exaggeration, 
can have the pretsige, realism and 
tact which are essential to the effi- 
cient representation of Jewish inter- 
ests before the forum of world pub- 
lic opinion. 

The World Jewish Congress has 
only one dogma — the unity of ac- 
tion on the part of the Jewish peo- 
ple through its democratically- 
elected representatives. This is its 
raison d'etre and the goal of all of 
its endeavors. 




Eliezer Greenberg, poet and critic, who 
is the Yiddish press specialist for the 
American Jewish Committee, was an 
official delegate to the 25th Interna- 
tional P.E.N, (poets, essayists and 
novelists) Congress June 8-13. The 
Conference is sponsored by the Inter- 
national P.E.N. Club, a world associa- 
tion of writers, 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



69 



THE JEWS AMONG THE NATIONS 

By DR. I. SCHWARTZBART, Director, Organizations 
Department, World Jewish Congress 

This article was written prior to the Third Assembly of the World Jewish 
Congress on August 4th. 

Dr. Schwarzbart, in this article, dwells on the principles and creed that 
must distinguish any international Jewish organization which is to leave behind 
it a record of lasting value. In ths article, Dr. Schwarzbart analyzes the many 
difficulties which beset the formation and extension of any such organization. 
A former member of the Polish Parliament in 1939 and the former Polish Gov- 
ernment in Exile, Dr. Schwarzbart has been among the foremost in the strug- 
gle to promote and protect Jewish rights and interests here and abroad. — THE 
EDITOR. 



The Third Plenary Assembly of 
the World Jewish Congress has 
been called for August 4 and will 
take place in Geneva, Switzerland. 
The First Constituent Assembly of 
the WJC, which was held in the 
same city in 1936, embodied the ar- 
duous preparations and thought of 
years. For this conference was 
taxed with the paramount responsi- 
bility o festablishing a permanent 
body to coordinate the efforts of the 
Jewish people in defending Euro- 
pean Jewry against the murderous 
onslaught of iHtlerism. The con- 
ference starkly confronted the fact 
that the very existence of the Jew- 
ish people was at stake. 

In 1948, the Second Plenary As- 
sembly of the WJC convened in 
oMntreux in an atmosphere of less 
fearful urgency but of momentous 
significance, nonetheless, to world 
Jewry. It sought to establish a bridge 
between the Jewish communities of 
the free Western world and the 
Jewish communities of Eastern 
Europe. The time then seemed aus- 



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picious for such a development since 
hope still prevailed that cooperation 
between these two worlds was pos- 
sible. However, this belief has thus 
far proved illusory. The rift between 
east and west is reflected in the fact 
that the Jewish communities of 
Eastern Europe and China ceased to 
be affiliates of the World Jewish 
Congress. 

After a five-year interval since the 
last Assembly, the present gathering 
was confronted with radically altered 
conditions on the international po- 
litical scene. It is faced with a num- 
ber of urgent tasks with which it 
must resolutely grapple. 

The interest in this Assembly is 
daily increasing among the rank and 
file of the affiliates of the WJC in 
64 countries — from the largest com- 
munities to the smallest. This in- 
tense interest in itself furnishes 
proof of the necessity of this con- 
ference. Whether this Assembly 
will fulfill such anticipation and 
emerge with results of lasting value 
remains to be seen. The historic sig- 
nificance of a conference which 
comes to grips with the vital prob- 
lems of a living and struggling peo- 
(Please Turn to Page 77) 

During the years of the Second 
Temple the new month would be 
announced by messengers who kept 
watch over the moon in Jerusalem. 
Messengers would then be sent to 
the Jewish communities "chutz 
l'aaretz" to advise them of the ap- 
proaching holidays. Because it was 
realized that the messengers might 
arrive too late the practice devel- 
oped among the outside communi- 
ties to add a day to the holidays, a 
practice which still exists in Jewish 
communities outside of Israel. This 
custom, however, was never applied 
to Yom Kipper, probably because it 
involves fasting on two days. Yet the 
Talmud records that there were in 
fact many pious Jews who observed 
Yom Kippur two successive days. 
The two-day custom was observed 
by many Jews in Germany during 
the Middle Ages, and there are dis- 
tant Jewish communities today still 
adhering to that practice. 



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Most housewives consider the 
holiday season the appropriate time 
to switch from the lighter menus 
of summer to more substantial 
meals. Here are a few recipes that 
come under that category. 

ROAST TURKEY 

Singe and clean the turkev the 
same as chicken. Fill with plain 
bread stuffing or chestnut stuffing. 
Tie down the legs and rub entire 
surface with salt and let stand over- 
night. Next morning place in large 
drippings or roasting-pan on rack 
and spread breast, legs and wings 
with one-third cup of fat creamed 
and mixed with one-fourth cup of 
flour. Dredge bottom of pan with 
flour. Place in a hot oven and 
when the flour on the turkev begins 
to brown, reduce the heat and add 
two cups of boiling water or the 
stock in which the giblets are cook- 
ing, and baste with one-fourth cup 
of fat and three-fourths cup of boil- 
ing water. When this is all used, 
baste with the fat in the pan. Baste 
every fifteen minutes until tender; 
do not prick with a fork, press with 
the fingers; if the breast meat and 
leg are soft to the touch the turkev 
is done. If the oven is too hot, 
cover the pan; turn the turkey often, 
that it may brown nicely. Remove 
strings and skewers and serve on 
hot platter. Serve with giblet sauce 
and cranberry sauce. If the turkev 
is very large it will require three 
hours or more, a small one will re- 
quire only an hour and a half. 

STUFFED TURKEY NECK 

Take neck of turkey, stuff with 
following: One-quarter pound of al- 
monds or walnuts chopped fine and 
seasoned with chopped parslev, pep- 
per and salt, put two hard-boiled 
eggs in the centre of this dressing; 
stuff neck, sew up the ends and 
when roasted slice across so as to 
have a portion of the hard-boiled 
egg on each slice; place on platter 
and surround with sprigs of parsley. 

ROAST GOOSE 

All goose meat tastes bettter if it 
is well rubbed with salt, ginger and 
a little garlic a day previous to using. 

Stuff goose with bread dressing, or 
chestnut dressing, a dressing of ap- 
ples is also very good. Sew up the 



goose, then line a sheet-iron roasting- 
pan with a few slices of onion and 
celery and place the goose upon 
these, cover closely, roast three hours 
or more, according to weight. If the 
goose browns too quickly, cover with 
greased paper or lower the heat of 
the oven. Baste every fifteen min- 
utes. 

ROAST MUTTON 
WITH POTATOES 

Take a shoulder of mutton — must 
be voung and tender — wash the 
meat well and dry with a clean 
towel. Rub well with salt, ginger 
and a speck of pepper, and dredge 
well with flour. Lav it in a covered 
roasting-pan. Put a few pieces of 
whole mace and a few slices of 
onion on top; pour a cup of water 
into the pan. Cover it up tight and 
set in a hot oven to roast, basting 
frequently. Allow twenty minutes 
to the pound for roasting mutton; it 
should be well done. Add more 
water if necessary (always add hot 
water so as not to stop the process 
of boiling), skim the gravy well and 
serve with current or cranberrv jelly. 
Pare potatoes of uniform size and 
wash and salt them about three- 
quarters of an hour before dinner. 
Lay the poatoes in pan around the 
roast and sprinkle them with salt 
and return to the oven to roast. Let 
them brown nicely. 

BREAST OF MUTTON 
STEWED WITH CARROTS 

Salt the mutton on both sides, 
adding a little ground ginger; put on 
to boil in cold water, cover up 
tightlv and stew slowly. In the 
meantime pare and cut up the car- 
rots, add these and cover up again. 
Pare and cut up about half a dozen 
pottatoes into dice shape and add 
them three-quarters of an hour be- 
fore dinner. Cover up again, and 
when done, make a sauce as follows: 
Skim off about two tablespoons of 
fat from the mutton stew, put this 
in a spider and heat. Brown a table- 
spoon of flour in the fat, add a heap- 
ing tablespoon of brown sugar, some 
cinnamon and pour the gravy of the 
stew into the spider, letting it boil 
up once, and then pour all over the 
carrots and stew until ready to serve. 

White turnips may be used in- 
stead of carrots. 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



71 




J-UE VIRGINIA REPORTER 




NEWS OF THB STATE BY OUTLOOK CORRESPONDENTS 



RICHMOND, VA. 




Jewish War Veterans 




Dr. Milton D. Cummins, Correspondent 

Commander Arthur Sesholtz of 
Richmond Post 155, Jewish War 
Veterans of the United States, has 
issued the following pronouncement 
which is of primary importance to 
every American, veterans and non- 
veterans, Jews and non-Jews. 

He states, "State Department 
vacillation in the Near East is seri- 
ously prejudicing American pres- 
tige." Commander Sesholtz con- 
tends that "weakness in American 
policy, as evidenced in our relation- 
ship with the Arab states is part of 
a pattern of American weakness all 
over the world which threatens 
American leadership in world af- 
fairs." 

"When a Syngman Rhee in Korea 
or a military dictator in Lebanon un- 
dertakes to push the United States 
around, it is time to ask ourselves 
whether something has not been 
lacking in the State Department's 
administration of American foreign 
policy. The spectacle of countries 
all over the world, large and small, 
manifesting open contempt for the 
United States is a disheartening one 
and sufficient proof to us that new 
firmness and clarity of purpose in 
State Department policy is vital if 
the United States is to retain her 
position of leadership on the inter- 
national scene." 

Commander Sesholtz continues, 
"with special reference to the Mid- 
dle East, the American Secretary of 
State has come back with a cautious, 
fence-straddling statement which in- 
dicates that same weakness in deal- 
ing with a critical part of the world. 



We have watched the Lebanese look 
Mr. Dulles right in the eye and say, 
'We don't want peace, and there 
isn't going to be any peace'. We 
then have seen Mr. Dulles accept 
that, return to the United States 
and with a great show of equal treat- 
ment which had no basis in fact, 
state that all of the countries in the 
Middle East, Israeli and Arab alike, 
must be careful not to irritate each 
other and must find a way to live 
in unity and peace." 

"This ignores the fact that the 
Israeli government has offered to 
join in a common Near East defense 
pact with the Western powers 
against Russia and has offered to be 
our allv in every sense, including a 
military one, while the Arab states 
have not. Putting them upon an 
equal basis and refusing to recog- 
nize this distinction is a flight from 
reality, which we believe to be one 
of the most serious defects in State 
Department thinking." 

"It has been long standing United 
States policy to create a Near East 
defense organization for the two- 
fold purpose of achieving peace in 
that area and establishing an effec- 
tive force against Communism. Lack 
of strength in implementing that 
policy has resulted in American fail- 
ure in that area of the world. Secre- 
tary Dulles' statement that a Middle 
East defense pact could only come 
about when all of the countries in 
that area, meaning the Arab coun- 
tries, wanted it, is equally weak. It 
is a surrender of the idea because the 
Secretary well knows that such in- 
spiration from the Arab states will 
not be forthcoming. The only coun- 
try in the Near East prepared to join 
in a defense pact with the Western 
powers has been and continues to be 
ISRAEL." 

"No slanted thinking can alter 
this fact and no rationalization can 
cover up the failure of the State De- 
partment to adopt a strong policy in 
furthering the development of a 
Near East Treaty Organization. The 
Jewish War Veterans of the United 
States has already presented to the 




COMMANDER ARTHUR SESHOLTZ 

State Department a plan which 
would accomplish this, a plan so 
forceful in its simplicity that it 
would afford a solution to the Near 
East impasse. That plan is to recog- 
nize as of this moment those coun- 
tries in the Near East which are will- 
ing to join hands with the United 
States, to take them in as allies and 
to arm them as allies. To refuse a 
strong and willing ally such as Israel 
has been for the purpose of appeas- 
ing a hostile and unwilling neighbor 
in that area, is sheer foolishness and 
is certain to bring us to the end 
result of all appeasement policies." 

It behooves us all to read the 
foregoing statement carefully and 
do what we can to influence this 
present policy which is lacking in 
firmness and definition of purpose. 



J. W. V. AUXILIARY 

Mrs. Lawrence Schain, Correspondent 

The first activity of the Ladies 
Auxiliary in August started off with 
their usual good deed — a visit to 
cheer hospitalized veterans at Mc- 
Guire Veterans Administration Hos- 
pital. Besides the regular wards 
these ladies service, a new ward has 
been added — a tubercular ward. Na- 
turally, hospital offficials would not 
allow these ladies to enter this tu- 
bercular ward if there were the 
remotest sign of contagion. Mrs. 
Sam (Naomi) Aaron reported how 
utterly delighted these boys were in 
being visited; they were so grateful 
it was almost embarrassing — which 
only proves how they long for visit- 
ors and cheering up. 



Again, on August 10, another visit 
was made to McGuire, only this 
time all assembled in the huge Rec 
Hall for entertainment by a hill- 
billy band. This was under spon- 
sorship of the Ladies Auxiliary, and 
the audience reaction was spontane- 
ous and terrific. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard (Freda) 
Lipsius were hosts to the Ladies 
Auxiliary and the Post the night of 
August 12th at an evening picnic at 
their home. Mrs. Lipsius is presi- 
dent of the Ladies Auxiliary and 
Howard is a member of the Post. 
A most enjoyable get-together was 
had by the men and women of both 
organizations. 

On August 18 the monthly visit 
to Camp Pickett was made by mem- 
bers of the Ladies Auxiliary. The 
men received their usual refresh- 
ments and little gifts and played 
bingo and had a good time. 

The last event on the August cal- 
endar was the executive board meet- 
ing on the 25th, held at the new 
home of Mrs. Max (Syd) Schwartz- 
burg. 

Miss Marjorie Wrenn (by-lined as 
Margie Wren), Fashion Editor of 
the Times-Dispatch, was our most 
interesting guest speaker. She gave 
an illustrated talk on "Fashion 
Trends as They Affect You." 



Beth Abadah Sisterhood 

Mrs. L. Steiner, Correspondent 

Remember last year's Beth 
Ahabah Sisterhood's terrific Ways 
and Means Dinner and Show? Now 
they're planning to do it again! The 
theme for this year should prove 
loads of fun as it's a Gay 90's Re- 
vue; Can-Can and all. I bet even 
the husbands are angious to see this. 
No wonder the Co-Chairmans: Miss 
Rosalie Schwarzschild, Mrs. Allan 
Creeger and Mrs. Leonard Policoff 
are planning to have it run two 
nights: Tuesday, October 13 and 
Wednesday, October 14th, at the 
Beth Ahabah Social Center. Mrs. 
Robert Reinhard, our new Assistant 
Treasurer, is in charge of tickets. 

Speaking of new officers, we've 
got a grand crew this year: President, 



72 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



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RICHMOND, VA. 
Beth Sholom Home 




Mrs. Fritz Lowenthal, Correspondent 

On July 19, 1953, the Beth Sho- 
lom Home for the Aged held its 
state-wide board meeting in Vir- 
ginia Beach. The meeting took 
place in the beautiful and air-con- 
ditioned Temple Emanuel. 

Thanks to Mr. Morris Lcgum, 
his co-workers, and their wives, we 
enjoyed a delicious lunch. Thank 
you very much Norfolk board mem- 
bers for your wonderful hospitality. 

We had a nice meeting at which 
time the most important point on 
the agenda was discussed. "The ad- 
dition to the present building" 
which is so verv much needed. 
That's what this writer had to say 
about the present situation. 

In my opinion it is important for 
all of you to know about the good 
times our residents have in our 
Home, and also, the problems the 
residents and we have to face. 

One cannot say enough about the 
Sisterhood, whose members are con- 
stantly inspired by the untiring work 
of their President, Honorary Presi- 
dent, and other Officers to give par- 
ties and bring entertainment to our 
residents. Our newspaper is still go- 
ing strong under the very capable 
supervision of its editor, and co- 
editor, Mrs. Louis Goodstein, and 
Mrs. Sam Batt. But parties, televi- 
sion, and the home newspaper are 
not enough. To understand the sit- 
uation, trv to put yourself in the 
place of our residents. They, like 
you now, were leading a busy and 
useful life. Suddenly for some rea- 
son beyond their control, they live 
in a home with little, if nothing, to 
do. Even so, they say, O! well, I 
am old, I cannot do anything any 
more. They are wrong. Some of 
them might have hidden talents 



which could be brought out on the 
surface and give them a new out- 
look on life. Proof was given to us 
when we visited the Hebrew Home 
For The Aged in Atlantic City last 
May at which time my husband and 
I attended a Conference of Admin- 
istrators of Old Age Homes. The 
articles shown to us were made by- 
men and women who are over 80 
years old and who never before pro- 
duced anything like it. You see, 
under guidance of a trained thera- 
pist who would know how to ap- 
proach the old people, and the help 
of volunteers, a whole lot could be 
accomplished. The lack of Therapy, 
but most of all, the lack of space, 
bring most of the problems about. 
The biggest problem is, that we are 
not able to separate the well from 
those who are less fortunate. When 
you enter our Home, you meet peo- 
ple who are alert, physically, and 
mentally competent, but you also 
see those who don't realize anymore 
what is going on. You, as a visitor, 
become depressed, but can you im- 
agine how depressing it is for our 
residents who are always faced with 
what might be their tomorrow. 

Privacy is a very important factor 
especially for old people. Our old 
people don't have any because 3 
and 4 people are sleeping in one 
room. They are always looking for- 
ward to having visitors; the person 
who receives the visitor, has to share 
same with the rest of the residents. 
There is no real private place where 
they can tell us their problems; even 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



73 




The first consignment of phosphates for export from the mines of Israel's 
"Big Crater," which are being exploited with the assistance of funds from the 
sale of the State of Israel Bond Issue, is shown being loaded aboard the Israeli 
vessel "Rimon" at the port of Haifa. The trial shipment of 500 tons, which 
was sent to Italy, is expected to be the forerunner of a series of shipments 
which will constitute an important element in Israel's twenty-year "master 
plan' for the utilization of its mineral resources. 



if they are small ones, to them, they 
are important, and they feel that 
they should be handled secretly. 
Surely, that is not too much to ask 
for, but as it is right now, it cannot 
be done. 

Another very important factor, is 
that our infirmary needs to be much 
larger. I could go on and on, in- 
stead of doing so, let me summarize 




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it. The fact being together, day in 
and day out with mental patients, 
having nothing worthwhile to do, 
and having no privacy at all, makes 
our ladies and gentlemen who under 
other circumstances could be a real 
asset to the community, unhappy, 
moodv and ill. They get in each 
other's hair, because, they need an 
outlet like every normal human be- 
ing. Statistics show that people are 
going to live longer and longer. Let 
us be prepared, let us not rest nor 
rust, let us work hard together with 
the President of our beautiful Beth 
Sholom Home towards a happier, 
healthier, and more useful tomorrow 
of our residents. 



Council Jewish Women 

Mrs. David J. Greenberg, Correspondent 

As one part of the Freedom Cam- 
paign, run jointly with the Y. W. 
C. A., the National Council of 
Jewish Women, sponsored this past 
academic year a nation-wide essay 
contest for college seniors on "The 
Meaning of Academic Freedom." 
At the Triennial Convention of the 
Council, Thurman Griswold pre- 
sented the two prize winning seniors 
with awards of $2500 for first prize 
and $1500 for second place. 

It is our pleasure to publish else- 
where in this issue extracts from the 
first prize essay of Stanley A. Wol- 
pert, of The College of the City of 
New York. Mention of Mr. Wol- 
pert's award was made in our Aug- 
ust issue. 

Extracts are also presented of the 
second prize essay of Richard Nelson 
Clewell, of Franklin and Marshall 
College. 




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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



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'The Guilt Makers" 

(Continued from Page 41) 



him a suppressed desire for revenge? 

The author takes his central char- 
acter, Saul Swoboda, a young Jew- 
ish boy, out of the Buchenwald 
Concentration Camp and lets him 
loose in New York City. The boy 
loves freedom to extraction and 
worships at the Shrine of the God- 
dess of Liberty. Every sign of Amer- 
ican life which shows him the denial 
of unlimited freedom brings back to 
him an uncontrollable impulse to 
smash the Concentration Camp be- 
fore it is built. For him there is no 
America, or Declaration of Indepen- 
dence, No Bill of Rights, unless he 
can see absolute equality in this 
country. 

We know that the idea of equal- 
ity is limited by human weaknesses 
and by inherited prejudices which 
are not easy to overcome. We are 
ready to rationalize and to become 
indifferent. But Saul is conscious 
of only one thing: namely, he sur- 
vived four years of wretched Con- 
centration Camp treatment for but 
a single purpose — to be a free man. 
He struggled against the hazardous 
odds of Nazi domination to prove 
to his own young soul that man can 
be free. In his ardent, youthful en- 
thusiasm, he set out to prove it to 
the entire world, just as the math- 
ematician proves that 2 and 2 are 
4. For four years after the boy is 
liberated form Buchenwald, he trav- 
els the length and breadth of Eur- 
ope but finds only disappointment. 
America, with its sacred history and 
vast promise, then, becomes the 
goal of his longing and the fulfill- 
ment of his search. 

It was a mistake to have him 



land and remain in New York City, 
with its tensions and complex pop- 
ulation. Just as he sought refuge 
in free America, so did also ex-Nazis 
and other men of ill will find safety 
in New York and a fertile breeding 
place for their hatreds and preju- 
dices. 

From the time Saul is liberated 
in Buchenwald he is attracted in 
friendship to Sergeant David Hutch- 
inson, who attempts to mold him 
into an acceptance of American life. 
The Sergeant, or Mr. David as Saul 
calls him in New York, becomes the 
refugee boy's mainstay, who tries 
to keep the violent tempered Saul 
calm and reasonable. Many influ- 
ences, however, militant against 
David's success. 

First there is Saul's uncle Mar- 
shall Persoff. He signed the nec- 
essary affidavit to be responsible 
for Saul in this country, a n d he 
takes this responsibility seriously. It 
is uncle Marshall who maintains 
without compromise the first idea 
I mentioned in this lecture: namely, 
that the Jew is responsible for his 
own troubles. They are brought on 
by the Jew's lack of faith, by a be- 
trayal of the ancient Covenant of 
the Lord. 

Uncle Persoff is a wholesale 
butcher who, with the best of inten- 
tions, even feeling that he might 
make Saul a partner in his well-pay- 
ing business, insists that Saul follow 
the trade of a butcher. This proves 
unfortunate because of the brutal 
memories of Buchenwald which it 
brings back to him. Saul would like 
any job where he may express him- 
self as a mechanic and use his skill- 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



75 



ful hands. To the practical and un- 
imaginative Persoff, this is sheer 
foolishness. 

The climax of the story is brought 
about by another very innocent cir- 
cumstance. His friend David is an 
athletic coach in a Community Cen- 
ter which is unfortunately located 
in the slums of Yorkville. 

Those who know New York will 
recognize Yorkville as a densely pop- 
ulated German settlement where 
Nazism was once prominent and 
where it is still preached with a good 
of impudence. It is natural that 
David bring Saul to the Community 
Center, where he distinguishes him- 
self both as a mechanic and athlete. 
The rowdies of the Center and the 
Yorkville anti-Semitic elements are 
aroused against him — even more sav- 
agely because he can best them at 
their own rough and brutal games. 

The Community Center execu- 
tive, Wesley Roland, is a typical 
social worker. Also he is more Orth- 
odox Freudian Psychoanalist than 
Freud himself was. He was even 
more dangerous because of his ama- 
teur standing and his love for hyp- 
notism. David Hutchinson felt and 
advised that the use of moral en- 
couragement and friendly direction, 
would give Saul a sense of belonging 
and security. Roland is sure that 
Saul suffers from an obsessional 
neurosis developed in the Concen- 
tration Camp. The remedy he pre- 
scribes is to pry into Saul's subcon- 
scious past in order to release his 
mental tensions. 

Roland clumsily tampers with the 
boy's subconsciousness and sug- 
gests a guilt complex of which Saul 
had never dreamt. The amateur 
hypnoanalyst eggs Saul on to such 
an extent that he loses all control 
of himself. In a half hypnotic state 
he stumbles on to a street corner 
meeting in Yorkville, where an anti- 



Semite is arousing the audience to 
the highest pitch of hatred. Blindly, 
the young Jew staggers toward the 
platform and chokes and beats the 
rabble-rouser to death with his bare 
hands. 

Limited space makes this outline 
of the story over-simplified. David's 
love for Katherine Metcalf, for ex- 
ample, deserves much more consid- 
eration. Our girls are conditioned 
to share the love of their men with 
their country, with their patriotic 
duty. But when David asks Kay to 
share his love for her with his sense 
of duty, with his devotion to Saul 
who requires so much time and di- 
rection, it is human enough for the 
girl to rebel. 

The time element also forces me 
to neglect the characterization in 
this novel; the misguided honesty 
of Uncle Marshall, the simple no- 
bility of his wife, Aunt Leah, and 
many more. But then, my purpose 
is only to introduce you to the 
GUILT MAKERS, not to save you 
from reading it. It is wise to let the 
author remind us of the outrages 




Rabbi Simon G. Kramer, of New York, 
has been named chairman of the 
Tercentenary Committee on Religious 
and Educational Participation to plan 
religious and educational activities for 
the observance in 1954 of the 300th 
anniversary of Jewish settlement in the 
United States. 




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76 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



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of Buchenwald in all their barbarity 
and naked squalor, in passages 
which fill us with disgust and ter- 
ror. 

My chief reason for recommend- 
ing the book lies in the two-fold 
challenge which the author throws 
out. I have already discussed the 
first one, Uncle PersofFs gloomy 
forboding that we Jews are punish- 
ed for our guilt. Perhaps Aunt 
Leah's naive conclusion is the most 
satisfactory and even most pro- 
found. She says, God did not tell 
the Germans to butcher the Jews. 

The second challenge is one that 
we can really do something about. 
The author raised the question, Am 
1 my brother's keeper? While Saul 
Swoboda is the hero of the tale, 
David is its protagonist; and David 
answers yes. Whoever says NO is a 
guilt maker. But I have a conviction 
about this matter. 

After 1952 elections Time Mag- 
azine printed a sarcastic article 
about the followers of Governor 
Stevenson, and called them egg 
heads. The attack was naturally up- 
on the liberals of this country and 
the world. I do not share that writ- 
er's opinion, but I have my own 
criticism of liberals; namely, that 
they are not articulate. A liberal 
must be an out and out liberal; 
under all circumstances. 

We must face facts. Anti-Semites 
and frustrated Nazis of Yorkville 
are Americans. Senator McCarthy 
is an American. President Eisen- 
hower is an American. So is Gover- 
nor Stevenson; so are 45% of Amer- 
ican electors who voted the Demo- 
cratic ticket. 

All who do not betray us are 
Americans. Whose opinion, then 
shall prevail? 

To me a liberal is one who takes 
the world to his heart. David, in the 
story of the Guilt Makers, was a lib- 
eral. But the difference is that 
David was a true liberal. He sacri- 



ficed position, ambition to become 
a writer, and even the girl he loved, 
because he felt that he was his bro- 
ther's keeper. Most of us liberals, 
however, betray our cause. We di- 
vide our liberalism. If Germany, or 
China, or Czechoslovakia is expos- 
ed to butchery we say nothing about 
it — as long as we are free and pros- 
perous. We become liberals only 
when our own position and securi- 
ty are attacked. Such half-way lib- 
eralism will never prosper. The re- 
actionary who wants his mess of 
pottage is sincere and hews to the 
line. 

For at least a glimpse of the 
dawning of the Day of God and His 
Kingdom on earth, liberals must be- 
come liberalized. They must rec- 
ognize that all men are children of 
God. That and that alone will make 
them give an active affirmation to 
the question, Am I my brother's 
keeper? 

In ancient days it was customary 
to wear white robes on Yom Kip- 
pur, since the color white is a sym- 
bol of rejoicing. This custom is still 
retained, though in most communi- 
ties it is only the cantor, the rabbi 
and the extremely pious who wear 
white kaftans, or kittels. In ex- 
tremely Orthodox synagogues, most 
women wear white dresses or at least 
white shawls. 




Sidney G. Kusworm, Treasurer of B'nai 
Brith and chairman of the Americanism 
Committee of the Ohio Bar Associa- 
tion, who will head a special committee 
to plan future activities of B'nai B'rith 
Institutes for Judaism. 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



The Jews Among the Nations 

(Continued from Page 69) 



pie can be measured only after the 
passage of time. The first Zionist 
Congress in 1897, for instance, be- 
came a historic Congress only on 
May 15, 1948, when the State of 
Israel was proclaimed and became a 
reality. 

On the other hand, another 
world-wide conference — the Evian 
conference, in Julv 1938 — seemed to 
have eervthing in its favor to pro- 
duce such historic results but actu- 
ally left no imprint on history. 

What then are the elements 
which must go into a conference to 
produce results of lasting conse- 
quence? This question is being 
turned over by the World Jewish 
Congress as it approaches its Third 
Assembly. 

To begin with: It is axiomatic 
that not even the mightiest nations 
are or can afford to be totally inde- 
pendent. This rule applies with 
added force to such non-govern- 
mental organizations like the World 
Jewish Congress which seeks to weld 
into unity a dispersed people. This 
aim is dependent on a host of vari- 
able factors, among them the spe- 
cific conditions in every country of 
which the Jewish community is and 
will remain a loyal entity, ever- 
changing international conditions, 
and sheer geographic difficulties. It 
was Chaim Weizmann who once 
remarked that our people's fight for 
a better life is essentially a fight 
against geography. 

These very factors create many 
difficulties when the World Jewish 
Congress seeks to implement its 
cherished principle of organizational 
democracy, but it does all within its 
power to maintain this principle. 



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During its 17 years of existence, 
the WJC has successfully helped a 
number of Jewish communities to 
organize themselves into over-all rep- 
resentative bodies, governed by men 
or women elected either by individ- 
ual ballots or through the election 
slates of various Jewish organiza- 
tions. To cite but one instance of 
these democratic procedures: In 
Chile, the organization affiliated to 
the WJC, and numbering 30,000 
members, elected delegates to the 
Third Plenary Assembly bv inviting 
representative sof 60 Jewish organi- 
zations in the capital and in the 
provincial communities to a confer- 
ence at which the elections were 
held. Naturally, this desirable 
method cannot be everywhere ap- 
plied. For the principle is adhered 
to wherever local conditions permit. 
Thus the WJC constantly tries to 
act in accordance with democratic 
practices and not let them remain 
empty and formal regulations. 

Similarly, the WJC creed that all 
Jews should become conscious and 
active members of their communi- 
ties, be given a voice and the oppor- 
tunity to participate in the shaping 
of Jewish life, was demonstrated in 
determining the agenda of the 
Third Plenary session by the Execu- 
tive of the WJC. All the WJJC 
affiliates in the 64 countries were in- 
vited to forward their comments 
and suggestions to a preliminary 
agenda of the Assembly. The final 
agenda submitted to the Assembly 
bv the Executive incorporates these 
suggestions. Hence, the agenda, the 
mainstay of the Assembly, will be 
the result of the joint effort of the 
far-flung affiliates of the WJC and 
its Executive. 

The principle of equality is sin- 
cerely observed by the WJC which 
makes no distinction between Jews 
who protect and Jews who are pro- 
tected, between rich or poor, or be- 
tween Ashkenazim and Sephardim. 
In carrying out this cardinal princi- 
ple of WJC philosophy, the WJC 
strives to undo as far as possible the 
difficulties created by history which 
resulted in the dispersion of the 
Jewish people. 

The Executive ' of the WJC, 
which numbers 50 members, is com- 
posed of representatives from our 
larger affiliates in 15 countries. Only 
one other Jewish organization can 
boast of a similar democratic organ- 
ization, the World Zionist Organi- 
zation. This similarity naturally 
brings these two Jewish bodies close 

(Please Turn to Page 79) 




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78 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



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(Concluded from Page 47) 




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governments of friendly powers. 
The American-Israel partnership has 
been the central pillar in the edifice 
of our international friendship, and 
it so remains. President Eisen- 
hower's expression of hope to see 
this friendship develop "at full tide" 
in the years ahead strikes a respon- 
sive echo in our hearts. I am satis- 
fied that most of the principles 
which I have expounded here come 
together on common ground with 
assurances and commitments made 
on behalf of the United States. We 
are as one on the need for peace, 
and we are told on their behalf that 
there is no basic difference in the 
general character of the peace which 
they and we should like to see. 

On the relatively small but im- 
portant area in which there may be 
a divergent approach reflecting the 
different character and scale of our 
viewpoints, I see a clear possibility 
of bridging the gap, as so many gaps 
have been bridged in years gone by. 
The foundations of their friendship 
are firm and enduring and consti- 
tute a strong platform for the har- 
monious exchange of opinions and 
ideas on issues still unresolved. It 
must be remembered that with all 
due deference to the opinion of 
friendly governments, the security 
of our land and homes is in the last 
resort the responsibility of Israel's 



elected government. It will dis- 
charge that responsibility, giving full 
weight to international interests and 
opinion, but relying on its own 
unique and indivisible duty. Special 
respect and deference are due by 
friendly governments to those poli- 
cies and attitudes which my gov- 
ernment adopts on grounds of its 
national security, for this is the 
realm in which no other experience 
or responsibility can compare with 
ours. This is a matter in which we 
have always been alone. No power 
or group of powers managed to 
prevent the assault of Arab govern- 
ments upon us, and we fought alone 
against the peril of extrication. In- 
ternational influence is still unable 
to liberate us from illicit blockade 
and from constant eruptions of mur- 
derous violence on our frontiers. 
The sincerely expressed will of 
friendly governments has not yet 
availed to bring us the peace set- 
tlement to which we sincerely as- 
pire. Nor have the burdens of our 
defense yet been relieved by the 
assistance which many of our sister 
democracies have received for the 
protection of their liberties and in- 
dependence. In these circumstances, 
the contribution which we can make 
towards the restoration of peace 
must be conditioned by our basic 
care for our territorial integrity and 
our survival and security. 



B'nai B'rit h Adopts Institute Program 

Adoption of the Institutes of 
Judaism program as a B'nai B'rith 
project as announced on August 
20th by Philip M. Klutznick, Presi- 
dent of B'nai B'rith. The program 
was adopted by the B'nai B'rith ad- 
ministrative committee at its meet- 
ing in Asheville, North Carolina, 
August 9-11, and several plans were 
taken under consideration which 
would allow for growth as rapidly 
as possible commensurate with the 
high standards of the Institutes. 



The Institutes of Judasim have been 
described as the most dynamic plan 
for adult Jewish education devel- 
oped so far. 

Plans for expansion of the Insti- 
tutes program were prepared by a 
special committee headed by Sidney 
G. Kusworm of Dayton, Ohio, 
Treasurer of B'nai B'rith. 

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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



79 



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JEWISH EDUCATION MONTH: SEPT. 8— OCT. 8, 1953 



When you 

BNROLL 

them in a 
Jewish School.. 



. . . you 

UNROLL 

before their 
eager eyes 
the whole 
panorama of 
Jewish life 
and creativity 
through the ages! 



THE UNTOLD TREASURE OF JEWISH CULTURE IS YOURS AND YOUR 
CHILDREN'S— TO ENRICH YOUR LIVES— IF YOU KNOW IT AND LIVE IT! 

Start your children on th« road to a full, joyous Jewish life— and join them 
by participating actively in the work of your school and community. 

Amwican Auociation for Jewish Education 




The Jews Among the Nations 

(Continued from Page 77) 



to each other, despite the division 
in functions. The WJC's efforts are 
mainly directed to the concerns of 
our people outside Israel while the 
Zionist Organization deals mainly 
with problems connected with Is- 
rael. 

These two elements, democracy- 
in-practice and the principle of 
equality, are the basis of another 
cherished article of WJC faith — the 
principle of unity. This principle 
does not mean rigid uniformity but 
encourages a sense of responsibility 
and obligation on the part of Jews 
throughout the world for mutual aid 
and spiritual and cultural exchanges, 
thus remaining true to the immor- 
tal heritage of our people. It im- 
plies further that Jewish communi- 
ties can be welded into an organism 
while maintaining independence 
and freedom. It implies that Jewish 
life and values derive from the her- 
itage of our people. The World 



Jewish Congress Assembly reflects 
that spirit of unity which in Hebrew 
is termed Achdut af al pi ken- 
unity in spite of all obstacles. We 
fully realize that this unity cannot 
be achieved to the fullest degree. 
But a dispersed people which does 
not strive for unity despite all ob- 
stacles is doomed to vanish. And 
this is precisely what the World 
Jewish Congress is anxious to guard 
against. A study of Jewish history 
reveals that a great part of our phys- 
ical existence vanished because of 
the acceptance of the belief that 
different Jewish communities were 
not, as it were, branches of one liv- 
ing tree. The WJC is striving, with 
no small success, to combat such a 
suicidal philosophy. We know that 
this struggle for unity is endless and 
unremitting, and while we realize 
that it can never be fully achieved, 
this very striing is expressive of the 
miraculous persistence and strength 
of our people. 



! Wendell B. Powell Studio: 

: 3201 GROVE AVENUE — RICHMOND, VA. 




'em 



1953 




New Year Greetings 

EANES & CO. 

Plumbing - Heating 

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FAIR CHARGES 

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Night Calls: 2-7538 

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RICHMOND, VA. 



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Plumbing and 
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• RICHMOND, VA. 

• NORFOLK, VA. 

• GREENSBORO, N. C. 

• DURHAM, N. C. 



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PLUMBING & 
HEATING 

Gas Heating Specialist 
305 W. Brookland Park Blvd. 
7-5485— DIAL— 3-1620 
RICHMOND, VA. 



"Keep Your Trees 
Healthy" 

For Complete 

TREE SERVICE 



TREE SERVICE GO. 

Broad-Grace Arcade 
RICHMOND, VA. 



80 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 





GREETINGS 

from 



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Bank & Trust Co, 



2% Interest 
On Savings 



4th and Grace Sts. 
15th and Main Sts. 
301 I W. Cary St. 
RICHMOND, VA. 



Dial 



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RICHMOND, VA. 



Members Coa 

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1953 




5714 





Along with unity, the Third As- 
sembly seeks to attain another goal, 
bringing cohesion to our forces 
struggling against enemies, who, 
still after the greatest catastrophe in 
our history, are bent on destroying 
us. The Third Assembly of the 
WJC will not prove then merely 
another conference of formal agen- 
das and resolutions. It seeks both 
the inner and outer consolidation of 
our forces. It seeks to overcome in- 
ertia, opportunism and the line of 
least resistance, to buttress our will 
to creative life in the face of all ca- 
tastrophes. The Third Assembly of 
the WJC will seek to marshall all 
our strength to meet any challenge 
to our continued survival and secu- 
rity. 

If this inner strength will be 
achieved, the relations between the 
Jewish and non-Jewish worlds will 
undergo substantial improvement. 
To find the means to achieve such 
improvement is another goal for the 
Third Assembly of the WJC. This 
can only be achieved by a steady 
and gradual process of general im- 
provement in human relations and 
in the laying of proper foundations 
for international contacts between 
countries, governments and people. 
It is again one of the fundamental 
tasks of the WJC to seek ways to 
promote and ensure, wherever pos- 
sible, more dignified conditions of 
life for Jewish communities of dif- 
ferent nations. The obstacles to this 
goal are formidable. Over centuries, 
there has piled up biases and preju- 
dices which cannot be eliminated by 
logic or reason but only by a con- 
tinuous psychological and moral 
campaigns. Our own inner strength 
which I mentioned above is an in- 
dispensable pre-condition for such 
improvement Weak peoples can at 
best expect pity and charity but 
never political or social respect in 
this world. Our assimilationists have 
not understood that docile submis- 
siveness and the aping of the mores 
and attitudes of the majority merely 
invite contempt. Hence the impor- 
tance of the State of Israel on our 
individual and collective positions. 
Israel not only re-establishes a free 
and unhampered opportunity for re- 
newed creativeness but also imbues 
us with strength and pride since its 
equality with other organized na- 
tions resumes the thread of Jewish 
nationhood and independence. Tons 
of good-will literature, exposes of 
anti-Semites, have not restored one- 
hundredth part of respect for the 
Jewish people as the restoration of 
the State of Israel. 

In surveying the events and prob- 
lems confronting us, I am convinced 



that the forces upon which we can 
rely are stronger today than in the 
past. I do not think that I am ex- 
aggerating when I attribute this re- 
sult, in no small degree, to the dig- 
nified, straightforward and under- 
standing approach of the WJC. 
Thus the WJC informed the gov- 
ernments of 44 nations of the con- 
vening of the Third Assembly and 
invited these governments to send 
their representatives or observers to 
the sessions of its Third Plenary As- 
sembly. 

There is every reason to believe 
the Third Assembly of the World 
Jewish Congress will measure up to 
the major tasks and concerns which 
confront it and will go down in Jew- 
ish history as a significant and cre- 
ative eent. It will strengthen the 
morale of our people and substan- 
tially improve our relations with 
those people of the world who fer- 
vently desire to maintain a demo- 
cratic life founded on equality of 
rights and respect for individual dig- 
nity and freedom. 




Dr. Benjamin Akzin, Dean of the Law 
School and Professor of Constitutional 
Law at the Hebrew University of 
Jerusalem, was Visiting Professor of Po- 
litical Science at the University of 
Michigan for the summer semester. 




SUNLIGHT 

Laundry & Dry Cleaners 

For Service Dial 3-0285 
Richmond's Most Modern 
Soft Water Laundry 

Plant: 806 Brook Road 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



81 



ISRAEL SPONSORS CONQUEST 
OF THE DESERT 



For the first time since its estab- 
lishment as a State, Israel will act 
as host to industrial, cultural and 
scientific organizations in an inter- 
national exhibition and fair devoted 
to the problem of reclaiming the 
desert for intensified development. 
The "Conquest of the Desert" In- 
ternational Exhibition and Fair will 
open in Jerusalem on September 
22nd and will continue through 
October 14th. Agencies of the Unit- 
ed Nations, foreign governments 
and more than 300 private firms and 
organizations throughout the world 
will participate in the Exhibition 
which is under the sponsorship of 
the Israel Government and is rec- 
ognized by the Bureaux Interna- 
tional Des Expositions in Paris. 

The Exhibition will be held at the 
Convention Center now nearing 
completion in the suburbs of Jeru- 
salem covering an area of 80,000 
square meters. The Israel Govern- 
ment will have a separate pavillion 
displaying Israel's manufactured 
products and new industries. Visi- 
tors to this pavillion will be able 
to see the great industrial expansion 
which has taken place since the 
establishment of the State five years 
ago. In addition, there will be ex- 
hibits of agencies, development in- 
stitutions, medical organizations and 
scientific and cultural institutions 
from foreign countries and from 
Israel. The exhibits of the United 
Nations Agencies together with 
those of foreign governments will be 
housed in a spacious hall on the 
ground floor of the main building. 

With its theme of "Conquest of 
the Desert" the main sections of the 
Exhibition will deal with agriculture 
and agricultural equipment, trans- 



TARRANT 

Prescription 

DRUGGISTS 

Foushee and Broad 
MOTORCYCLE 
DELIVERY 

Dial 3-3469— Richmond, Va. 



New Year Greetings 

E. R. ESTES 

• Realtor 

# Insurance 



601 E. Franklin St. 
RICHMOND, VA. 



port equipment, building equip- 
ment, communication services and 
indstrial machinery used in desert 
reclamation. 

SEPTEMBER IN ISRAEL 

It is anticipated that more than 
10,000 foreign visitors and approxi- 
mately a million visitors from Israel 
itself will attend the Exhibition. 
During the Exhibition a conference 
of Jewish agronimists will be held. 
In the Concert Hall of the Con- 
vention Center, which has a seating 
capacity of 3,500, artistic and the- 
atrical performances will be held 
each evening throughout the Exhi- 
bition. 

In connection with the Exhibi- 
tion and Trade Fair, a fashion show 
will be held under the supervision 
of the Israel Fashion Center and 
the Manufacturers Association of 
Israel. The latest Israel styles, as 
seen recently in the United States 
at a show held for buyers of major 
houses in the country, will be on dis- 
play. The use of new fabrics and 
local design will be featured in this 
fashion show. 

The "Conquest of the Desert" 
Exhibition is one of several major 
events taking place in Israel during 
the month of September which are 
expected to attract a great influx of 
tourists to the country. On Septem- 
ber 20th, the Fourth World Mac- 
cabia will be held, running through 
September 29th, with Jewish ath- 
letes from all parts of the world 
participating in this major sports 
event. The Israel National Tourist 
Office has worked out extensive 
plans to allow tourists to participate 
in these two events as well as to tour 
the country and visit ancient sites 
such as those in Jerusalem, Naza- 
reth, Tiberias and Caesarea as well 
as the modern agricultural and in- 
dustrial development as symbolic of 
Israel's growth in the past five years. 

Seven new luxurious hotels com- 
bining modern facilities with loca- 
tion of great beauty along Israel's 
beaches and in Jerusalem have re- 
cently been completed. A new rate 
of exchange, especially for tourists, 
of IL.1.800 to $1.00, makes Israel 
one of the least expensive coun- 
tries to visit. Many other privi- 
leges have also been announced 
for tourists, such as freedom from 
food-rationing restrictions, easing of 
frontier and customs formalities, 
and priority in hotel accommoda- 
tions and transportation. 



EMPORIA, YA. 





Greetings and Best Wishes 
1953 # 5714 



Emporia Sash & Door Co, 

EMPORIA • VIRGINIA 

Lumber, Crates and Box Shooks 
FLOORING CEILING SIDING 

PLASTER CEMENT LIME 

R. W. JORDAN, President & Treas. 
J. P. JORDAN, Vice-President 



THE CITIZENS 
NATIONAL BANK 

EMPORIA, VA. 

MAXIMUM SAFETY 
• EFFICIENT SERVICE 

A Member of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 



HARRIS HARDWARE CO. 

• "Farm and Garden Seeds Our Specialty" 

• Sash, Doors, Glass, Paints, Oils, Varnish 

EMPORIA, VA. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

EMPORIA • VIRGINIA 

• SAFE # SOUND # SECURE 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 



"The Home of Better Values" 

LEGGETT'S = 

DEPT. STORE = 

EMPORIA, VA. 



82 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



ROANOKE, VA. 



We publish two good newspapers. 
Virtually everybody in and around 
Roanoke reads one of them. 

We sell advertising space reasonably. 
It produces sales. 



THE ROANOKE TIMES 



HAPPY NEW YEAR . . . from 




III W. Campbell Ave. 



ROANOKE, VA. 




This is the latest addition 
to our fleet of white ambulances. 

Like all of our ambulances, 
it has the latest in oxygen ther- 
apy equipment, available for im- 
mediate service to our patrons. 

It is manned by experienced 
men with competent training in 
first aid . . . men who know what 
not to do as well as what to do. 



Ambulance Service 
Phone 6283 




ROANOKE, VA. 




Sign of Quality 
Dairy Products 
and 
Ice Cream 

CLOVER 

CREAMERY 
CO., Inc. 

Roanoke and Salem, Va. 

Dial 3-3603 




5714- WHO SHALL LIVE... WHO SHALL DIE? 



Report Progress on 
Project for Circuit 
Riding Rabbi 

I. D. Blumenthal, president of 
the North Carolina Association of 
Jewish Men, made a report of prog- 
ress in connection with the project 
upon which the group is working, 
at the B'nai B'rith Institute of Juda- 
ism held at Wildacres, Little Switz- 
erland June 12th-16th. 

Mr. Blumenthal stated that cir- 
culars outlining the project for a 
travelling educator to serve the 
smaller sections of the State that 
are remote from Synagogues, had 
been mailed. The present plan calls 
for a fund raising campaign that 
will meet the approximate first year's 
budget of $25,000. Following years 
are figured to require but $15,000 
annually. It is intended to call upon 
the synagogues of the State to make 
a contribution as a token of their 
support, of one dollar per member, 
and it is also planned to call upon 
the community charity federations 
for their support. 



In ancient days Yom Kippur was 
a holiday of rejoicing as well as 
fasting. The Talmud relates that on 
that day it was customary for the 
youth to make merry and to con- 
gregate in vineyards for meeting des- 
tined mates. Remnants of that cus- 
tom are still retained by Caucasian 
Jews whose daughters and sons 
gather in the streets and dance to 
the tune of fifes and other native in- 
struments played by pre-arrange- 
ment by non-Jewish musicians. In 
Tripoli it is customary for young- 
sters between the ages of nine and 
twelve to gather in the synagogue 
Yom Kippur afternoon and to dance 
to the tune of wedding songs. The 
dancing custom still exists among 
Jews in Abyssinia, but there both 
men and women participate, sepa- 
rately of course. The custom of 
youthful rejoicing and dancing on 
Yom Kippur once prevailed in some 
Jewish communities in Rumania, 
but it was abolished on rabbinic 
decree. During the Middle Ages it 
was customary for children and 
adults to play games of nuts, a de- 
vice designed no doubt to ease the 
burden of fasting. 



Your Best Clothes Deserve the Best Cleaning 




AND 

DRY CLEANING w DYEING 

502 IITHST.NLW ROANOKE. VIRGINIA 



AND • • • 

FOR THE 
BEST 

CLEANING 
DIAL 3-2465 



ART 

PRINTING CO. 



9 Printing 
• Ruling 



• Engraving 
9 Binding 



418 First St., S. W. 
ROANOKE, VA. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



53 



GREENSBORO MANUFACTURING CO. IN NEW HOME 





NEW PLANT OF THE GREENSBORO MANUFACTURING CO. 



Charleston. The bridegrooms par- 
ents are Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. 
Meyerson of Charleston. 

Mrs. Meyerson was graduated in 
June from Sophie Newcomb Col- 
lege in New Orleans. Mr. Meyer- 
son, who served in World War II, 
received his Bachelor and Master 
of Law degrees from Duke Univer- 
sity. He is associated in business 
with his father in Charleston, where 
the couple will live. 



On August 1st the Greensboro 
Manufacturing Co., among the out- 
standing manufacturers of women's 
and children's nightwear, opened its 
new plant on East Bessemer Avenue 
in what was formerly the O.R.D. 
camp site. 

Greensboro Manufacturing Com- 
pany was organized by its present 
principals, Victor Levy and Jesse M. 
Colchamiro, in 1932 at its former 
location at Walker Avenue and 
Ashe Street. They sell to jobbers, 
retailers and retail syndicates, and 
their sales office is at 13 SO Broad- 
way in New York City. 

The new plant occupies 158,000 
square feet, all on one floor. It is 
equipped with the most modern 
machinery and fixtures, and is air- 
conditioned throughout. The archi- 
tect was Edward Loewenstein As- 
sociates. The new building was 
dedicated on July 13th, when Ben 
Cone, former Greensboro mayor 
and councilman, threw the switch 
that set the plant in operation. 



MANHATTAN 

Restaurant 

• An Eating Place of 

• Unique Excellence 

109 South Jefferson 
ROANOKE, VA. 



Metropolitan 

"Roanoke's Foremost 
Eating Place" 

9 GOOD FOOD IS 
• GOOD HEALTH 

AIR CONDITIONING 
510 South Jefferson Street 
ROANOKE, VA. 



SPORTSMAN 

SODAS 
LUNCHEONETTE 
CIGARS 

Corner Jefferson and Church 
ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 



CHARLESTON, S. C. 



Miss Jane Frances Pearlstine and 
Mr. Gerald Lee Meverson were 
united in marriage in a candlelight 
ceremony performed in the Colonial 
Room of the Francis Marion Hotel 
on July 12th. 



Dr. Alan Tarshish, rabbi of Con- 
gregation K. K. Beth Elohim, offi- 
ciated. Mr. Louis R. Cauette pre- 
sented a program of wedding music. 

The bride is a daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Edwin S. Pearlstine of 



PARIS (WNS)— The Emergency 
Immigration Bill passed by Con- 
gress and signed by President Eisen- 
hower last week will enable about 
15,000 Jews to enter the United 
States within three years, it was de- 
clared here by Arthur Greenleigh, 
executive director of the United 
Service for New Americans. 



More business and industry 
comes to town 

when ever/one works together 




When a new industry conies to a com- 
munity it brings new opportunities for 
jobs. Its payroll means more business for 
local stores. Its taxes help pay for better 
roads and schools. New people move in, 
with new interests, ideas, and talents, 
bringing new vitality to every phase of 
community life. 

Forward-looking citizens plan ahead and 
work together to make their community 
attractive to desirable industries looking 
for a place to locate. 



As an active working citizen of every 
community we serve, Appalachian publi- 
cizes the industrial advantages of this 
area to plant site seekers all over 
America. We have men throughout the 
area who cooperate with the communities 
to attract desirable new industries. 

Appalachian 



84 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




llll!lllllllllllll!l!!Slilllllllllllli!lillSlii;it 



HAPPY 
NEW YEAR 



f 



rom 



The First National Exchange Bank 
of Roanoke 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
ROANOKE, VA. 



Two Convenient Offices 

Jefferson and Williamson Road 

Campbell at Pioneer 



TOLSTOI. THE ARAB KING 
AND THE ARTIST 



ilMllillllllllllllllllllligillllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIillS! 



Breakfast time is 




Rainbo Bread Co. 

Roanoke, Virginia 





GUY'S: 

FRED KUNC 

303- A FIRST ST. S. W. 
ROANOKE, VA. 



Reach for . 



^ BO***"* 



. . . and Sunbeam Cakes and Pies 
BOWMAN'S BAKERY • • ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 



Leo Tolstoi, the great Russian 
novelist and moral philosopher lived 
the life of a strict vegetarian. He 
also went about barefooted like a 
mere peasant. Yet though he al- 
ways advocated kindness and love, 
his face was extremely stern. To his 
house in Yasnaya Polyana there 
came many pilgrims from all over 
Russia as well as from other coun- 
tries — admirers and disciples who 
wanted to have a glimpse of the 
Russian prophet. 

One student from St. Petersburg, 
a follower of Tolstoi's ethico-Chris- 
tian teachings, who had visited Yas- 
naya Polyana and had had the good 
fortune to be received by his great 
teacher was, however, much disillu- 
sioned by Tolstoi's appearance. He 
could in no way reconcile this great 
man's gospel of loving-kindness as 
well as pity with his very unkindly, 
well-nigh brutal face. And the poor 
student was consumed with anguish. 
One day, however, his face lit up 
with joy. He had made a great dis- 
covery and hastened to communi- 
cate it to Tolstoi — a story told in 
an ancient Hebrew book: 

An Arab king who had learned of 
the great Jewish leader, Moses, as 
well as of his wisdom, kindness and 
saintliness decided to procure a por- 
trait of Moses and to hang it up in 
his palace. He therefore ordered his 
best painter to go to the desert to 
find Moses and make a portrait of 
him. When this painter returned 
from the desert with a portrait of 
Moses, the king placed the likeness 
of the Jewish leader in the most 
magnificent part of his palace. He 
then convened his counsellors and 
the wisest men in the land and, 
without telling them who was the 
subject of the portrait he showed 
them, asked them what they 
thought of the face in the picture. 
"A wicked man," said one of them. 
"A murdered," said another. "An 
adulterer," said a third — with a 
mien of disgust. 

Each of the men in the royal as- 
sembly found in the portrayed face 
evil, malice, and vileness. The King 
was horrified: In great anger he ex- 
claimed: "Do you know this is? 
This is Moses, God's own emissary, 
the great Jewish leader, the man 
who teaches love, justice and right- 
eousness! And to think that I have 
trusted you for so many years, be- 
lieved in your knowledge and wis- 
dom." 

And the king in his indignation 
ordered that all his counsellors and 
the wise men present be beheaded. 



These bowed their heads and lis- 
tened to the king's decree without 
so much as daring to murmur a 
single word of protest. One of them, 
however, a very aged man whose 
days seemed numbered in any event, 
came forward and kneeling before 
the monarch, spoke forth. 

"My Lord and Master!" said he. 
"Thou art just and thy judgment is 
just. But . . . perhaps it is the fault 
of the painter? Mayhap he has not 
truly taken down Moses' features 
and that was why we arrived at a 
wrong conclusion." 

The King, realizing that there 
was wisdom in the words of his aged 
counsellor, resolved that all his 
counsellors and wise men, headed 
by himself, as well as the painter, 
depart for the desert in search of 
Moses. After many months of wan- 
dering, they came upon Moses seat- 
ed in his tent, and forthwith per- 
ceived that his face was not unlike 
the one they had seen in the por. 
trait. The King bowed to Moses 
and apprised him of the aim of their 
voyage. And Moses said to him: 

"Great is the wisdom of your 
counsellors and courtiers! They 
have truly judged my face. I was in- 
deed born with all the instincts of a 
wicked, vile, brutal and cunning 
man. The traits of all vice are en- 
graved on my visage. But I have la- 
bored hard to bring about a trans- 
formation. I have conquered the 
evil in me. I have succeeded in un- 
doing the wickedness, brutality and 
vileness that were mine and kind- 
ness, love and truthfulness have 
(Please Turn to Page 106) 




The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



B5 



THE TWICE PERSECUTED 

By RICHARD COHEN 

Richard Cohen is the European Press Officer of the Joint Distribution 
Committee, one of the three constituent agencies of the United Jewish Appeal. 
He wrote the article that follows last month in West Berlin soon after the 
"Joint" established its first refugee aid station for escapees from Communist 
bondage. Here is his dramatic and authoritative eye-witness report on Jews 
who suffered first under Hitler, and then under the Soviet pharoahs — a report 
on the "twice-persecuted."— THE EDITOR. 



BERLIN (Special to the United 
Jewish Appeal — One evening in 
January Joseph Greenberg (not his 
real name) turned out the light in 
his apartment in East Berlin, held 
his wife's hand as they went down 
three flights of stairs with their son 
Daniel, aged four, and walked to 
the subway. Forty minutes later the 
train crossed into West Berlin. Jo- 
seph, his wife and little Daniel got 
off at Kurfurstendamm. They 
walked a few blocks to the Jewish 
community building, registered 
there and were assigned beds in the 
hostel downstairs. Inside the shel- 
ter there were beds and cots, and 
most of them were occupied. In the 
corner, a sleeping child was crying 
in a dream. An old man was sitting 
on his cot drinking a cup of coffee. 
On the wall was a calendar. As Jo- 
seph opened his suitcase to unpack 
and begin life as a refugee once 
again, he looked up and noted the 
date. It was twenty years since Adolf 
Hitler's ascent to power in Ger 
many. 

Since the beginning of 1953, five 
hundred Jewish men, women and 
children have made the same flight 
to freedom that Joseph Greenberg 
took. From Leipzig, Dresden and 
every major city in the Russian zone 
of Germany, and from the Soviet 
sector of Berlin itself, the refugees 
come. Most of them are weary, 
broken men and women. Their av- 




James C. McDonald, Chairman of the 
Advisory Council of the $500,000,000 
State of Israel Bond Drive, and former 
United States Ambassador to the State 
of Israel, has been in Israel studying 
the uses to which the Bond money are 
being put. 



erage age is nearly 60. Few reach 
the safety of West Berlin with more 
than a few nearly worthless East 
Zone marks in their pockets. 

Thev call themselves the "twice- 
persecuted," for these are the Jews 
who lived through the Nazi era only 
to face new terror in a Germany 
where their old nightmare has 
turned Red. 

Joseph Grecnberg's story is a fa- 
miliar one in the refugee shelter on 
bomb-wrecked Joachimstaler Strasse, 
one of four hostels thus far estab- 
lished by the Berlin Jewish commu- 
nity with funds provided bv the 
Joint Distribution Committee and 
raised through the United Jewish 
Appeal. It is a story of mounting 
pressure against Jews, of interroga- 
tions, investigations and increasing 
anti-Semitic hostility to the point 
where Jewish men and women who 
have been through it all once before 
are impelled again to flee because 
again their lives are in danger. 

The first indication that Jews liv- 
ing in Soviet-occupied Germany 
were to be the speical targets of 
Communism came shortly after the 
Slansky trial in Prague, in Decem- 
ber, when phrases like "Jewish bour- 
geois nationalism" and "homeless 
cosmopolitans" began to appear 
more and more in the Communist 
press. Then Moscow announced 
discovery of a murder plot against 
top Soviet leaders by nine Russian 





WROV 
WROV-TV 

Channel 27— ABC 
ROANOKE, VA. 



44)1 




FROM 



MUNDY 

MOTOR LINES 

GENERAL OFFICE: ROANOKE, VA. 

Regular Daily Schedule Befween 

NEW YORK : : PHILADELPHIA : : BALTIMORE 

and 

LYNCHBURG : : STAUNTON : : ROANOKE 
BRISTOL : : HIGH POINT 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



B^P^^PgjBBB^^^^^^^ BLUE STREET 



86 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




Are You Using 
These Services? 

• Checking Accounts 

• Savings Accounts 

• Banking by Mail 

• Trust Service 

• Automobile Loans 

• Travelers Cheques 

• Commercial Loans 

• Real Estate Loans 

• Personal Loans 



Colonial- American | 

National Bank of Roanoke | 

Member Federal Reserve Sysfem and Federal ^ 

Deposit Insurance Corporation ~ 

Main Office: Jefferson at Campbell E 

Williamson Road Branch: Williamson Road at Burton s 

. ,| 



from the Staff 





■i 



WSLS-TV CHANNEL 10 

For ROANOKE and WESTERN VIRGINIA 

TOPS IN RADIO 

WSLS 610 on your dial 



Greetings = 




1953 • 5714 I 



I General Motor Lines | 

| Satisfactory = 

1 MOTOR FREIGHT 1 

| SERVICE 1 

= 526 Orange Avenue, N. E. E 

1 ROANOKE, VA. | 

| • ROANOKE, VA. • GALAX, VA. • STUART, VA. § 

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E • MARTINSVILLE, VA. • INDEPENDENCE, VA. | 



physicians — six of them Jews, and 
all of them, allegedly, in the secret 
pay of "Joint" — the Joint Distribu- 
tion Committee, largest Jewish wel- 
fare agency operating in Europe and 
a constituent agency of the UJA. 
Shortly thereafter the president of 
the Jewish community of Hungary 
was arrested in Budapest. 

While these developments were 
taking place elsewhere in the Com- 
munist world, pressure mounted on 
the Jews of East Germany and East 
Berlin. Aged and invalid Jews who 
had merited a small pension for the 
suffering they endured at Nazi 
hands were suddenly removed from 
the pension lists. Leaders of East 
German Jewish communities were 
questioned at great length on their 
connections with JDC. Finallv it 
was Joseph's turn. 

One afternoon he was called 
down to East Berlin headquarters 
of the Communist-controlled Asso- 
ciation for Victims of Nazi Persecu- 
tion (VVN), which he — along with 
almost all other Jews living in So- 
viet-occupied territory — had joined 
immediately after V-E Day. For 
ninety minutes VVN officials ques- 
tioned him. Why, they wanted to 
know, had he never taken an active 
part in the activities of the VVN? 
What was the reason for his never 
having joined the Socialist Unity 
(Communist) party or the German- 
Soviet Friendship League? Was it 
true that he had not yet volunteered 
for the Socialist labor battalions 
clearing away the rubble on the 
streets? And what services did he 
perform to merit receiving monthly 
food parcels from the "Joint," which 
he surely must know to be an espi- 
onage and sabotage agency? The 
Communist interrogator smiled a 



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grim smile when the interview 
ended. You'll be hearing from us 
again soon," he said. "Meanwhile, 
you better behave yourself." 

The last time Joseph Greenberg 
underwent questioning like that 
was in November, 1938 — only then 
his questioners were Nazis. Two 
days later he and his family had 
been arrested and sent to Dachau. 
Only he had survived. 

Joseph walked home slowly after 
the interrogation, a nameless dread 
in his throat. That night he and 
his wife ate a silent supper in their 
East Berlin apartment. Then, the 
dishes done, they sat down on their 
new sofa to talk. 

Their decision was arrived at 
quickly. An hour later — carrying 
only a small valise — Joseph Green- 
berg and his family entered the sub- 
way and boarded their freedom train 
to West Berlin. 

* * * 

The enormity of Joseph Green- 
berg's decision — his unwillingness to 
leave behind him the fragments of 
a broken life which has was just be- 
ginning to put together, his des- 
perate effort to take his family and 
start all over again — is a reflection 
of the terrible fear East Germany'^ 
surviving Jews know. An estimated 
2,500 Jewish survivors still live 
under Soviet domination in Ger- 
many. Yet every day the number 
dwindles as more Jews slip through 
the Iron Curtain into West Berlin. 

They come at the rate of a dozen 
a day, the "twice-persecuted." And 
as they come in, the Jews of the 
United States — horrified at the 
spectre of anti-Semitism rising again 
in Germany (but wearing Red in- 
stead of Brown) — cannot act quickly 
enough in support of the United 



If you say . . . 

HAPPY NEW YEAR 

. Say it 
with 
flowers 
from 



'I 




The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



87 



Jewish Appeal. At this crucial mo- 
ment, UJA means hope and life for 
those fleeing threat and tyranny. 

JDC — the same Joint Distribu- 
tion Committee accused by Soviet 
Russia of being an American espion- 
age and sabotage agency — has made 
emergency cash grants to feed, 
clothe and provide shelter for the 
refugees. Operating through the 
Jewish community of Berlin, JDC 
has inaugurated a whole relief pro- 
gram in behalf of families like the 
Joseph Greenbergs, men, women 
and children who successfully took 
the subway to a new life with no 
other resources than the clothes on 
their backs. 

To those who obtain visas for re- 
settlement in other Western coun- 
tries, JDC provides financial aid to 
pay for and other transportation 
costs. United Jewish Appeal funds, 
which support JDC's activities, also 
meet the costs of the Jewish Agency 
in transporting to Israel those So- 
viet zone refugees who seek a haven 
there. 

Legal protection and other bene- 
fits are provided by West Berlin and 
the German Federal Republic to 
refugees who pass a screening proc- 
ess. All Jews are automatically ap- 
proved for such benefits, which in- 
clude transportation by air to West- 
ern Germany. 

In Berlin itself, already over- 
crowded with refugees, there is no 
future for the homeless. Since 1949 
well over 100,000 men, women and 
children of all faiths have fled here 
from the East. The very day Joseph 
and his family slipped through the 
Iron Curtain, the West Berlin gov- 
ernment opened its seventy-fifth ref- 
ugee camp, with a total population 
running into the tens of thousands. 



What can the world do for these 
homeless ones? One way out is emi- 
gration — but the U. S., Canada, 
Australia and other countries have 
sharplv reduced immigration to 
their shores within recent months 
and prospects for an early about- 
face do not seem bright. For the 
Jewish refugees, Israel offers safety 
and a warm welcome — but a quar- 
ter of a million immigrants now in 
Israel still live in tents and flimsy 
huts, and many of the East Berlin 
refugees have seen enough of camps 
to last them more than a lifetime. 

Families like Joseph Greenberg's 
can make good in their new homes, 
whether they emigrate abroad or 
stay in West Germany, if only they 
are given the chance. But not many 
of the hundreds of refugees who 
have already crossed the border into 
freedom have the youth and the 
confidence in themselves that Jo- 
seph and his wife have. 

More typical of the refugees is 




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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



LYNCHBURG, VA. 



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Sarah Heymann, 62, a widow. Mrs. 
Heymann fled East Germany an 
hour after her building superintend- 
ent called after her, "What are you 
still doing here, you American Jew?" 
Instead of keeping her appointment 
for questioning at East Berlin po- 
lice headquarters that afternoon, 
she boarded the subway to the 
West. Now she lives in a refugee 
shelter on the shores of Lake Wann- 
see, a suburb of Berlin. In the sum- 
mer time the house and the grounds 
around it serve as a vacation camp 
for boys and girls, sponsored by the 
Berlin Jewish community. To meet 
the mounting needs involved in car- 
ing for 100 new refugees a week, 
the community — working with UJA 
funds channeled to the JDC — took 
over the house again last month and 
turned it into a hostel. 

Another shelter has been made 
out of several wards of the Jewish 
community hospital of Berlin. 
Among the refugees living there are 
sixteen Jewish orphans, wards of the 
Berlin Jewish community. The in- 
stitution they once called home is 
in the Soviet sector of Berlin. In 
mid-January, shortly after the first 
Jews began to flee the Russian zone 
of Germany, the children were 
smuggled out into the safety of 
West Berlin. Also brought out to 
the West from an institution in 
Berlin's Soviet sector were twenty- 
five residents of the Jewish com- 



munity's home for the aged. Today 
they live in another old age home, 
in the Western sector of the city. 

Scores of other refugee families 
arriving homeless and penniless in 
West Berlin have been put up in 
furnished rooms, their rent paid for 
by American Jews through UJA. 
Among them are Heinrich Schultz 
and his wife, Use. They have no 
children any more — Philip, their 
son, a handsome, black-haired lad, 
was taken from them during the 
early days of Nazi rule over Ger- 
many. In 1938, less than a year be- 
fore the outbreak of World War II, 
Mr. and Mrs. Schultz fled Germany 
and wound up in Shanghai, China, 
at that time the only city in the 
world that required no visa or pass- 
port. For seven long years the 
Schultzes lived in Shanghai. Most 
of the time they lived behind 
barbed-wire in a ghetto set up by 
Japanese troops occupying the city. 
When V-J Day came the Schultzes 
and 15,000 other European Jewish 
refugees were freed. Heinrich and 
Use, too tired to begin life all over 
again, chose to be repatriated to 
their native Berlin, where they 
could sit in the park Philip used to 
play in and live with memories that 
were warm and bright. Exactly 
seven years after they returned to 
Germany from China, Heinrich and 
Use crossed over into West Berlin 
as refugees again. 




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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



89 



COLLEGE PATH LEADS TO REVERSION 

By RABBI ABRAHAM HEFTERMAN 



A man in the late sixties, a stran- 
ger to the town, entered the rabbi's 
studio. He was obviously disturbed, 
and it was apparent from his im- 
patience and nervous movements 
that he was grappling with a grave 
problem. The rabbi had just left 
his office, but when the rebbitzin 
discerned the man's restlessness she 
assured him her husband would 
soon return while simultaneously 
engaging him in friendly conversa- 
tion. The visitor, however, main- 
tained an icy silence, until the soft- 
spoken woman mentioned that the 
rabbi was in the synagogue rehears- 
ing a wedding ceremony. At her 
mention of the world "wedding," 
the visitor broke his strange silence. 

"Is the wedding to take place to- 
night yet?" he asked with obvious 
curiosity. The rebbitzin nodded af- 
firmatively and prepared to make 
her exit from the studio. But the 
visitor seemed perturbed by the curt 
reply. "Do you think the rabbi will 
have time to perform another wed- 
ding ceremony tonight?" he asked 
stammeringly, as if under the bur- 
den of a painful thought. 
The rabbi returned pale and ex- 





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hausted from the chore. The re- 
hearsal had been to his distaste. But 
when he observed the strange man 
in his office, a tender smile lit up 
his face and, as if to shake off the 
child-play in which he had just par- 
ticipated, the rabbi extended a 
hearty "sholem aleichem" to the 
visitor and asked: "Have you been 
waiting long? A young couple out- 
side requested me to tell you to 
shorten this visit since they were 
in a hurry for an appointment with 
the judge. I invited them to my 
studio, but they preferred to remain 
outside. Can you tell me, please, 
whence a Jew comes and how I can 
be of service to you?" Without los- 
ing time, the Jew replied: "I hail 
from an adjacent town and I came 
to you for religious advice. If you 
rule it permissible, I shal lask you 
to wed them tonight yet. Not hav- 
ing secured a local marriage license, 
the judge promised them a waiver 
of the interim waiting period if they 
came to him on time." 

The question was rather weird. 
What the man reallv wanted to 
know was whether the rabbi would 
have no objection to performing 
the nuptials in view of the fact 
that the groom was a Catholic. Be- 
fore the rabbi could make negative 
reply to the query, the visitor has- 
tened to remind him that the young 
man was of Jewish descent, that he 
had been brought into the fold in 
Abrahamic rites but that capricious 
and unusual circumstances had 
driven him to a strange faith. 

Understandablv enough, the 
rabbi was now anxious for more de- 
tails and the visitor, completely 
oblivious to the waiting couple, 
slowly began unraveling the full 




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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




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story to the puzzled rabbi. He was 
the grandfather of the "Catholic" 
youth and, over the past fifteen 
years, he had been a vital contribu- 
tor to the groom's Catholic educa- 
tion and upbringing. He didn't 
know whether the Almightv would 
punish him for that transgression, 
but onlv the Lord knew he had no 
other alternative. Blood is not 
water and, besides, he never did lay 
claim to extreme piety and saintli- 
ness. He was just an ordinary Jew, 
lacking an inner strength to with- 
stand great tests. 

His tribulations began on the 
day when his "ben yahid", only 
son, was graduated from college. He 
and his wife traveled to the son's 
graduation exercises at the State 
College in high hope, looking for- 
ward to the "naches" they were 
about to have from their brilliant 
ben yahid They struggled and suf- 
fered before they pulled the youth 
through college, and now they 
were in sight of the great reward. 

They were waiting with trem- 
bling hearts for the moment when 
the graduation ceremonies would 
be over and their "kaddish" would 
fall into their embracing hands. But 
their joy melted, giving way instead 
to pain and agony, when the first 
to fall into embrace with their son 
was a non-Jewish girl, of the same 
college, who reluctantly yielded for 
a few tepid words with his parents. 

From that day on their tzores did 
not cease for one minute. The 
Christian girl became their son's 
bride, later their daughter-in-law 
and, before the year was over, there 
came a male child .The young 
mother, a devout Catholic, worked 
feverishly to have the child bap- 
tized at once. She just wouldn't 
have an impure creature in her 
home. "Needless to relate, she won 
having the child circumcized. We 
fully realized that our efforts were 
in vain, that the child would be 
raised a Gentile and grow up per- 
haps as hostile to Jews as his 
mother, but we were happy even in 
that bit of self-deception. Our de- 
termination to have the child cir- 
cumsized may well have stemmed 
from a motive of revenge. Let her 
at least know that her child is a 
Jewish govele. Seven years passed 
by. Many were the times when we 
sought to make peace with the 
tragic thought that our ben yahid 
was dead and that all was left of 
him was the sad remembrance. But 
as often as we indulged in this hor- 
rible fancy, he would come to life 
in our hearts. As time passed, he 
became more estranged from us, 
leaving us with nothing more than 



pain and agony and aggravation. 
We were sure that not even the 
devil himself could have concocted 
such misfortune as befell us, until 
the horrible Cocoanut Grove fire 
in Boston where some eight hun- 
dred people perished in flame, 
among them my son, his wife and 
her parents. They had gone there 
to celebrate their eighth wedding 
anniversary." 

While they were sitting shivah 
the disconsolate grandparents con- 
templated the future of the child 
whom fate now seemed to throw 
into their arms. When the mourn- 
ing period was over, they were at 
once off to secure custody of the 
orphan. But there was the Catholic 
church to reckon with. The priest 
was friendly but firm. With evident 
pride he told them the Catholic 
church had never yet lost an or- 
phaned child and he had no inten- 
tion of giving them unconditional 
custody of the child. He was will- 
ing to give them custody under the 
unusual circumstances of the case, 
but only on the unalterable condi- 
tion that they stipulate to raise the 
child in the Christian faith and 
Catholic tradition. In that event, 
he would fully cooperate in secur- 
ing the necessary legal documents. 

"Now rabbi," the pain wracked 
man went on, "tell me what was I 
to do? Leave my flesh and blood in 
such hands? No. Without hesita- 
tion, I consented to give all assur- 
ances that I would not rob the 
Christian faith of my grandchild. 
Let him grow up as they demand, 
but it will at least be I who will 
watch him grow. He is mine, and 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



91 



he is so innocent. And I kept the 
promise sacredly. Our shocked Jew- 
ish neighbors kept aloof from us in 
resentment against a Jew's taking 
his own grandchild to masses and 
Christian devotionals. But my wife 
and I did all in our power to seed 
in the child a love for his faith. I 
do not know whether it was an evil 
genius in us or a decree from above. 
There was the hurt, but also the re- 
ward. The child loved us more than 
the church." 

"Three vears ago, he entered a 
college some hundred miles from 
our town. The priest immediately 
registered him as a church member. 
He attended church services with 
great regularity, but he always grav- 
itated toward Jewish camaraderie. 
He would frequently drop in to 
Hillel gatherings and relish Jewish 
food there. This the priest sensed 
and diplomatically cautioned him 
to keep aloof from Jews. I have no 
way of knowing to what extent he 
was influenced by the priest, but I 
do know that some months ago he 
came to us for his Christmas vaca- 
tion with a Jewish young lady. 
When he introduced her as his 
bride, his grandmother fainted." 
The now-smiling Jew told the rabbi 
that there was perhaps yet sufficient 
time for the waiting couple to get 
the judge's waiver. Softly he whis- 
pered: "The document lists him as 
a Catholic but, rabbi — and no one 
of such a child is determined by 
is listening— he is a good Jewish 
child, such a year on me." 

But the rabbi's ruling was a dis- 
appointing one both to the happy 
grandfather and the young couple 



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that was anxiously counting the 
minutes. The young man was of a 
Christian mother, and since under 
Jewish law the religious attachment 
his maternal origin it was essential 
that the young man be converted 
before he could be Jewishly mar- 
ried, the rabbi declared while simul- 
taneosly offering sincere personal 
cooperation in accelerating the 
"conversion" process. 

When the couple was leaving the 
canopy some weeks later, bound in 
marriage by the laws of Israel and 
Moses, the grandfather was heard 
whispering to his happy wife: 
"Quite remarkable. Because of a 
collge our own child was torn away 
from us and because of a college 
our child's child has been restored 
to us. Who says there are no mir- 
acles these days?" 

ATTENTION — WOMEN'S 
ORGANIZATIONS! 

Obtaining subscriptions or renew- 
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Outlook is an ideal way of raising 
money for your projects or general 
fund. Write for full particulars. 




Rabbi Sidney E. Unger will be the guest 
at a celebration in his honor on the oc- 
casion of his 25th year in the rabbinate. 
His host will be the members of his 
congregation, Beth Ha-Tephila, of Ashe- 
ville, N. C. Dr. Julian Morgenstern, 
President Emeritus of the Hebrew 
Union College, will be here as principal 
speaker on Friday evening, and Mr. 
Phil Meyers, Vice-President of the 
U. A. H. C., will be here to represent 
the Union. A committee, headed by 
Dr. Leon H. Feldman, is now busily 
at work preparing details. 
Dr. Unger was born New York City and 
educated in the elementary and high 
schools of that city. He attended Col- 
lege of the City of New York two years, 
University of Cincinnati four years, re- 
ceiving Degree of B.A., 1925. Did grad- 
uate work at University of Pennsylvania, 
Philadelphia, Pa., in the Department of 
Education and Sociology; University of 
Mexico, Mexico City, D. F. (three 
summer sessions).; Temple University, 
Philadelphia, Pa., receiving the Degree 
of Ed. M. and S.T.D. (Doctor of Sacred 
Theology).; attended and was ordained 
Rabbi, Hebrew Union College, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, 1928. 



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92 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



NORFOLK, VA. 



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NEW YEAR m • • 
GREETINGS . . . from 



EDWARDS COUNCILOR CO. 

Janitors' Supplies 

121 Colley Avenue NORFOLK, VA. 





REAL ESTATE 



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SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 



300 YEARS OF NEW YORK JEWRY 

By P. NIBUR 



The City of New York, largest 
city in the world, with a population 
of more than 8 million, is this 
year celebrating its three -hundredth 
birthday. The small town under 
Dutch rule, which was then called 
New Amsterdam, (it acquired the 
name of New York eleven years 
later when the British occupied the 
town) exactly three hundred years 
ago received the right of local self- 
government. 

A year later, in 1654, there ar- 
rived in New Amsterdam the first 
shipload of Jews, 23 in number, the 
first Jews to land on the soil of what 
is now the United States of Amer- 
ica. They came to these shores from 
Brazil, fleeing from the Portuguese 
who had seized this colony from the 
Dutch and begun to install the in- 
quisition there. A month earlier this 
group had been preceded in New 
Amsterdam by the arrival there of 
Jacob Bar-Simeon, who had come 
directly from Holland and who was 
the first Jew to land in North Amer- 



— — ica. 



Next year, 1954, New York Jewry- 
will together with the Jewries of 
many other American communities 
celebrate the the 300th anniversary 
of Jewish settlement, of Jewish life, 
in the United States. It will be a 
great celebration which will find its 
echo in all countries of the world 
where there are large or small Jew- 
ish communities. The United States 
with its five-and-a-half million Jews 
contains nearly half the Jewish pop- 
ulation of the world and New York 
City with its two-and-a-half million 
Jews contains nearly half the Jewish 
population of the United States. 
Never before in Jewish historv have 
so many Jews congregated in one 
community. New York City is by 
far the largest Jewish city in the 
world. The entire State of Israel, 
k:\en today after the tremendous 
number of immigrants who have 
been coming to its shores during the 
past five years, still contains a 
smaller number of Jews than the 
one city of New York. New York 
City has as many, or perhaps even 
more, Jews than are to be found in 
all of Soviet Russia. 

No city in the world has grown 
so fast during the past three hun- 
dred years as has New York. And 
if the city as a whole made giant 
strides, its Jewish population, partic- 
ularly during the last seventy years 
when the great East European im- 
migration to the United States 
began, grew even faster. The rapid 



growth of the city generally gave 
New York Jews an opportunity to 
develop and make economic prog- 
ress and instilled in them a desire 
to remain in this port city where 
they had landed from Europe, in- 
stead of settling further inland. 

However, New York's giant 
growth also served to uproot from 
the city, to a large extent, its Amer- 
ican religious-Anglo-Saxon cultural 
tradition and to create the atmo- 
sphere of a place to wealth-and- 
pleasure seekers. In such an atmos- 
phere it was difficult for the Jewish 
immigrant to transplant in the New 
York soil — even if in a different 
form — that religious-cultural Jewish 
tradition he had brought with him 
from the Old Country. Were it not 
for the constant influx of new immi- 
grants, were it not for the great 
quantitative rise in numbers of New 
York Jewry, its quality would have 
remained weak, as the quality of 
Jewish life that existed here before 
the great immigration of the 
Eighties began attests to. It was the 
mighty stream of immigrants which 
kept up the Jewish heart-beat of 
New York Jewry. 

Before the arrival of the great 
East - European, Yiddish - speaking 
immigration, Jewish life in New 
York had been developing slowly 
and in a fashion more akin to that 
of other Jewish communities in 
Western lands. The Jewish popula- 
tion was then small in comparison 
with the non-Jewish population 
(today Jews constitute nearly 30 per 
cent of New York's population) and 
its growth was very slow. Jews then 
kept more or less to their tradi- 
tional, European ways. The Spanish- 
Portugues Jews, the "sefardim," de- 



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350 York 
NORFOLK, VA. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



93 



scendants of the earliest settlers, 
held on to Orthodox ritual. The 
German Jews who followed the Sef- 
ardim and who a century ago were 
more numerous in New York City 
than the Russian-Polish Jews also 
adhered to their European Jewish 
ways, even when they made certain 
icrorms in Jewish religious practice. 
In those days New York City still 
maintained the atmosphere of a pro- 
vincial town — -friendship, family loy- 
alty and a feeling of responsibility 
for one's fellow-man were still felt 
keenly, among Christians as among 
Jews. In such an atmosphere a 
strong feeling for Jewish survival 
could also flourish. 

In the space of this article it is 
impossible to give more than a cur- 
sory idea of the colorful 300-year-old 
history of the New York Jewish 
community — if the word "commu- 
nity" can be properly applied to 
New York Jewry, which to this day 
has no central communal organiza- 
tion authorized to speak in behalf 
of all New York Jews. (Attempts to 
create such an organization have 
been made from time to time, but 
they always resulted in failure). 

The history of New York Jewry, 
like the history of the older Ameri- 
can cities on the Atlantic seaboard 
and like the history of British Jewry, 
can be divided into three periods: 
the period of the hegemony of 
the Spanish-Portuguese Jews, which 
lasted around 170 years from the 
establishment of the Jewish colony 
in New Amsterdam until around 
1825, when the German Jews be- 
came more numerous than the Sef- 
ardim; the era of the German "Ya- 
hudim," and finally the period of 
the last half-century when the Jews 
of East-European descent came to 
the forefront by sheer force of num- 
bers. Though the East-European 
Jewish population in New York had 
become larger than the German- 
Jewish population, at the beginning 
of the Nineties of the last century, 



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and perhaps somewhat earlier, the 
German Jews still kept up their 
leadership of New York Jewish life 
because of their wealth and influ- 
ence, in contrast with the poverty 
and insufficient Americanization of 
the Russian, Polish, Galician and 
Rumanian Jews. 

In 1654, when the first shipload 
of Jewish immigrant refugees landed 
in New Amsterdam, Peter Stuyve- 
sant, the anti-Semitic governor of 
the Dutch colony, did not intend 
to let them remain in the colony as 
permanent residents. But the direc- 
tors of the Dutch West Indies 
Company, a private corporation 
which was the real ruler of this 
American colony, interfered in their 
favor and the Jews were allowed to 
remain and conduct business. 

Nevertheless Jews were not al- 
lowed to erect a synagogue, being 
permitted to pray only in private 
homes. Only a generation later 
under British rule, when New Am- 
sterdam became New York, did the 
Jews receive permission to erect 
their first synagogue ,the Spanish- 
Portuguese Shearith Israel, which 
functions to this very day and whose 
old cemetery can still be found in 
the heart of Manhattan. 

At the beginning of the eighteenth 
century New York Jews received cit- 
izenship rights from the British co- 
lonial legislature. Strange to say, 
while Jews received the privilege of 
citizenship, that right was still with- 
held from Catholics. 

During the American colonial pe- 
riod New York Jews were mostly 
engaged in foreign trade. They were 
very well adapted for this kind of 
business because of their family con- 
nections with the American West 
Indies island sand with Europe. The 
richest Jew of those days, Louis 
(Please Turn to Page 103) 





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NEW YEAR GREETINGS 

from 

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Norfolk, Virginia 



Milton Ellerin, attorney and former 
agent for the Federal Bureau of Inves- 
tigations, has been appointed director 
of fact-finding for the Anti-Defamation 
League of B'nai B'rith. 



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94 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 





CHAS. SYER & COMPANY 

BROKERS 

DOMINO SUGAR 



1025 E. Water St. 



Norfolk, Va. 



GROVES 

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Season's Greetings 



Established 1901 



THE NORFOLK 
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OFFICE FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES 
JIMMIE CARTER Phone 4-4384 1 1 3 Brooks Ave. 





GREETINGS 



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1600 MONTICELLO AVENUE NORFOLK, VA. 



Grossinger's — A Jewish Paradise 



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Norfolk's Newest Chinese and American Restaurant 
AIR-CONDITIONED — OPEN II A.M. TO 12 P.M. 
121-123 W. Charlotte St. — Opposite Telephone Building 
NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 



(Continued from Page 35) 



for miles all through the country 
and various towns. One is not lost 
there but at home. 

Now back to our hotel and its ac- 
tivities. Breakfast from 8:00 to 10:00 
A. M. with two waiters serving at 
each table of eight. A copy of menu 
is at the end of this letter. But suf- 
fice it to say, you get enough and 
served up in fashion. Fruits, fruit 
juices, cereals, hot or cold and at 
least ten varieties to pick from. 
Eggs, omelettes, white fish, various 
type of herring and sardines, an- 
chovies, then the Zemmil — all 
kinds, with various types of seeds, 
coffee, tea, milk, etc. At once it re- 
minds you of the record — We're 
gain Essen. Sure do! 

The breakfast and luncheon arc 
milichidike and dinner is meat, or 
Flesidike, no cream in vour coffee 
at night meal, tea or black coffee. 
No smoking Friday night or Satur- 
day. This is observed with rever- 
ence and respect. The meat steaks, 
liver steaks, fish, chopped livers, 
turkeys, capon, the portions — just 
too much to write about. However 
the flavors are supreme, by that I 
mean that even in my travels in 
Europe — many years ago — when 
everything was cheap and good no 
such meals in Berlin, Vienna or 
anvwhere except in Hungary — at a 
rich home, where they know how, 
and here they do know how with it 
100%. 

After breakfast someone is at the 
piano playing Jewish popular and 
old time melodies accompanied bv 



whoever wants to sing and six hun- 
dred or more people could sing. 
From 9:30 to 1:30 A.M. our friend 
(Simple Simon) says gives his ver- 
sion of exercises out on the patio. 
Every word and command is a joke 
and full of wit and humor. The 
people eat so much that they have 
to exercise to keep awake. So a hun- 
dred or more people join the ranks 
of exercising and the rest stand and 
look on listening to the criticism 
which keep you in stitches of 
laughter. 

Then the crowds go to the pool. 
Free lockers and service, free towels 
and lounging chairs, everything free, 
lessons in dancing, lessons on paint- 
ing and art. All supplies gratis. Free 
golfing, tennis, boating, fishing, fish- 
ing lines and bait supplied at no 
charge. Free rides to the lake at the 
pool — one must be entertained let 
alone the beautiful site of seeing 
one thousand or more people 
dressed in all colors and costumes 
lounging on the varied colored 
chairs. 

The scenes are too beautiful for 
words. 

Then comes the entertainment, 
the best. Mr. Emil Cohen who 
speaks in a broken English (pur- 
posely) and translates the Declara- 
tion of Independence, Lincoln's 
Gettysburg address, etc., from Eng- 
lish into Jewish. The words used, 
the expressions and songs with it 
are so funny you just roll in mirth 
and ecstasy, until you feel like a mil- 
lion. (Pleasc Turn t0 Page 97 ) 




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Wishes You a Happy New Year 

H. B. HUNTER CO., Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

Soda Fountain Fruits and Syrups 
NORFOLK • VIRGINIA 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



95 



The Man Who Spoke to Himself 



(Continued from Page 40) 



things said about the water of 
oceans and seas, of rivers and lakes, 
cascading, weaving and looping 
over rock formations. Many times 
more important than the blop of 
neglected faucets. One day some 
one will discover a means of reveal- 
ing the words and messages from 
water currents. He will not be a 
poet. Or maybe he will. Some 
have tried to tell us, in their effu- 
sions, of lyrics that come from the 
flow and sound of water. They 
are probably the only ones inter- 
ested in trying to find out. The 
poets with their rhyme of lines 
attuned to currents of air and water. 
A melting of words with the ele- 
ments. And it would be interesting 
to know how they derive at certain 
messages in their poetry, from the 
tangibles and intangibles of life. 
Maybe a poet will prove another 
Marconi and send messages through 
water. I mean through the waves 
and currents in water, with specially 
conceived receivers at both ends to 
decode or distill whatever was meant 
to be said. 

The day will come, mark my 
words. It is not far off in this day 
and age of supersonics, hypersensi- 
tivities. And when that day comes 
it will be said that The Man Who 
Spoke to Himself on that spring- 
like Sunday afternoon, while walk- 
ing down the Concourse, predicted 
it not too long ago. They thought 
he was crazy. His family did not 
have confidence in him. Did not 
believe in any of his ideas or 
theories. Would not listen to any- 
thing he said or believed in. Scooted 
him out of the house because he 
would not be a puppet. He was 
free with his thoughts when ideas 
came to him. Tried to expound 
them, but they would give neither 
ear or mind to matter. Only harsh 
words, rebuffs: incisions to the 
quick. He was a free man and he 
was walking down the Concourse to 
the clatter and clank and the swish 
and the babble of a mighty confused 
city. 

He was not alone in his freedom 



of thinking, he found out . Almost 
parallel with him but several feet 
away was another man talking. He, 
too, was alone, his lips chattering 
away. There was the blank stare 
in his eyes and haggard face, the 
steady pacing of his legs, blustering 
lips, and sturdy chin. Indepen- 
dence. Independence. He had it 
written all over him. He would 
not take a directive. Not on his 
life! He was not a bov to be played 
with nor a jigger to bounce and 
bustle at the press of a button. 

We were virtually side by side 
and I stopped thinking and tried to 
listen. The mumbling kept abreast 
of me. Now and then I would 
detect a foul word, negatively 
descriptive, swearing at someone the 
likes of which there could be no 
doubt, and all the things she was 
trying to do to him. Names did 
not spout from his muttering, but 
when he said they and she it could 
only mean his family, in-laws, 
nephews and nieces, good-for-noth- 
ing so-and-sos. The same tune, car- 
bon copies of familiar lyrics and 
music. He was not alone, this lost 
soul, wandering along the Con- 
course in this big city of New York. 

There were many more like this 
(Please Turn to Page 99) 




Dr. Louis Finkelstein, Chancellor of 
The Jewish Theological Seminary of 
America, has announced the appoint- 
ment of Dr. Judah Goldin, Dean, 
Teachers Institute and Seminary Col- 
lege of Jewish Studies, as Reader in 
Midrash (rabbinic commentary on the 
Bible) in the Rabbinical School of the 
Seminarv. 





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MAIN OFFICE and PLANT— 801-809 E. 26th St.— NORFOLK, VA. 



96 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



PORTSMOUTH-SUFFOLK, YA. 



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ROANOKE-WEBSTER 
BRICK CO. 

• SUFFOLK, VA. 

• ROANOKE, VA. 
• DRAPER, N. C. 




Irma Koff, Correspondent 



Dear Lonzmen, 

It hardly seems possible that an- 
other year has passed and it's time 
once again to wish you all a very 
happy, healthy, prosperous, and 
peaceful New Year. May the Good 
Lord be with you and yours. 

And because it's now also Sep- 
tember, organizations which have 
sort of "vacationed" during the sum- 
mer, are now bursting forth in a full 
bloom of cativity with big plans 
made for the coming year. 

During the summer, B'nai B'rith 
Women held a membership tea at 
the Suburban Country Club with 
the new District 5 president, Mrs. 
Maurice Goldberg initiating new 
members into the B'nai B'rith 
family. 

The one and only fund-raising 
drive of the year for B'nai B'rith 
Women will take place Sep. 22 at 
the club when the donor luncheon 
is held in celebration of the chap- 
ter's tenth anniversary. A fashion 
show and original skit will highlight 
the ffair. Mrs. Jake Jacobson is 
overall chairman, assisted by Mrs. 
Phil Brodie and Mrs. Jack Laskin. 
Get your tickets now as you won't 
want to miss this big treat. 

Hadassah was also busy during the 
summer integrating new members 
into the organization with indi- 
vidual get-togethers in members' 
homes. 

This organization will open the 
season with a rummage sale right 
after the holidays with all proceeds 



AMERICAN 

Bank & Trust Co. 

Suffolk, Virginia 




going to the Medical Center. The 
annual paid-up membership tea will 
be held at the September meeting 
at which time a reception will be 
held honoring all past presidents of 
the Portsmouth Chapter of Hadas- 
sah. These 15 women will receive 
a past president's pin. 

An outstanding speaker will fea- 
ture the opening program of B'nai 
B'rith lodge and chapter at their 
first Fall meeting. 

The Portsmouth Zionist District 
is also planning a gala first meeting 
when a national speaker will be pres- 
ent. A regional officer will also be 
on hand to install the new local 
ZOA officers. At that time too, five 
delegates and alternates will be 
chosen to attend the national Zion- 
ist convention in New York Oct. 
26-30. 

Congratulations to Mrs. Ruth Sil- 
verman, executive secretary of the 
Portsmouth Jewish Community 
Council, for her re-election as Ports- 
mouth's membership chairman for 
the Sisterhood of the Beth Sholom 
Home for the Aged in Richmond. 

Mrs. Silverman also wants to re- 
mind everyone that a drive for cloth- 
ing, cash donations, canned goods, 
and staples is still going on to aid 
Israel. Just take your stuff to the 
Center or call Mrs. Silverman for 
pick-ups. 

The entire Jewish community was 
saddened at the death of Roderick 
Triplett, husband of Mrs. Lelia J. 
Triplett, society editor of The Ports- 



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Suffolk, Virginia 

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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



97 



mouth Star. Throughout the years, 
Mrs. Triplett has been a good friend 
to the Jewish people in Portsmouth. 
Our sincere sympathy also to the 
Bangel family on the loss of their 
brother and to Mrs. Sam Bord on 
the death of her sister. 

The American-Jewish Time-Out- 
look, which you will have to admit 
is an outstanding magazine, is start- 
ing a drive for new and renewed 
subscriptions. If you want to keep 
up with all of the news of Jewish 
communities in Virginia and North 
Carolina and if you want to read 
many fine articles and stories, we 



suggest that you send in your check 
or money order for $2 to the Out- 
look, Post Office Box 701, Rich- 
mond, Va. Don't delay because the 
longer you do the more news and 
good reading you'll miss. 

Sisterhood will hold its annual 
membership meeting in September. 
During the summer Sisterhood has 
been conducting classes to train 
Sunday School teachers, under the 
direction of Rabbi Leeman. 

That's 30 for now. See you 
around. 

Your friend, 
Irma 



ALEXANDRIA-FREDERICKSBURG, YA. 



Grossinger's — a Jewish Paradise 

(Concluded from Page 94) 
You gain health in such surround- well no matter what ails vou. 



ings, food, laughter and beautiful 
surroundings of nature in the 
clouds. 

Then lunch and again to the pool 
with music, wit, boating and what 
you like. Finally you dress for the 
big dinner. Upon entering such gor- 
geous dining rooms, three in one 
and walk the aisles looking at one 
thousand or more people all dressed 
up and happy you forget your home, 
your business worries and join the 
rest with joy and free-lithkite. 

Immediately after dinner all 
crowd into the saloons around the 
piano for thirty to forty-five minutes 
of songs and singing. Some voices 
are tops. All join, six hundred or 
more. Jewish ditties, Ot Geet Der 
Rebbe and clapping of hands. 
Many, many songs. Old and new 
and catchy. You simply join and 
sing to your heart's content and 
look around to pinch yourself to see 
if you are in a Jewish Heaven. It 
hits the spot and you are happy, 
very happy. You are in love with 
God, with everyone, that is why I 
first said the place is built on Love. 
All the waiters and help love the 
place, the owners and guests all love 
one another. You are bound to get 



I 



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Then all go to the theatre where 
each night a different show. The 
very best talent, singers, dancers, 
commediennes, magicians, even col- 
ored actors — singers of the very best 
and believe it or not the colored 
singers even sing several Jewish 
songs in Jewish, very catchy songs 
that makes your feet go and swells 
your heart with joy. Russia, Ro- 
manian and Hebrew ditties, all 
catchy. 

After the show all are invited to 
go to the Terrace Room where they 
have two bands. One rhumba band 
from Cuba. Besides the leader sing- 
ing, they have a most beautiful girl, 
stunningly dressed and a shape that 
is admired by all, that she wiggles 
like a snake, plays the marimbas and 
dances and sings. It does one good 
to see such beauty dancing and sing- 
ing all for you — a sure thrill. There 
is dancing until 3:00 A. M. Two 
bands changing every thirty min- 
utes. Until now everything free, but 
at the cabaret you pay for the 
drinks, no cover charge and by the 
way the Terrace Room is two ball 
rooms in one, two stages and large 
as the largest ball room anywhere. 

I could write for a week but must 
close, however, the best part of all 
this is that I arrived in broken 
health and spirit and within three 
days I was well and full of life and 
spirit, and in one week— I enjoyed 
the time of my life and ready to 
tackle any job. From now on it is 
Grossinger's for me Ocean Beaches 
— net, Mountains — vou bet. Para- 
dise Bound for Love and happiness, 
good health at Grossinger's. 

ATTENTION! 
WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS 

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HAPPY NEW YEAR 



PRINCESS ANNE 
HOTEL 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 

L. C. SHOEMAKER, Manager 



98 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



NEWPORT NEWS, VA. 



NEWPORT NEWS, YA. 

Mrs. Martha B. Shapiro, Correspondent 



New Year's 



^Greetings 



FROM 



the entire personnel of 



WGH 

affiliate of 

AMERICAN 
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Serving the 
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The Daily Press 
and 
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"The Peninsula's 
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NEWPORT NEWS, VA. 





GREETINGS AND BEST WISHES FROM 



PENINSULA WAR MEMORIAL STADIUM 
NEWPORT NEWS, VA 



Happy New Year from . . . 

HORNE BROS., Inc. 

MARINE REPAIRS • GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
Boiler Repairs - Machine Shop - Iron Workers 
Welding Specialists 
Phone 6-1314 P. O. Box 21 

NEWPORT NEWS, VIRGINIA 




Camp Kadima, Newport News, Va., ended it's 6 weeks of Day Camp with a 
BANG! Everybody had a good time. The children presented their finale in the 
form of a "County Fair" on Wednesday, July 29. The photograph shows the 
Queen Esther and David Groups presenting their number entitled "Do Your 
Ears Hang Low?" Ben Edelman was Day Camp Director and Mrs. Abe 
Nachman was chairman of the day camp committee. 



Jack Lewis 

"DODGERS" 



The Jewish Community Center 
has just completed its second an- 
nual outdoor concert series of 
"Music Under the Stars". All con- 
certs were held at the Center. The 
first concert was a unique one; a 
chamber music recital by the Wood- 
wind Quintet of the Mary Washing- 
ton Summer School of Music. The 
group included Andrew Lolya, flute; 
Melvin Kaplan, oboe, Irving Nei- 
dich, clarinet; Tina di Dario, bas- 
soon; and Earl Chapin, French 
horn. 

Robert Smith, pianist, a local boy, 
was presented at the second con- 
cert. Mr. Smith is a graduate of the 
Philadelphia Conservatory of Music 
and teaches piano at the Girard Col- 
lege in Philadelphia. 

An evening of chamber music 
with several instrumental combina- 
tions was presented on August 13, 
with local artists participating. They 
were Harold and Elizabeth Chap- 
man, Wayne Crouse, Frank Wag- 
ner, Joselyn Cantrell, and Dr. Irving 
Berlin. 

The final concert in the series was 
held on August 27 when the Cru- 



saders from the Hampton Institute 
were presented. Mr. Charles Flax 
directed this fine group of singers. 

All concerts were wonderfully re- 
ceived. Dr. Irving Berlin is chair- 
man of the Center's Music commit- 
tee, and he and his committee hope 
to bring another fine series of con- 
certs to the community in the Fall. 




Hebrew University geolgists supervise 
search for Negev copper. 




The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



99 



The Man Who Spoke to Himself 

(Continued from Page 95) 



man, untold numbers, maybe a 
million in the eight in this great 
Empire of ours, but I did not want 
to meet another. It was bad enough 
to cope with myself. No one would 
have me; I would have no one, not 
a solitary soul and this man and his 
mumbling was not for me. 

I had to get away from him or he 
would haunt me. My assertiveness 
was enough to keep me in Coventry 
for a long time and I did not seek 
a playmate. The answer was the 
subway. I would take it and ride 
downtown, to Times Square, maybe 
to the Battery where you can look 
out at Miss Liberty for what it is 
worth. The subway kiosk is the 
nearest cove leading me to where 
I want to go, and so I descend into 
the bowels of the earth all lighted 
up. Reaching bottom I insert a 
worn-thin dime into a small slit and 
pass through to no exit turnstille. 
Down another cascade of cement 
to a long platform to wait for a 
train that soon rumbles in with con- 
siderable fanfare. Its lights up front 
remind me of a couple of cats 
emerging from a dark passage. 

Many leave the train when it 
comes to a halt. Maybe they have 
been forewarned of my visit. I think 
not. They are going somewhere in 
particular, and this is where they get 
off and I get on. Now, on the train, 
I have decided to go to Times 
Square, the liveliest part of the city 
at this time of day. The train 
rumbles and rattles its connecting 
chains as it bolts on its journey. 
There are seats but I prefer to stand, 
because in standing I can see the 
heads and faces of people. Seated 
I am limited to an immediate area, 
and I do not want to be circum- 
scribed in any sense of the word. 
I have said that before but in other 
words. If I didn't say it exactly as 
you might have expected, now you 
know. I do not want to be im- 
periled by a straight line or a circle 
at any time, for that is a directive no 
free thinking man will permit. 

The gloom of faces, riot of colors 
in dress, variety of lipsticks, weary 



eyes, pallid skins: all bespeaking a 
definitive message. All puppets, the 
men more so than the women with 
strings attached to them, and as you 
look into their faces you can tell 
who operates the strings, who is 
usually the mouthpiece. They sit 
on straw-covered seats like dolls, all 
prettied up for a performance. Won- 
der where that couple facing me 
on the left is going? They seem 
young enough to want to go to a 
movie. Probably the Paramount 
where the inferior combination of 
cheap vaudeville and "B" film could 
satisfy their demands. The elderly 
couple flanking them may be going 
to visit their children, married prob- 
ably and living in some God-for- 
saken development on Long Island. 
If not, then the}' mav be going to 
Radio City where the Music Hall 
show is clone with eclat: the picture 
and stage presentation are outstand- 
ing, far above competitive fodder 
along the street. 

These are the happy couples. 
Why do I bother pointing them 
up? Maybe they are the sweet side 
of the story, representing a well- 
rounded groove I could fall into if 
I wasn't so damned sure myself. 
But there are certain things in life 
that mean everything to a person 
and he lives for them. Surely I live 
for my family and I don't doubt that 
they live for me. But beyond the 
generic term of living, just for the 
living, there is that quality of belief 
in oneself that must be sustained 
in order to have confidence and 
desire to continue on a level not to 
be challenged just by loosening a 
flood of words. Loose words. Empty 
words, meaningless because they 
cannot qualify by glancing at the 
mirror of facts. 

The tiredness of walking and 
standing dictates a seat at the far 
end of the car. There is an empty 
space alongside me and I am happy. 
But directly in front of me sits a 
heavy-set man and I can only see 
one half his face. His nose is long 
and comes almost to a point. He 
has a blue eye, wears a black felt 



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NEWPORT NEWS, VA. 



100 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




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that has seen better days. I must 
have approached the seat near him 
and made use of it without his 
knowing it. He hasn't looked over 
at me since I noticed him. 

Now I do not know this man 
from the engineer who is master 
and director of the car. But it is 
obvious this man is thinking. He is 
thinking ha«d and at the same time 
looking up at the advertisements 
arched into the topside of the train. 
Tliere are the familiar hair, cigarette, 
cereal, dental and other advertise- 
ments to meet the eye. There is 
the soap ad with the orange cake 
cut out sharply to emphasize there 
can be no B. O. after it is used. The 
man near me is thinking as his eyes 
encompass the art work. He must 
have had some kind of bad experi- 
ence which comes to mind because 
he is giving it so much time. 

The train has stopped. One or 
two passengers have taken their 
leave. But this man near me con- 
tinues to read the ads blatantly 
shouting their messages. He has 
now turned his attention to the 
dentifrice, reading every line and I 
can just feel him saying to himself, 
that's a lousy toothpaste! Where 
do thev get off saying it cleans your 
breath as it cleans your teeth? That 
liquor ad: him, what cheap whisky! 
Gee, if I couldn't drink anything 
better I'd stop guzzling tomorrow! 
And the other ads: they all throw 
spots before his eyes. I can tell for 
the man is mumbling to himself, 
little aware that I can hear him. 
But he doesn't know me, doesn't 
even know I exist. He is taking 
each ad and tearing it apart, line 
by line, item by item. 

Enough of him. There is a 
woman sitting comfortable on the 
other side, to the right, and this is 
the first time I have noticed her. 
She must have just gotten on at the 
last station. She is dressed as one 
of moderate means, and now she, 
too, is absorbed in the ads looking 
clown at her. Maybe because she 
likes to read them. Maybe for lack 
of anything alse to do. Her brown 
eves move quickly as she reads 
silently. Suddenly she makes a 
grimace and I am almost tempted 
to turn head upward and see what 
the ad is. Since I don't know the 
woman I say the hell with it. But 
then I do take a look, and there it 
is, a hair wash that undoubtedly 
does nothing or little it sets out to 
do in such prissy words. 

Well, while these people are busy 
reading the ads I'm busy watching 
them. So the next thing that comes 
to mind is to put the two together 
and then what have you got. I'd 



like to wonder but I'd better not. 
I'll be arriving at my station soon 
and I won't have time to finish the 
illusion. So why bother? It's better 
to look around and study people, 
the new ones that have come in 
since I did, and there are a few. I 
can pick them out at a glance and 
they all seem so ordinary I feel I 
ought to forget studying faces. 
Instead, I'll go back to myself, try 
and analyze me, find out what's 
wrong with me, why can't I get 
along with Those I love and love me 
so dearly. 

I don't know. There's nothing 
wrong with me. I don't want to be 
commanded! Now is there anything 
wrong in that? I don't want to be 
directed! I'm an independent cuss 
and I've done all right figuring 
things out for myself, carrying on 
without any major or minor calama- 
ties. I know what I'm doing and 
I've been doing all right. Yes, I 
know I'm talking to myself again. 
So what if I'm mumbling, speaking 
in hushed tones. No one knows 
what is on my mind, and no one 
will. 

The stream of babbling thoughts 
are interrupted by a cessation of 
grumbling wheels at Times Square. 
Here's where I get off. I'm going 
to see what I can do to enjoy myself. 
The legitimate shows, the fine plays 
are closed down on Sundays. What 
a pity! Or is that being selfish? The 
movie houses. Bah! Who wants 
to closet himself in a dark theatre 
watching images blow hot and cold 
on a big screen? Ersatz. Stuff for 
those who cling to make believe. 
I'm a realist, know what I'm saying 
and doing and thinking. I'm not 
shooting my mouth off just because 
I like to hear myself talk. What- 
ever a father or husband says should 
be the law of the family. He can 
be wrong, but not every day, not to 
the point where he must coddle and 
take orders from Wifey Liz or 
daughters Jane and Jenny. Then 



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SMALL BOAT HARBOR 

Phone 4-1444 
NEWPORT NEWS, VA. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



101 



Sonny Joe wants this today. That 
tomorrow. Just like his sisters, 
Wifey. I want this! Get me that! 
Always demanding. This. That. 
Orders. Directives. Always seeking. 
Selfish. Never giving. Greedy. Never 
offering. 

Entertainment? Who could en- 
•v it? Not me! I'll just walk, 
v -cause when I walk I see things 
:«:arer. The air and the openness 
c space give me all the room to 
. ireathe and move in. I'm not to 
• c stifled by claustrophobia, by com- 
i dctness of air or light or space. 

his is the way it must be. Always, 
i ree in movement and free in think- 
i ig. I was born that way and I'm 
I jmg to keep it that way. My 
t imily and I disagree on a lot of 
flings. Most things I should say, 
but directive and objective are two 
points I'll never give in on. That's 
why I'm this way, talking to myself, 
going around studying faces to see 
if I'm wrong, if the other person is 
wrong. What is it that makes a 
person know he's right when he does 
certain things? Stubborness? You 
might call it that, but I think it's 
belief in oneself, standing rock- 
bound with implicit faith in the 
teachings handed down to you, the 
will and desire for kindness and 
understanding, and the feeling you 
can only be sincerely implicit when 
you are combed out from the rest, 
torn away so that you are not 
stamped with an impression the 
same as so many others, but that you 
have the roots and the stems and 
the water and the soil to originate 
and build your own opinions, and 
the years of golden and red-balled 
sunlight have brought vision to your 
tree of knowledge. So there you 
rest, on roots and stems, untold sun- 
lights, having taken from nature its 
best water, its richest soil and its 
abundant sun to fructify. In these 
you are willing to acknowledge as 
basic essentials of understanding. 
You will not compromise. The food 
of the mind and body have come 
from the soil and water and sun. 
The amount of food one takes may 
vary appreciably in some more than 
others; and it does. And that not 
only applies to what is consumed 
by the body, but also by the mind. 

There is a sea of fact in this tidal 
wave of humanity tearing down 



Broadway. In many you seem to 
be able to tell the extent of their 
physical and mental food absorb- 
tion. At least that is how you view 
it. Frankly there is too much con- 
fusion to even try and find an 
answer to who is directing and who 
is being directed. Anything goes in 
this overwhelming wave upon wave, 
like a wooden box being tossed on 
the crest to wherever the wind 
points: all puppets in an amphi- 
theatre or mediocrity, stupidity and 
blindness. There is no room for 
me there. I must move on, off the 
street. 

Into the subway again, down to 
the Battery and there to watch the 
crowds going to and from Miss 
Liberty, standing aloof on a small 
island with her torch, twenty 
minutes out by boat. The faces are 
all joyous as they disembark. 
Anxious eyes alight and another 
boat is about to leave. There is 
gayety, happiness. Cameras, sight- 
seeing buses unloading cargoes look- 
ing upon France's gift to the U. S. 
for the first time. Awe strikes the 
air with an echo, for it is truly a 
rare and long-to-be-remembered 
sight. It is time and again that I 
have seen it, having ferried to the 
small Island and hiked with panting 
determination up to the crown to 
look out upon the sweeping pano- 
rama below. 

I spend hours watching the faces 
and they have come from all over 
the United States. You can even 




Isaac Hamlin, General Secertary of the 
National Committee for Labor Israel 
(Histadrut), has returned form a seven- 
week visit to Israel where he was re- 
ceived by President Ben Zvi, with 
whom he was frequently associated in 
former years when the President visited 
America several times on Histadrut 
missions. 



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NEWPORT NEWS, VIRGINIA 

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New Year Greetings . . . from 



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34th and Huntington Avenue 
NEWPORT NEWS, VA. 




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102 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



WILLIAMSBURG, YA. 




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tell the foreigners, the mixtures of 
languages in the air, and I like to 
witness all this, for here is life that 
has come a long way to see this 
Lady of Liberty. From all over the 
world. And every corner of the 
United States. My family has not 
yet seen it and all have been born 
within a matter of miles of it. It 
is only another instance of their 
stubborness, not listening to me. I 
am ashamed to admit this, like 
many other things, and there is no 
earthy reason for such carryings-on, 
neglect, refusal to reason. 

The hours for me have been well 
spent, for night has pierced the 
curtain of daylight. The boats ferry- 
ing back and forth to the statue are 
limited now. Soon they will stop 
altogether. The darkness hides a 
lot of expressions and impressions, 
so it is better to be on my way. It 
will be lonely here and I cannot 
stay. I must not get lost in this 
deserted area. No. Better to be 
lost among people in this big city, 
a friendly and curious peoples, most 
with confusion apparent as an 
excuse and challenge. 

Into the bowels of the earth 
again. Once more the lights wel- 
come me with a warmth uniquely 
gratifying after hours in the open. 
Into the car idly waiting and onto 
a hard matted seat. I am tired after 
watching all that happiness around 
me. Many of those who have just 
come from the Island are returning 
home on the same train. They are 
talking, buzzing busily about this 
sight and that, some with souvenirs 
for themselves, relatives, children: a 
pervasion of gayety, a blessing to 
behold. Yet, despite it, I am trying 
to ferret out a disappointed man 
or woman. One who has had to 
face the severity of a blustering 
directive, one who cannot find peace 
and quiet and love and endearment 
unless he or she becomes subjective. 
He or she is hard to find. There is 
no mumbling, no lips moving slyly. 
All one can see and hear is chatter, 
a confusion of happy babbling, 
cheerful faces and contented eyes: 
confusion on a lark. 

There is a stop at Times Square. 
Some get off. Many come on. The 
newcomers are as cheerful as those 
who have left. They have come 
from places of merriment and enter- 
tainment. It is written on their 
faces, reflected in their eyes for all 
to see. 

New babble has been added to 
the variety which began at the Bat- 
tery. At 125th Street some get off, 
others get on. They add to the 
confusion. The left-overs from the 



Battery have quieted down. At the 
next stop, the noise and bluster 
lessens as many leave to walk the 
last lap home. There are not many 
more stops until my station. As we 
get nearer to it the passenger total 
dwindles considerable. I am almost 
afraid to think of my stop coming 
in a few minutes. 

I am afraid of the night and the 
confusion awaiting me, a confusion 
insoluble to the end. 




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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



103 



300 Years of New York Jewry 

(Continued from Page 93) 



Gomez, was the owner of a number 
of ships that would carry wheat to 
Portugal and other products to Am- 
sterdam, Hamburg and Dublin. 

When the American Revolution 
started and the thirteen British col- 
onies declared their independence 
of England, New York Jews were di- 
vided in their sentiments, some sid- 
ing with the revolutionaries, others 
with the loyalists. Immediately after 
the revolution the small New York 
Jewish community began to rise in 
wealth and influence. Jews were 
among the founders in 1782 of the 
New York Stock Exchange, today's 
world-famous "Wall Street." Jews 
became wealthy realtors, entered the 
fur business, established factories of 
various sorts. 

For more than a century and a 
half the Sefardic Shearith Israel was 
the only synagogue in New York 
City. It was strictly Orthodox and 
exercised a rigorous control over the 
private religious life o fits members. 
In 1757, for instance, its trustees an- 
nounced that Jews who do not at- 
tend services, who keep their places 
of business open o nthe Sabbath, 
who eat non-kosher food or commit 
"other terrible crimes" will be re- 
fused Jewish burial. Gradually how- 
eever these strict regulations were 
abolished. 

The first Jewish school for chil- 
dren in New York was established 
by Congregation Shearith Israel in 
1731 and was called "Yeshivath 
Minhath Erev." At the beginning 
of the nineteenth century it was 
converted into a day school where 
the children were taught reading 
and writing, English and arithmetic, 
as well as Hebrew. But as the Jew- 
ish population kept growing the 



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state of Jewish education in New 
York became less and less satisfac- 
tory to those who had Jewish sur- 
vial at heart. Many parents became 
indifferent to the matter of giving 
their children a Jewish education, 
and so the number of Jewish edu- 
cational institutions was very small 
compared to the real need, while the 
few that were established did not 
receive sufficient support. And even 
in the present East-European era, 
when Talmud T'orahs, late-after- 
noon supplementary schools, are 
closing, when the Orthodox Day 
Schools have hard sledding finan- 
cially and when Reform and Con- 
servative Sunday Schools arc found 
to give too meagre a Jewish educa- 
tion, Jewish education remains the 
sorest Jewish problem in New York. 

In 1825, as mentioned before, the 
hegemony of the Sefardim over New 
York Jewish life came to an end. In 
that year the German Jews, who had 
become a majority of the New York 
Jewish population, established their 
B'nai Jeshurun Synagogue which 
used the Ashkenazic, rather than the 
Sefardic, ritual. This synagogue, 
which still functions today under 
the leadership of Rabbi Israel Gold- 
stein and is one of the leading Con- 
servatie congregations in the coun- 
try, was in the beginning strictly 
Orthodox. In its early years it would 
correspond with the Chief Rabbi of 
England and ask his opinion on 
matters of Jewish religious law, 
matters relating to marriage, divorce, 
mikvah and so on. 

More than a century ago the Ger- 
man Jews became influential in the 



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general life of New York and began 
to put into the shade the rich, as- 
similated Sefardim. They conducted 
large businesses and were leaders in 
the communal life. But their Jew- 
ish education was slight. Isaac M. 
Wise, founder of American Reform 
Judaism, stated in 1847 that except 
for two men, Leo Merzbacher and 
Max Lilienthal, there wasn't one 
Jewish communal leader who could 
read Hebrew without the vocal in- 
dications or who knew anything 
about the literature or history of 
Jewry. 

During the years of the American 
Civil War, 1861-65, New York 
Jewry had grown to such an extent 
that 2,000 Jewish soldiers from New 
York City were to be found in the 
Northern armies that were fighting 
the Southern Confederates. During 
this war the banking firm of Selig- 
man was for a time the financial 
agent of the Federal Government. 
On the question of maintaining 
Negro slavery American Jews were 
then divided in their opinion, just 
as their opinion had been divided 
during the Revolutionary War on 
the matter of American independ- 
ence. One New York rabbi, Mi- 
chael Halpern, during the Civil War 
conducted a verbal battle with an- 
other rabbi who had maintained 
that the Bible tolerates human 
slavery. 

Reform Judaism in New York 
started among the German, not the 
Sefardic, Jews, even though the Sef- 
ardim were a more Americanized 
and a wealthier element than were 
the Germans in the beginning. 
Even before the Civil War there 
were established the German Re- 
form synagogues, Beth-El and Em- 
anu-el. Todav Temple Emanu-el, 



which stands on aristocratic Fifth 
Avenue and was built at a cost of 
$7,000,000, is the richest Jewish syn- 
agogue in the world. 

The first Orthodox synagogue of 
Eastern Jews in New York, the Beth 
Medrash Ha'Godol, which today re- 
mains standing on its original site 
on the Lower East Side, was also 
founded before the Civil War, in 
1859. Although the Russian-Polish 
Jews were then small in numbers, 
they already had enough numerical 
strength to erect an imposing syna- 
gogue structure, to quarrel among 
themselves over a "shohet" and to 
start a second shul. 

The last phase of New York Jew- 
ish history, the East-European one, 
is so recent that many people who 
are still alive have themselves ex- 
perienced almost its entire course. 
During this era New York Jewry re- 
ceived a mighty blood transfusion 
from Russia, Poland, Galicia and 
Rumania and became the greatest, 
wealthiest and most influential Jew- 
ish community in the whole world. 
During this era New York Jewry 
began to exert a tremendous influ- 
ence not only upon the rest of 
American Jewry but also upon the 
Jewries of other countries. From 
New York was conducted the great 
relief effort on behalf of European 
Jewry during and after World War 
I, mainly through the Joint Distri- 
bution Committee. And from New 
York, too, there came the leadership 
after World War II in the fight for 
the establishment of the state of 
Israel. 

New York is the headquarters of 
the World Jewish Congress, of the 
World Congress for Yiddish Cul- 
ture, of the Yiddish Scientific Insti- 
tute and of every leading American 



BURTON P. 

SHORT and SON 

Petersburg, Virginia 



wishes you a very happy 





The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



105 




Jesse Moss ot JNew York (R), National Commander of the Jewish War Veterans 
of the United States, is shown at a meeting with Secretary of State John Foster 
Dulles in Washington. The JWV Commander took issue with the conclusions 
voiced by Mr. Dulles after his tour of the Middle East and urged U. S. 
leadership to establish Middle East Defense Organization "as the best means 
of bringing peace to the area and creating an effective force against Com- 
munist aggression." 



Jewish organization with the ex- 
ception of B'nai B'rith, whose 
general headquarters are in Wash- 
ington, though its Anti-Defamation 
League's main office is also in New 
York. Here are to be found the 
main American Jewish theological 
seminaries and the national head- 
quarters of Conservative, Reform 
and Orthodox Jewries. The two 
leading Yiddish dailies, "Forward" 
and "Dav-Journal ", are published 
here, as well as a number of Yid- 
dish weeklies and monthlies and 
Jewish books, in English and He- 
brew. Here are to be found most 
Jewish actors, musicians and 
painters. 

It's a world in itself, this Jewish 
New York, yet bound with a hun- 
dred ties to the rest of world Jewry. 
It is the cultural center for Ameri- 
can Jewry, and to a large extent also 
for the Jewries of Latin America and 
other countries. From here Jewish 
cultural antennae are spread out to 
the four corners of the earth. It is 
some comfort that such a center 
should exist after the decimation of 
six million Jews in Europe. 

Next year, the 300th birthday of 
the oldest Jewish community in 




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North America, will be celebrated 
by all American Jews as their own 
holiday. Great preparations are now 
in progress for this celebration. Jews 
in other countries, to whom Amer- 
ica during the past couple of cen- 
turies symbolized freedom, hope, 
rescue, opportunity, will no doubt 
want to partake in this festival, the 
celebration of the birth of Jewish 
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This stylized head of stone was dis- 
covered at Shaar Hagolan during the 
excavation of a village of the Neolithic 
Age. The site was discovered in 1942 
on the banks of the Yarmuk River, 
during an archeological survey of the 
Jordan Valley. The material found 
shows that the economy of the Yar- 
mukian population was horticulture in 
its most primitive stage, and, according 
to the late Dr. M. Stekelis, noted Israel 
archeologist, one of its outstanding fea- 
tures is its art objects. Carving and 
engraving were practiced to produce ob- 
jects having ritual significance in con- 
nection with the fertility cult of a pure 
matriarchate. The presence of such art 
work leads to the conclusion that the 
inhabitants possessed a highly developed 
spiritual life. 



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106 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA. 



Tolstoi, the Arab King and the Artist 

(Concluded from Page 84) 



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taken their place. At long last, I 
am what I am." 

Tolstoi was delighted with the 
story. He realized how it fitted him, 
the moral teacher, who had in his 
early life been a debauchee, and how 
edifying, too, was its object lesson 
to so many men who if thev but 
willed it, might convert evil into 
good and recreate themselves, as it 
were, by dint of individual effort, in 
order to attain their own happiness, 
and to help others attain theirs. 

Great is the art of writing music 
and literature. Great, too, is the art 
of sculpturing figures of stone and 
bronze. But greater still is the art 
of bringing about one's own regen 
eration. 

The name Sodom conjures up 
many associations. It was the great 
ancient den of sin and inquity. 
Wickedness flourished there like the 
proverbial green bay tree. Accord- 
ing to rabinical legend, so wicked 
was Sodom that anyone giving a 
hungry man bread or performing an 
act of charity or mercy was con- 
demned to death. The wrath of God 
descended upon it and was swal- 
lowed up entire. The earth split 
and sucked in the entire city. 

So the new highway to Sodom 
will not be of any use to such as 
may be attracted by the lure of sin 
and vice. In fact, so completely 
have all vestiges of the ancient city 
been eliminated, that no one is sure 
today exactly where ancient Sodom 
was located. There is still an odd- 
looking stone about which legend 
says it is Lot's wife. According to 
the Bible, Mrs. Lot looked back 
when she was told to flee with her 
husband and was turned into a pil- 
lar of salt. 

Built with funds from the Israel 
bonds, the new road to Sodom will 
provide easier access to the Dead 
Sea and help in the exploitation of 
its rich mineral deposits. 

With the new road, Beersheba 
and Sodom are only 48 miles apart. 
This is thirty-three miles les sthan 
the old route, which detoured south 
to Ein Tusub and then comes north 
again to Sodom, closely paralleling 
the border, which made it an easy 
target for Arab raiders. The old 
road is now broken and almost im- 
passable, even by vehicles specially 
equipped with four-wheel drive. 

The new road is remarkable for 
more than its historic associations. 
Take the time when a crew of the 
road workers came to a precipice 
looking down a huge chasm below. 



The Arabs call the chasm Wadi El 
Mazal. (Lucky Gulch). 

Cutting chunks of mountain was 
nothing new to the crews working 
on this road. They have portable 
quarry equipment accompanying 
them just for that purpose. With 
it, building materials were hewed 
and hacked right out of the neigh- 
boring hillsides and mountains. The 
construction of the road represents 
a feat in engineering. 

Few road building jobs have had 
to contend with more unusual con- 
trasts in terrain. You go from high 
to low as nowhere else on earth. In 
fact, the Sodom terminus of the 
road, the Dead Sea, is the lowest 
point on earth, 1300 feet below sea 
level. At the other end — Beersheba 
rises just about the same number of 
feet above sea level. 

Beersheba has become a chief 
center for the industries growing 
out of the newly discovered min- 
erals of the Negeb, copper, kaolin, 
phosphates and even iron. The Is- 
rael bonds which have pioneered 
the development of this mineral 
wealth in helping build the road 
tying up Beersheba with the Dead 
Sea is thus contributing in a two- 
fold way to the economic develop- 
ment of the country. 

The wealth of the Dead Sea and 
the minerals of the Negeb have 
scarcely been tapped as yet, even 
though it is now definitely known 
that King Solomon worked the cop- 
per mines. The Dead Sea is re- 
garded as the richest aquatic treas- 
ure of minerals in the world, hold- 
ing enourmous supplies of postas- 
sium chloride, sodium chloride, cal- 
cium, magnesium and bromides. 

The Dead Sea has also become a 
favorite recrational area for Israel. 
Swimming in the Dead Sea has no 
terrors for the most timid. It is a 
physical impossibility to drown in it 
on account of the high saline qual- 
ity of the water. The salts may, it 
is true, irritate the eyes, if they man- 
age to get in, but one quickly learns 
how to avoid that. 




Morticians 

Harrisonburg, 




i 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



107 



Julian Mack 

(Continued from Page 64) 



HARRISONBURG-WAYNESBORO, VA. 



nated by the brilliant, if somewhat 
erratic, Emil G. Hirsh. This re- 
formed Rabbi set the tone of a 
Judaism that held Sabbath services 
on Sunday and hinted vaguely at a 
nebulous faith that might dispense 
with the stern Jehovah. His melt- 
ing pot ideal could but lead to ab- 
sorption into the Gentile majority. 
The positive virtue of this attenu- 
ated religion was philanthropy. 
Judge Mack listened to the scintil- 
lating sermons at Temple Sinai and 
served on committees collecting and 
dispensing charity. The pogroms of 
Kishineff, Homel, Odessa, and Bia- 
lestock in 1903-05 brought home the 
need of organized effort to achieve 
full rights for Jews everywhere and 
abrogate such laws as discriminated 
against them. An ideal type of 
Western Jew, reformed, integrated 
and in accord with the modern 
views of temperamental Rabbi 



Hirsh, Judge Mack was chosen vice- 
president of the newly formed 
American Jewish Committee and 
member of its executive. 

Judge Mack's reputation as a 
jurist, a humanitarian, a progres- 
sive in education, a liberal in public 
affairs, kept mounting. During the 
First World War his diverse labors 
were arduous enough for five men. 
Workers and management accepted 
him as umpire for the War Labor 
Board. His equitable humanity was 
recognized when Woodrow Wilson 
appointed him Chairman of the 
Board to review the treatment of 
conscientious objectors. There was 
no provision in the Military Manual 
nor precedents in the law to guide 
the Board, on which served Harlan 
F. Stone, later Chief Justice of the 
U. S. Supreme Court. In the past 
conscietious objectors were treated 
with contempt and brutality. Yet 




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108 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



DANVILLE, VA. 




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the bona fide had to be sifted from 
the dubious. The Board also had to 
examine the court-martial records of 
the convicted. Justice Stone subse- 
quently wrote, "For the successful 
prosecution of this important work, 
there could not have been a more 
ideal man than Judge Mack." Simi- 
lar praise was accorded him for work 
with the Federal Commission, 
which drew up the insurance law 
for Veterans of World War I. 

Zionism 

And yet his Jewish virtues were 
largely in the negative. Charity, 
tacit assimilation, the activities of a 
self-appointed American Jewish 
Committee responsible only to it- 
self belonged to the era of philan- 
thropy and shtadlanuth that was 
passing. The new currents affected 
Justice Brandeis and transformed 
him into a crusader of militant Jew- 
ish nationalism. The abnormal sta- 
tus of a homeless nation must be 
changed by the concerted efforts of 
the entire Jewish people. Jewish 
resettlement in Palestine would pro- 
vide a home and cultural center for 
the wandering tribes whose creative 
impulses were dissipated or frag- 
mentized among many nations, 
hence ignored or even denied by a 
vicious anti-Semitism. The example 
of Brandeis, the dissertations of Fe- 
lix Frankfurter, the achievements of 
the Yishuv in Palestine turned Judge 
Mack into a fervent Zionist. 

Events were moving rapidlv. Rev- 
olutionary forces in Russia swept 
away the feeble minded Czah Nich- 
olas, his corrupt bureaucracy, the 
fanatic orthodox hierarchy, the 
Black Hundred pogromists. In No- 
vember 1917, Lord Balfour issued 
his declaration favoring a Jewish 
homeland in Palestine. General Al- 
lenby's forces, which included a 
Jewish Legion, captured Jerusalem. 
Woodrow Wilson advocated the 
self-determination of small nations. 
A Peace Conference would meet at 
Versailles to right the wrongs of the 
submerged and downtrodden. 

Together with the Zionist lead- 
ers, Judge Mack sensed the supreme 
moment for the Jewish people to 
make its just demands. But the 
Jewish case must not be pleaded by 
the backstairs shtadlan or through 
the well-wishing Gentile. The anti- 
Zionist American Jewish Commit- 
tee could obviouslv not be the ad- 
vocate of a national homeland. The 
Jewish masses were restive. Democ- 
racy became the battle cry. The 
group about Justice Brandeis de- 
vised machinery for an election to 
the American Jewish Congress, 
which would formulate in demo- 
cratic procedure the expressed 



wishes of Jews in the U.S.A. Judge 
Mack resigned from the executive 
of the self-perpetuating American 
Jewish Committee. Instead he sat 
in Paris as a delegate of the Ameri- 
can Jewish Congress as one of the 
ten spokesmen of American Jewry. 
He was also chairman of all the 
Jewish Delegations before the Peace 
Conference. The Versailles world 
tribunal agreed to minority rights 
for Jews in certain European lancis 
and favored a Jewish homeland a> 
Palestine under the Mandate o A 
Britain. 

Services 

While Judge Mack was president 
of the Z.O.A. the bitter fight over 
the methods of rebuilding the na- 
tional home culminated. The Bran- 
deis-Mack group withdrew from ac- 
tive participation after the Weiz- 
mann victory and confined them- 
selves purely to economic invest- 
ments in Palestine. Yet Judge Mack 
resumed his work with various 
Zionist agencies. In spite of bad and 
failing health, he never shirked the 
unpleasant chore of appealing for 
funds at dinners and meetings. 

The Harvard Incident 

An important service rendered by 
Judge Mack has been strangely over- 
looked. In the 1920s American 
Jewry was threatened on two fronts: 
the revived Ku Klux Klan and the 
anti-Semitic smear in Henry Ford's 
Dearborn Independent. It seemed 
timely for A. Lawrence Lowell, Pres- 
ident of Harvard, to introduce the 
European numerous clauses in 
American education. But Judge 
Mack was a member of the Board 
of Overseers at Harvard College and 
active in other organizations of the 
University. Without his sharp op- 
position to such prejudice and snob- 
bery, Jewish students might now be 
rationed in limited quotas at many 
American colleges, which would 
have gladly followed the lead and 
example of Harvard. 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



109 



The Meaning of Academic Freedom 

(Continued From Page 17) 



the stock of weapons is strictly lim- 
ited to better ideas. . . . 

. . . The tests of scholastic capac- 
ity are of an exacting nature, con- 
cerned rather with the quality of 
mind and integrity of intellectual 
performance than with the political 
complexion of a man's beliefs. . . . 

. . . The scholar's work leads him 
to the frontiers of knowledge . . . 
he blazes new trails in thought. In- 
stead of accepting authority, he in- 
vestigates the substance of its foun- 
dations, and should these prove 
false or rotten, the scholar is obliged 
to warn the world. . . . 

. . . But in time of tense conflict, 
or violently competing ideas, of fear, 
insecurity and confusion, many peo- 
l pie contend that the staunchest ad- 
j vocates of intellectual freedom are 
corrupters, subverters of all social 
values, and must therefore be si- 
lence. In Greece there was a Soc- 
; rates, in Germany, a Martin Luther, 
I in Italy Galileo Galilei. Stubborn 
' men these, curious men, pecular 
and disturbing men who dared chal- 
lenge the very gods and the rules 
of the earth, for the sake of con- 
: science, in service of truth. . . . 

. . . Unless the teacher is free to 
; question and dissent, the student's 
mind will emerge from school, not 
strong with wisdom, but at best 
heavy with information. The teacher 
who tailors his opinions to the cut 
of popular pressure will hardly en- 
courage bold inquiry in his class- 
room. . . Men who will one day 
govern themselves must first learn 
to think for themselves. . . . 

. . . There is no greater challenge 
to test the mettle of democracy's 
defenders than the current threat to 
academic freedom. Since the "cold 
war" has become warmer in Korea, 
havoc-crying patriots and under- 
standably worried democrats have 
successfully managed to trim the 

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wings of . . . (academic) . . . freedom 
... A far greater danger than any 
statutory restriction threatens the 
life of academic freedom — the sub- 
tle and silent fear, self-censorship. 
No university is an island divorced 
from the passions of the commu- 
nity out of which it has sprung. 
When the social atmosphere is 
charged with suspicion and clam- 
ors for conformity, when in the 
market place the greys of opinion 
are increasingly forced into areas 
of black or white, when the mere 
suspension of judgment on subjects 
of vital controversy is labelled 
"abetting the enemy" . . . instruc- 
tors become more cautious, stu- 
dents cynical and apathetic about 
the very issue that will most strongly 
affect their future lives and the lives 
of their children. . . . 

. . . The "sins" of youth are not 
lightly absolved today, and the as- 
piring government employee, the ap- 
prentice public school teacher, to- 
morrow's engineer or "top secret" 
scientists, the ambitious lawyer-in- 
embryo, all take great pains to avoid 
any costly "taint." The most contro- 
versial books are too often left un- 
opened, the most controversial 
speeches too often heard by too 
few, and for lack of an opposing 
team, the most stimulating debates 
are resolved without argument . . . 
Freedom is lost or won in the minds 
of men long before it is legislated 
out of or into existence. A nation 
suspicious and fearful of her "intel- 
lectuals," of her scientists and edu- 
cators, her thinkers and serious stu- 
dents, cannot retain the respect of 
the world or dare aspire to its lead- 
ership. . . . 




This miniature Bronze bust of the 
Greek god of the sun, Helios (Roman 
period), was found in the Jerusalem 
region. It measures about 3V£ inches 
in height. Note the resemblance to 
the Statue of Liberty. 



23rd Anniversary Year 



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Monuments of Distinction 
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NEW YEAR GREETINGS 





HOLSUM BAKING CO. 

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110 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




NEW YEAR 
GREETINGS 



RICHMOND, VA. 



New Installations 
and Service on 




Westbrook Elevator 

Manufacturing Company 




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Agents for 
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. . . There are no ideas or ideolo- 
gies abroad in the world today 
strong enough to defeat the untar- 
nished tenets of democracy. Are all 
eyes open to the rights of men with- 
out regard to their color creed? — let 
them look to America. And let us 
look into our schools, insisting upon 
a policy of admission based on each 
candidate's abilities, nor on the com- 
plexion or beliefs of his parents. Is 
it freedom humanity craves, is it 
peace, is it equality of opportunity? 
— let them learn by America's ex- 
ample. But not the example of im- 
itating nations which fear the po- 
tent force of unrestricted inter- 
change of scientific ideas, denying 
visas and passports to eminent sci- 
entists and scholars for whom face- 
to-face discussion at professional 
congresses is an indispensable stim- 
ulus to creative endeavor. . . . 

. . . Freedom will not be saved 
by men who have so little faith in 
her strength that with every sign of 
totalitarian attack they flee from her 
finest outposts and race into the 
arms of tyranny and suppression. 
Those who would shield our youth 
from the dangers of incitment for- 
get Oliver Wendell Holmes' state- 
ment that "every idea is an incite- 
ment." Those who insists their only 
interest is national security forget 
Mill's warning that "A State which 
dwarfs her men, in order that they 
may be more docile instruments in 
its hands even for beneficial pur- 
poses — will find that with small 
men no great thing ca nreally be 
accomplished." 

Daily the meaning of academic 
freedom is defined by the student 
who insists upon his right to be 
guided, not led or driven in the di- 
rection of truth and understanding; 
by the teachers who resists all doc- 
trinaire shackles, faithfull following 
the light of reason and conscience; 
by the administrator who values 
free inquiry above the largess of 
monetary endowments. . . . 

ATTENTION! 
WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS 

Obtaining subscriptions or renew- 
als for the American Jewish Times- 
Outlook is an ideal way of raising 
money for your projects or general 
fund. Write for full particulars. 



Extracts From the 2nd Prize 
Winning Essay of R. N. 
Clewell, Allentown, Pa. 

. . . We lose a sense of calmness 
if we countenance the idea that 
the intense struggle for and against 
freedom, of which we read daily in 
our newspapers, is a unique re- 
sponse to a unique situation. . j 
Those who would teach men to 
think for themselves seem always to 
be confronted by those who preach 
the same old gospel that "an undis- 
turbed life is worth everything." . . . 

. . . The United States, having 
fought two world wars in a single 
generation, conscious of the seem- 
ingly uncontrollable terror she has 
unleashed in the atom bomb, tired 
and tense from some vague kind of 
"battle for men's minds" called the 
cold war, startled by "disclosures" of 
spies — some real and some not so 
real, and despairing from the trag- 
edy of Korea, is probably more sus- 
ceptible to attacks on individual lib- 
erty, more ripe for hysteria than any 
nation in history. It is in such a 
context that we must view the 
plight of academic freedom today — 
the loyalty oaths in three-fourths of 
our states, the dismissals of able 
teachers on the basis of guilt by as- 
sociation, the attempts of legisla- 
tures and numerous private "com- 
mittees' 'and "councils" to censor 
textbooks and destroy character, the 
sinister attempts to engender mass 
distrust of the "intellectuals" by 
branding them as "pink" or "sub- 
versive." . . . We are fast approach- 
ing in the realm of education a 
point which, I fear, we have already 
reached in other realms of our na- 
tional life, a situation aptly de- 
scribed by Francis Biddle as "the 
new and simplified world" where 
"all is black or white, loyal or dis- 
loyal, one-hundred-per-cent Ameri- 
can or dirty Communist." 

Since the failure of the House 
Un-American Activities Committee 
in its attempt, in June 1949, to cen- 
sor textbooks used in colleges and 
universities ,the surveillance of edu- 
cation has become a prized province 



BELK-LEGGETT CO. 

"DANVILLE'S SHOPPING CENTER" 

DANVILLE, VIRGINIA 



wishes you a very 



4Jg|| 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



111 



of the state legislatures ,and those 
state-supported institutions which 
struggle under the power of the 
purse and the investigating power 
of state legislators, have become the 
most vulnerable to attacks upon ac- 
ademic freedom. It is here we most 
need to fear that stultifying "kind of 
natural selection by which the safe, 
the timid, the orthodox— or the in- 
different—survive." In small private 
colleges, usually dependent for 
funds on business interests or small 
groups of influential alumni, the 
jower of the purse can also become 
he power to stiflle free thought, 
fhe bulwark of academic freedom, 
irom which must come the inspira- 
tion in the struggle, are the large, 
heavily-endowed private institutions 
with strong traditions of freedom 
based on financial security and 
pride in intellectual achievement. . . 

. . . Obviously academic freedom 
is a necessity for guarding the in- 
tegrity of the teaching profession 
just as codes of practice are neces- 
sary in any profession to insure its 
integrity and to separate legitimate 
practice from quackery. . . . 

, . . The justification of academic 
: reedom rests on what we may call 
a dynamic theory of truth, in which 
truth is not a product but a process. 
By whatever method knowledge is 
obtained, sense experience, reason, 
intuition, it must be subjected to 
the critical examination of subse- 
quent knowledge, gleaned from 
every possible quarter of human ex- 
perience. . . . 

, . . Human personality is the 
lighest value which we are given 
to know in this universe; ultimately, 
then, all human endeavor and all 



HOWELL NURSERIES 

For Complete Landscape Planning 
and Planting Service 

PHONE 3-2426 
2649 Boyd's Bridge Road S.E. 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



institutions must receive their final 
evaluation and justification by the 
degree to which they satisfy the 
needs and fulfill the capacities of 
human personality. The dynamic 
theory has produced in the field of 
natural science almost inexhaustible 
stores of knowledge which have been 
used, to a small extent, for the ulti- 
mate end, human welfare. Their 
full utilization is prevented only by 
the backwardness of those areas of 
knowledge which deal with human 
relations, areas in which the dy- 
namic theory has not yet come into 
vogue. It is an ironical fact that in 
these very areas, the fields we call 
the humanities and social sciences 
— ethics, literature, history, political 
science, economics, sociologv, psy- 
chology, where the problems are the 
most complex and the most vital, 
where "facts" are scarce and all 
statements indeed hypothetical, 
where freedom of inquiry and dis- 
cussion is most necessarv, academic 
freedom is in the most precarious 
situation, precisely because, in these 
areas, no only men's beliefs are at 
stake, but their emotions and often 




This stone Menorah was found in Ti- 
berias and dates back to the 3rd Cen- 
tury A.D. 




Axes, spearheads and arrowheads of the 
third and second millenium B.C. were 
used as implements of war. Some of 
these belong to the period of the patri- 
archs. They are on loan from the col- 
lection of Dr. Walter Moses, Tel Aviv, 
Israel. 



MANN 
MORTUARY 

ESTABLISHED 1884 



414 West Church Avenue 
Telephone 2-1129 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



I 
i 

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BUILDING MATERIALS 



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COCKRUM 

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"The Old Reliable" 



Ninth Avenue at Southern Railway 



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SOUTHERN CAST STONE COMPANY 

INC. 

Everything for a Fire Proof Building 

Sutherland Ave. N.W. and Concord St. 
PHONE 4-3352 

Knoxville, Tennessee 



HIGHLAND'S GRILL 

4705 Old Kingston Pike S.W. — on Routes 11 and 70 
Fine Steaks and Sea Foods Banquet Facilities 

Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 

Dial 8-1912 Knoxville, Tennessee 




From Your 



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112 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



EAST TENNESSEE \\ 



FINANCIAL CENTER OF 

HAMILTON NATIONAL BANK 

OF KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 

531 S. GAY ST. 

WEST KNOXVILLE BRANCH NORTH KNOXVILLE BRANCH 
Cumberland at 19th Broadway at Fifth Ave. 




SALES 



SERVICE 



Season's Greetings from 

HULL-DOBBS 

Telephone 5-5101 
Market and Cumberland Ave. 
KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 



I BRITTON MOTORS 

\ Your Packard Dealer 

| 521-523 N. Gay St. 

j Knoxville, Tenn. 



j 

Dial 4-8666 \ 

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CAKES PIES SWEET ROLLS 
Our Specialty 

CHARLIE'S PIE SHOP 

CHURCHES — SOCIALS — PARTIES 

2203 North Cetral Ave. Phone 5-0371 

KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 



HAROLD'S 

KOSHER STYLE FOOD CENTER 

DELICATESSEN 
Home Cooked Foods — Choice Cold Meats 
131 South Gay St. Phone 3-5315 

KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 



ISLAND HOME MONUMENT CO. 

W. J. DIXON 

1400 Island Home Ave. Phone 5-5517 

Knoxville, Tennessee 



iillllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllPJj 

| Season's Greetings | 

= from I 

1 The Knoxville Journal I 

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NEW CHINA RESTAURANT 

Specializing in 
American and Chinese Dishes 
Enjoy the Atmosphere of Refinement 

Dial 5-5026 509 W. Church St. 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 




Louis M. Rabinowitz, right, noted New York industrialist, welocmes Israel 
ambassador Abba Eban to the "From the Land of the Bible" exhibition being 
presented by the American Fund for Israel Institutions at the Metropolitan 
Museum of Art, New York City 



their pocketbooks. He who would 
limit academic freedom is thus act- 
ing in the same manner as one who 
would have attempted to stop the 
study of physics with the conclu- 
sions of Galileo or the study of bi- 
ology with the observations of Aris- 
totle. . . . 

. . . Many of the "self-appointed 
thought police" who attack aca- 
demic freedom act entirely out of 
regard for their own economic in- 
terest. Many, however, have a gen- 



uine concern for the security of our 
nation in this time of international 
crisis. What such persons do not re- 
alize is that they, like their avowed 
enemies, work on the assumption 
that the democratic way of life 
really is inferior to, say, the Com- 
munist state. For only on such an 
assumption could free inquiry, free 
discussion, and complete knowledge 
of alternative ways of life be re- 
garded as a threat to our nation's 
security. . . . 




WASHINGTON (WNS)— Sixty- 
three members of Congress, includ- 
ing nineteen Senators, have notified 
th e U . S . Post Office Department of 
their support of a proposal for the 
issuance of a commemorative stamp 
next year to mark the 300th anni- 
versary of Jewish settlement in the 
United States. 



A village bearing the name of Max 
Bressler of Chicago, Zionist leader and 
national Chairman of the Israel Bonds 
Campaign of the Zionist Organization 
of America, to be known as Neve Mena- 
chem, after Mr. Bressler's Hebrew 
name, will be established in Israel on 
Jewish National Fund land at a cost of 
$100,000.00. 



BURLINGTON 

FLOWER SHOP 

Flowers of Distinction 
3436 Magnolia Ave. N.E. 
Phone 4-7819 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



Season's Greetings from 

Aluminum Home Products Company 

CARR ST. AT SOUTHERN RAILWAY PHONE 8-2459 
Knoxville, Tennessee 



BEATY CHEVROLET COMPANY 

"Your Chevrolet Dealer" 
Genuine CHEVROLET Parts and Service 
NEW and USED CARS and TRUCKS 

437 Broadway N.W. Phone 2-4183 

KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



113 



1953 Atlantic Rural Exposition 

(Concluded from Page 32) 



Tractor Contest, Aeroplane Contest 
and Parade of Prize Livestock. 

The Atlantic Rural Exposition is 
a non-profit Organization and has 
been designated the "Official State 
Fair of Virginia." A large part of 
the premium money offered exhibi- 
tors is supplied by the Common- 
wealth of Virginia. It is controlled 
by a board of Directors headed by 
Herbert B. Thomson of Forest, Va. 
as President and Dr. John R. Hutch- 
eson, Chancellor of VPI as Chair- 
man of the Agricultural Advisory 
Committee. Principal objectives of 
the Exposition are to encourage im- 
provement in Livestock and Agri- 
culture, to foster industry and to 



further the program of 4-1 1 and FFA 
and other Educational projects. 

About a hundred thousand tick- 
ets will be distributed to Virginia 
school children which will give them 
free admission to the Fairgrounds 
on designated days. FFA and 4-H 
members are also given free admis- 
sion on certain days. 

There will be much to see at the 
1953 Atlantic Rural Exposition. 
There will be fun for voung and 
old and educational features you 
can't afford to miss so make a ring 
around these dates and be in Rich- 
mond — September 25 — October 3 
—It will be STATE FAIR TIME. 



CHAPLAIN SAMUEL SOBEL, 
GETS PURPLE HEART AND 
BRONZE STAR 

Chaplain Samuel Sobel, formerly 
of Camp Lejeune, Jewish Chaplain 
with the First Marine Division in 
Korea, has been slightly wounded 
by enemy fire and has been awarded 
the Purple Heart Medal. Chaplain 
Sobel was hit by shrapnel in the 
battle of Vegas on March 29th. 

Simultaneously, word was re- 
ceived that Chaplain Sobel has al- 
so been awarded the Bronze Star 
Medal, for valor and "for meritori- 
ous achievements in connection 
with operations against the enemy." 

"As the only chaplain of the 
Jewish faith in the Division," the 
citation accompanying the award 
notes, "Chaplain Sobel, without re- 
gard for his personal safety, made 
frequent trips to the front lines and 
spent many days and nights with 
the men under heavy artillery and 
mortar fire in order to bring them 
the strength and consolation of 
their faith. Disregarding his person- 
al safety, Chaplain Sobel ministered 
to the spiritual needs of the wound- 
ed and dying, at the front lines, for 
ward aid stations and medical com 
panies of the division." 



"The Juggler" 

(Concluded from Page 50) 
of Galilee where the company 

stayed. The large number of Ger- 
man immigrees remembered the ac- 
tor from pre-Hitler days, when he 
was top favorite of the German and 
Viennese stage and screen. The de- 
mand to see him in person was so 
great that he staged concerts in the 
small town of Nahariva and in 
Haifa, at which he sang the songs 
he had made famous in German 
musicals and pictures. 

Douglas wound up his stay in 
Israel by accepting a gold medal 
from Israel's only film magazine, 
Kolnoa; a poll of its readers had 
placed him as their Number One 
star of the year. The greatest thrill 
the star of "The Juggler" experi- 
enced, however, was during his last 
day in Israel, when he met Prime 
Minister Ben Gurion in the latter's 
offices in Jerusalem. Paul Stewart, 
Karlweis and Director Dmytryk ac- 
companied Douglas on his meeting 
with the Prime Minister. 

On their return to Hollywood, 

J 7 

the troupe was enthusiastic about 
the courage, optimism and forward- 
looking enterprise of the people of 
the great new country of Israel. 



AUTOMATIC 

HEATING and EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

Distributors for York Refrigeration 
400 E. Depot Ave. Phone 5-2126 

KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 



New Year's Greetings 



Modernday Furniture Company 

"Fashions in Furniture" 

5404 Kingston Pike, N.W. 
KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 



Seasons Greetings from 

PARK NATIONAL BANK 

THREE OFFICES TO SERVE YOU 
Knoxville, Tennessee 



REGAS RESTAURANT 

Knoxville" s Oldest and Finest 

HOME OF SIZZLING STEAKS 

Corner Gay and Magnolia Sts. 
KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 



RODGERS & COMPANY, Inc. 

The Oldest Automobile Dealer in the South 

CADILLAC PONTIAC 

Cor. Main and Henley Phone 5-0322 

KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 



D. M. ROSE and CO. 

Since 1876 

TIMBERS - LUMBER - MILL WORK 

PHONE 3-0711 

Rose Place Knoxville, Tenn. 



SOUTHEASTERN 

411 HENLEY STREET KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

MIRRORS — AUTO GLASS 
Call 3-5113 for GLASS 

Kawneer Store Fronts - Aluminum Doors 

Distributor of Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass 

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i i 
I Season's Greetings from your 

J Zenith Television Headquarters \ 

« East Tennessee Electric, Inc. j 

1 316 W. Church St. Phone 5-9531 j 

I KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE \ 

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FIREPROOF STORAGE and VAN CO. ( 

Moving — Storage — Household Goods I 
MODERN FIREPROOF BUILDING 
201-21 I Randolph Phone 2-1 151 

KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 



FRENCH BROAD DAIRY 

Grade "A" Pasteurized 

Milk and Ice Cream 

R. F. D. No. 8 Phone 4-1651 

Serving KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 



114 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



NEW YEAR GREETINGS 

The advertisers listed herewith extend to their friends 
and patrons their most sincere holiday greetings, with 
all good wishes for a New Year of Peace, Happiness and 
Prosperity. 



A Page 

The Great A & P Tea Co 66 

Alderman Photo Co 59 

Alexander Machine Co 47 

American Enka Corp 49 

American & Efird Mills 58 

American Oil Co 17 

Aetna Shirt Corp 17 

Appalachian Mills Co 50 

Ashe Hosiery Mills 38 

Athens Table Co. . 27 

Atlantic Rural Exposition 4 

Auman Hosiery Co 39 

B 

B & W Frame Works 59 

B & W Upholsterin, Inc 28 

P. M. Barger Lumber Co 32 

Barkley Machine Works 48 

Basic Witz Furniture Co 21 

C. F. Bauer 4 

Nelly Bee Products 38 

Bellcraft Mfg. Co 68 

The Berkline Corporation 35 

Bernhardt Furniture Co 27 

Walter J. Bernstein 55 

Berry & Decker Transfer 31 

Biltwell Chair & Furniture Co., Inc 29 

Black Diamond Trailer Co 18 

Bladenboro Cotton Mills 60 

Blowing Rock Furniture Co. . 29 

Blue Gem Mfg. Co 57 

Blue Ridge Hardware & Supply Co., & 

Virginia Machine Tool Co 65 

Blue Ridge Transfer 20 

Bourne-Jones Motor Co 4 

H. L. Bowers Co., Inc 64 

Bradley Flyer & Repair Co 48 

Brady Furniture Co., Inc 28 

J. M. Brantley, Cotton 54 

Browning Belting and Supply Co 60 

Brown Mfg. Co 59 

Brown's Hosiery Mills, Inc 37 

Bryant Electric Repair Co 42 

Buckingham Virginia Slate Corp 13 

Builtright Chair Co 30 

Burkart Schier Chemical Co 31 

Burkyarns, Inc 49 

Burlington Mills 50 

Burris Mfg. Co 31 

Burlington Truckers, Inc 41 

Bush Transfer, Inc 53 

C 

C & P Telephone Co 14 

Calypso Veneer Co 29 

Camel Mfg. Co 45 

Camp Mfg. Co 23 

Carol-May Finishing Co 36 

Carolina Container Co 44 

Carolina Freight Carriers Corp 66 

Carolina Power & Light Co 66 

Carolina Steel & Iron Co 54 

Carroll Hosiery Co 20 

A. B. Carter. Inc 42 

Chadbourn Veneer Co 32 

Chatham Mfg. Co 3 

Clark Trailer & Equipment Co., Inc. ... 63 

Coca-Cola Bottling Co 43 

Cochrane Furniture Co 26 

Cocker Machine & Foundry Co 12 

Colonial Stores 56 

Commerce Mfg. Co 68 

Commercial Carving Co 28 

The Continental Furniture Co 26 

Copland Converting & Finishing Co 49 

Cotton Mill Machinery Co., Inc 62 

Cross Cotton Mills 61 

Craig & Buchanan Loom Reed Co 55 

D 

Dallas Hosiery Mills, Inc 37 

Davis Hosiery Corp 39 

Diamond Hosiery Corp . . . 39 

Dichman, Wright & Pugh .... 24 

Henry V. Dick & Co., Inc \ 62 

Dixie Container Corp 14 

Dura-Tred Hosiery Co 37 

Durham Container Co 66 

E 

Empire Furniture Corp 33 

Empire Mfg. Co 68 

Erlanger Mills 61 

Evans Mfg. Co 69 

Excel Textile Supply Co 59 

F 

Max Feldstein & Sons 17 

Fidelity Hosiery Mills \ 41 

Fogle Furniture Co 30 

Fredrickson Motor Express Corp 65 

Full-Knit Hosiery Mills, Inc. ... - 41 
G 

Gaston County Dyeing Machine Co 46 

Gaston Electric Co., Inc 42 

Gastonia Belting & Supply Co 48 

Gastonia Combed Yarn . . . outside back cover 

Gastonia Textile Sheet Metal Co. ... 46 

Gibbs Machine Co 53 

Goldston Motor Express . . 44 

Gossett Machine Works ] \ 48 

Graham Hosiery Mills, Inc . . . 41 

Grandview Hosiery Co 38 

Green River Mills " 48 

Greensboro News-Record 52 

Greensboro Loom Reed Co . . 55 

Greyhound Lines 102 

Griggs Trucking Co 64 

Gunther Brewing Co 17 

¥ , H 

Halifax County Hosiery Mills 37 

Hardware Distributors, Inc 50 

Harris Express, Inc 63 

Harris Marshall Hosiery Co 20 

Hartsville Cotton Mills 61 

Hartwell Garment Co 69 

Henredon Furniture Industries, Inc. . . . . 28 

Herman-Sipe & Co., Inc 32 



Page 

Hias 20 

Hickory Chair Co 34 

Hickory Paper Box Co 41 

High Point Bending & Chair Co 30 

High Point, Thomasville & Denton R. R. . . 18 

Hildebran Hosiery Mills 40 

Holder Bros. Mfg. Co 31 

Home Beneficial Life Insurance 

Co inside back cover 

Howell Mfg. Co 59 

B. F. Huntley Furniture Co 27 

Hy-Lan Furniture Co 34 

I 

Ideal Chair Co 33 

Industrial Piping Supply Co 64 

Ivey Weavers, Inc 57 

J 

J. F. G. Coffee Co 62 

W. G. Jarrell Machine Co 65 

Jenkins Metal Shops, Inc 43 

Johnson's Spring Co., Inc 27 

Frank Jones 23 

K 

Kendrick Brick & Tile Co 63 

Kester Machinery Co 62 

Kiddie Klothes Kompany 16 

Kincaid Furniture Co 34 

King Veneer Co 34 

Kings Mountain Foundry 47 

Klopman Mills 54 

Koury Hosiery Co 37 

L 

LaFayette Cotton Mills 60 

Lance, Inc 63 

Laughlin Full Fashioned Hosiery Mills, Inc. 41 

Lenoir Mirror Co 32 

Lenoir Wood Finishing Co 35 

Lewis & Holmes Motor Freight Corp. ... 36 

Liberty Chair Co 26 

Liberty Hosiery Mills 39 

Lincolnton Cabinet Co 30 

Lindy Hosiery Mill 40 

Lorimer Hosiery Mills 40 

Lovable Brassiere Co 69 

Lumber Sales Corp 23 

M 

McLean Trucking Co 46 

McCormick & Co 25 

McSweeney & Sons 25 

acanal Textile Corp 61 

Marcus & Farber 17 

Marcus Loeb & Co., Inc 67 

Marietta Paint & Color Co 44 

Marsh Furniture Co 33 

Martinat Hosiery Mills 39 

Mathewes, Crews & Lucas, Inc 55 

Maxwell Royal Chair Co 34 

Medlin Hosiery Mills 38 

Milton Hosiery Co 40 

Mitcham & Co 42 

Mojud Co., Inc 36 

Monarch Elevator and Machine Co 51 

Monarch Hosiery Mills 40 

Moon Engineering Co 24 

Morgan Transportation 62 

Morgan Trucking Co 53 

Moss Hosiery Co 40 

Murray Oldsmobile inside back cover 

N 

N & W Industries inside back cover 

Nash Sprinkler Co 32 

Neisler Mills, Inc 57 

Norris Hosiery Mills 41 

Nunnally & McCrea Co 67 

Nu-Vogue Hosiery Mills, Inc 39 

O 

The Oakley Co 18 

Odell Mill Supply Co 54 

Orkin Exterminator Co 21 

P 

J. C. Paddock Co 3 

Park Yarn Mills 44 

Pet Ice Cream . 67 

Pickett Hosiery Mills, Inc 37 

Piedmont Fabrics 48 

Piedmont Iron Works 47 

Piedmont Mill Supply Co 47 

Piedmont Publishing Co 18 

Puritan Finishing Mills, Inc 57 

O 

Queen City Trailways 52 

R 

Ragan Knitting Co., Inc 40 

Ramseur Furniture Co 28 

Reliable Mfg. Co 33 

A. G. Rhodes & Son 67 

Rhyne-Houser Mfg. Co 57 

Ridgeview Hosiery Mill Co 40 

Robbins Knitting Mills 38 

Robbins Mills inside front cover 

Rockfish Mebane Yarn Mills, Inc 57 

S 

Schachner Leather & Belting Co 65 

W. H. Scott 22 

Sam Schwartz Machinery Corp 62 

Sellers Mfg. Co 58 

Service for Israel 9 

Seven Point Hosiery, Inc 41 

Shamrock Damask Mills 60 

Silver Knit Hosiery Mills, Inc 38 

Sir Walter Hotel 56 

A. M. Smyre Mfg. Co 48 

South Carolina Electric & Gas Co 64 

Southern Biscuit Co 4 

Southern Elevator Co 52 

Southern Life Insurance Co 55 

Southern Motor Express 47 

Southern Natural Gas Co 56 

Southern Paper Box Co 68 

Southern Radio Corp 63 

Southland Mfg. Co 44 

Southland Wood Products Co 54 

Spencer Machinery & Supply Co 43 



Page 

Spencer Mountain Mills 47 

Stout Chair Co 30 

Sykes Foundry & Machine Co., Inc 44 

T 

Thomasville Chair Co 29 

Thomasville Hosiery Mills, Inc 36 

Blackstone Hosiery Mills, Inc. 

Thomasville Upholstering Co 26 

Thompson-Arthur Paving Co 56 

Thurston Motor Lines 54 

Tiedright Tie Co 59 

Tomlinson Co., Inc 55 

Troutman Chair Co 34 

U 

United Jewish Appeal 35 

United Mills Corp 60 

V 

Vaughn & Co 22 

Vaughn Furniture Co 21 

Viking Sprinkler Co 56 

Virginia Electric & Power Co 15 

Virginia Ferry Corp 25 

P. H. Volk 16 

W 

Waldensian Bakeries 44 

Walnut Wood Carving Co. .... 32 

Weldon Mills, Inc inside back cover 



and services with the aid of their 
families receive long-term loans and 
training to enable them to establish 
such enterprises. No less than 2,000 
families have been rehabilitated by 
this project, while 500 handicapped 
workers, including more than a hun- 
dred blind, have now been found 
employment in twenty sheltered 
workshops. 

Thus, to thousands the past year 
has brought health, work, or a place 
for the evening of their lives. But to 
thousands of others it has meant 
marking time, waiting impatiently 
for their turn to come in the long 
list of those still awaiting treatment 
and services. Some 5,000 aged are 
still in immigrant camps; hundreds 




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Page 

Westboro Weaving Co 58 | 

West Point Foundry & Machine Co 69 

West Point Mfg. Co 8 1 

Williams & Brower, Inc 55 I 

Y ! 

York Mills 49 

Youngblood Truck Lines 65 | 

VIRGINIA 

Alexandria 97 I 

Charlottesville 106 | 

Danville 108-110 

Emporia 81 ' 

Fredericksburg 97 , 

Hampton 103 

Harrisonburg 107 ' 

Lynchburg 88-91 ( 

Newport News 98 

Norfolk 92-95 

Petersburg 104-105 

Portsmouth 96 

Richmond 71-80 

Roanoke 82-87 

Suffolk 96 

Waynesboro 107 I 

Williamsburg 10241 

TENNESSEE 
Knoxville 111-114 i 



of invalids need care and attention, I 
and 3,000 handicapped workers long I 
for the chance to become useful 
citizens. 

The new year offers hope for 
many of them. Malben is already 
constructing two large new homes 
for an additional 1,000 aged, which 
will bring the total number of old 
folk under Malben care to well over 
3,000. Another custodial care center 
is nearing completion, new work- 
shops are planned and under con- 
struction. 

To thousands throughout Israel, 
Rosh Hashonah 5714 thus begins a 
year which may bring them the se- 
curity and the happiness which have 
been denied them for so long. 



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Rosh Hashonah on the Hills of Ephraim 

(Concluded From Page 14") 





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Yom Kippur 5714 • October 1953 




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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



3 



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C. W. MOSELEY, Vice-Pres. B. NASH, Asst. Sec.-Treas. 



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4 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




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Purveyors of Fine Meats 
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Charleston, W. Va.— Phone 5-2156 
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Harrisonburg, Va. — Phone 1132 
Lynchburg, Va— Phone 2-5181 



Trenton, N. J.— Phone 57-611 



Elizabeth, N. J.— Phone 2-6481 
Winchester, Va.— Phone 4139 
New York, N. Y. — Courtland 7-6255 
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Volume XIX • OCTOBER, 1953 // N 



Number 2 



^ Times -Outlook 



EDITORIALS 



Chester A. Brown, Editor 



Judgment Day 

Tradition over the centuries has established Yom Kippur 
not only as a Day of Atonement but as Judgment Day. On 
this holy day we admit our short-comings, ask Divine for- 
giveness and pray that we may be inscribed in the Book of 
Life for a year of health and well-being. 

As we observe this solemn day, we wish for our friends 
and readers . . . for Jewry the world over . . . that they may 
enjoy in the year ahead nothing but the best that the fates 
may provide. We know that there is universal hope that 
the coming year may see the re-establishment of peace 
throughout the world, and that if we all could unite on 
one prayer it would be for the sense of security that would 
come with peace. 

May the year 5714 see our fondest hopes realized! 
Accept Graciously Our Petitions 

Guest Editorial By Rabbi Jerome Mark, Eormerly of Gastonia, N. C. 
Now of Lake Charles, Louisiana 

The oldest and most moving Litany of the Jewish 
prayer book is the one known as Ovinu, Malkenu — from its 
opening words, our Father, our King. Everything distinct- 
ly Jewish has a history and a tradition behind it. Needless 
to say, so has this prayer, recited facing the open ark. Some 
of its lines were written by the great martyr, Rabbi Akiba. 
who died more than 1800 years ago, convicted of the crime 
of teaching the Torah. The chief theme of the prayer is 
submission. It invokes the protection and the compassion 
of the Almighty. 

The introductory words, which are woven like a golden 
strand throughout the devotions, are significant. Our 
Father, our King. First, we plead no merit, we admit that 
we are sinful; yet God is compassionate. He will have 
mercy even as a father pitieth his children. So we say 
OVINU, our Father. But this does not leave us without 
obligations. We are not free to break the divine command- 
ments by which men must live. Even the most indulgent 
parent requires obedience and discipline. God is too pure 
of eyes to behold evil — certainly not in Israel, for that is 
the whole meaning of the term Chosen People. So we ap- 
proach with trembling the mercy seat of the Almighty and 
call in awe not only OVINU, our Father, but also MAL- 
KENU, Our King. In the days when these prayers were 
written the ideal king was regarded as the righteous law- 
giver and judge. Today, as Americans, protected by our 
free institutions, we can say even with more emphasis than 
ever before, We have no King but Thee. Thou art the 
Master of the Universe, our Lord and our King, our Re- 
deemer and our Savior. 

On this solemn fast day, Jews assemble for prayer — 
all Jews, on land and on sea, in freedom or under the yoke 
of oppression, those who are at peace and those in the throes 
of war. This universal and solemn service fills our hearts 
with contrition and our minds with awe. It is more than 
a figure of speech to say that this is the Yom Hadin, the 



Divine Judgment Day, so that we are overpowered by the 
knowledge of our weakness and become as helpless infants 
in the sight of the Almighty. On this judgment day our 
future becomes all the more inscrutable. 

It was the wise hand of Providence that has always held 
the future unpredictable. Otherwise neither science nor art 
would flourish; ambition would be stifled and inventive 
genius would be checked. What is left to us is to labor and 
to struggle; but we do not, as our daily prayer puts it, 
labor in vain nor bring forth for confusion. Along with 
our strivings we always have the soft musical accompani- 
ment of an indomitable hope. With a faith which was 
never dimmed by thousands of years of history, we return 
to pour out our hearts before the Eternal in rhythmic de- 
votion of song and prayer. And like a child overwhelmed 
by the sudden onrush of unfamiliar circumstances calls for 
its mother, so do we now call out in the dramatic words of 
that ancient prayer, 

Our Father, our King, accept graciously our petitions. 
With overcharged emotions we confess that we know 
not what to pray for. We want to lose ourselves in pure 
ecstasy, offer only adoration and thanksgiving, exultation 
and Hallellujahs. We want to subdue our reason and our 
many wants. But we are human. Life asserts itself; and 
life is sweet. And what is life without its blessings, with- 
out goodness and health and joy? So we pray to be in- 
scribed in the book of life, blessing, peace and sustenance. 

In the midst of it all, weakness overcomes us and we 
begin to wonder, What is prayer? Why pray? What shall 
we pray for? Have we a right to pray at all? To these 
doubts and searchings there is only one answer. Our pres- 
ent exalted feelings are too holy to be interrupted by ques- 
tions. This moment is too precious; it may not come again. 
No obstacles can now stand in the way. This is the time 
for prayer and prayer will leap over all barriers. 

There is justice in prayer even for material blessings. 
You may recall some of the quaint stories about the Hassi- 
dic Rebbes, those miracle working leaders of former Polish 
Jewish communities. The story I have in mind deals with 
one such a teacher. Bear in mind that Abraham and Job 
both challenged the Lord of the universe to conform His 
heavenly judgments to the sense of right and justice which 
He demands of us. Since those days, the Jew has always 
dared ask the God of righteousness to act righteously, to 
abide by the Law He set down. But God also, according 
to Jewish traditional belief, set down our ritual laws and 
He must therefore not transgress them. 

So it is told that in the city of Rodno there was the 
great Rabbi Itzikel, whose miracles were renowned far and 
wide. It happened on a Rosh Hashanah. It was Saturday. 
Just before the great sanctification the rabbi took his stand 
in the pulpit and publicly announced that this was the day 
when God wrote down in His great book of Memory man's 
fate for the coming year, whether for life or for death, for 
trouble or serenity. But, continued the advocate on behalf 

(Please Turn To Page 26) 



The American Jewish Times-Outlook, published monthly at 604 Southeastern Building, Greensboro, N. C. Richmond Office, Broad-Grace Arcade, Richmond, Va. Ches- 
ter a Brown, Editor; David Bernstein, Business Manager; Nathan Kessler, Advertising and Business Manager, Richmond Office; Florence Byers, Virginia News Editor, P. O. 
Box 701, Richmond, Va.; P. O. Box 1087, Greensboro, N. C. Member Seven Arts Feature Syndicate, Inc. $2.00 per year payable in advance. Entered as Second-Class Mat- 
ter at the Post Office at Greensboro, N. C, under Act of March 3, 1879. The views expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the publishers, but may be published in 
the interest of freedom of the press. The American Jewish Times Outlook is owned and edited solely as an independent enterprise and is not a Jewish community undertaking. 



6 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




A Jewish Platform 
of Goodwill 



By DR. MAURICE N. EISENDRATH, President 
Union of American Hebrew Congregations 

The following statement is one of three prepared under the auspices of the 
National Conference of Christians and Jews. It is part of a plan to have each 
of the three principal religious faiths express their religious traditions. The 
Conference has selected the TIMES-OUTLOOK to present Dr. Eisendrath's 
commentary preliminary to its being published in pamphlet form. — THE 
EDITOR. 



DR. MAURICE N. EISENDRATH 



The Greeks had a word for it; so, 
at least, they say. Just what that 
particular famous word may have 
been may no longer be precisely 
known. But one can be fairly cer- 
tain that it has some relationship 
with the charm of gracious living, 
with aesthetics; yes, even with the 
holiness of beauty. 
The Romans too undoubtedly had 
a word for it — that is, a word for 
the suinmum bonum, the loftiest 
aspiration of life. Though, once 
again, "let mot juste," the exact 
word, may be forgotten, it is quite 
clear from whatever knowledge we 
possess of the Roman way of life 
that the generic word for their par- 
ticular way of life had some rela- 
tionship with the ordered procedure 
of daily living, for Law with a capi- 
tal "L.~" 

The Hebrews, likewise, had a 
word for it and, in a way, though 
it must have been coined long be- 
fore Greek and Roman came upon 
the stage of history, it had some re- 
lationship to both Beauty and Law. 
beauty, an especial brand of law; 
it was the Beauty of Holiness and 
of the Spiritual and Moral Law. It 
was the Beauty created not so much 
by man but which prompted man 
to behold the "heavens which Thou 
has created, the moon and the stars, 
the earth and all that is thereon." 
It was a Law that was created not 
by Roman Senators or Consuls, but 
derived from the Word of the Lord 
Himself, absolute, eternal, immut- 
able. The word, then, that the He- 
brews had for their noblest concept 
for human living was Torah, which, 
although it is frequently translated 
merely as Law, connotes something 
far deeper, broader, more all-inclu- 
sive than mere civil or domestic le- 
gal regulations. It denotes the very 
essence of man's relationship with 
God and with fellowmen as well. 



But, while the early rabbis me- 
ticulously counted every conceiv- 
able regulation contained in the 
Hebrew Torah, the five books of 
Moses, and calculated that the sum 
of those laws was six hundred and 
thirteen commandments, several of 
the early sages already recognized 
that there was an ascending, or de- 
scending, scale of values reflected 
even in the "Torah m'Sinai," the 
Law revealed at Sinai. And so they 
vie with one another in striving to 
reduce those myriads of statutes to 
but a few that would subsume them 
all. This one reduced them to six, 
another to five, and still another to 
four. The Talmud itself (and no 
tome of law was ever considered 
more binding upon the traditional 
and observant Jew ) reduced them 
to two: "This is the book of the 
generations of man" and "Love thy 
neighbor as thyself." The first ut- 
terance signified that the Torah, 
the Books of Moses, the Supreme 
and Sublime and Sacred revelation 
entrusted to Israel, was intended 
not for Israel alone but for all the 
children of men. Hence: "This is 
the book of the generations of 
men" — all of them for all time to 
come. And the one most luminous, 
incandescent commandment in- 
cumbent upon all such generations 
of men to obey is the single edict: 
"Love thy neighbor as thyself." 

To be sure there have been some, 
few in number, who, even within 
the ranks of Jewry, may from time 
to time have interpreted or, rather, 
misinterpreted narrowly and pro- 
vincially that majestic summons to 
an all-inclusive love of one's fellow- 
men. Especially at times of bitter 
persecution and, perhaps, too zeal- 
ous preselytism, when, with threats 
as well as bribes, there were those 
who sought to "draw in the hem of 
the garment" and to "build a fence 



around the Torah" lest any stranger 
should trample and desecrate the 
"courts of the Lord." Even to this 
day there are undoubtedly some 
who, smarting at the memory of 
centuries of nightmarish incarcera- 
tion in ghettos and more recently in 
barbed-wire concentration camps, 
fight shy of movements of good 
will and remain aloof from such de- 
sirable efforts to build human 
brotherhood as the National Con- 
ference of Christians and Jews. For 
some of these the vivid recollection 
of Pogrom and yellow badge, of 
ritual murder and mass cremations, 
may seem still too recent to permit 
them to "love all one's neighbors as 
one's self" 

These few arc not true to their 
Torah, are not obedient to the Jew- 
ish Moral Law. Though their mo- 
tivation may be understood, though 
a sympathetic understanding of the 
valley of the shadow through which 
their people and sometimes their 
very selves have passed cannot be 
overlooked, nevertheless their herit- 
age as Jews precludes any such se- 
clusive reaction even to the bitter- 
est of tormenting experience. 

For the word which the Hebrews 
have had for it, being the word not 
of men but of God, is not predi- 
cated upon human experience or 
exigency but upon divine demand. 



It is not based upon expediency as 
is much of our contemporary con- 
duct. "You be a nice compliant lit- 
tle nation : you Greeks, or Dutch, or 
Belgians, or French, and we solici- 
tous and generous Americans will 
see to it that you don't actually 
starve. You do as we say and help 
us maintain the status quo and we 
will grant you abundant aid." One 
wonders how much of this aid 
would be forthcoming if we were 
not tremblingly afraid of the enemy 
crouching at the gate. So, too, there 
may be those within the household 
of Israel who wonder whether their 
own gestures of fellowship may be 
requited, whether their participa- 
tion in such an adventure in mutual 
understanding and intergroup edu- 
cation as the National Conference 
of Christians and Jews evokes a suf- 
ficient response on the part of oth- 
ers. But such a spirit of expediency 
and pragmatism is not the basis for 
Jewish activity in this particular 
realm. "Thou shalt love thy neigh- 
bor as thyself" is not a temporary, 
or temporizing command posited 
upon reciprocal good will. Nor is it 
negated nor abrogated even by the 
most contradictory conduct of oth- 
ers. It is a divine behest, unquali- 
fied, unlimited, universally inclu- 



sive. 



(Please Turn To Page 94) 



THE COVER 

Chaplain Samuel Sobel, whose picture appears on the front cover, 
was recently stationed at Camp Lejeune, N. C. He was with the First 
Marine Division in Korea, and was awarded the Purple Heart Medal 
and the Bronze Star Medal for Wounds he had received from enemy 
fire. The citation accompanying the Bronze Star Medal award said: 

". . . . As the only chaplain of the Jewish faith in the Division, 
Chaplain Sobel, without regard for his personal safety, made frequent 
trips to the front lines and spent many days and nights with the men 
under heavy artillery and mortar fire in order to bring to them the 
strength and consolation of their faith. . . " 



s 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




Judean Destiny 



HARRY E. WEDECK 

Immanuel the Radanite sat in his 
office. The wan winter afternoon 
was drawing to a close. From sea- 
ward gusty winds came sweeping 
over Marseille, into the crevices of 
the stone counting-house, into the 
chilled heart of Immanuel the Rad- 
anite. 

A step sounded, and Master Guil- 
bcrt, the overseer of the scriveners, 
who supervised the outgoing of bales 
of goods and checked the cargoes 
from Venice and Byzantium, whis- 
pered: "It is growing dark, Don 
Immanuel. Shall I bring the 
candles?" 

Immanuel did not answer. He 
sat crouched over his desk, his 
gabardine hunched over his should- 
ers. Only the graying whisps of his 
beard stuck out into the gloom. 

"Master," Gilbert urged, more 
loudly. 

The merchant raised his head 
slowly. His eyes looked straight 
ahead. 

"What is it, Gilbert?" 

"It is getting dark, Master." 

"Darkness is my lot now." 

"Yes, but the mistress has passed 
away these two months now. It is 
not time to recover yourself and set 
to vour work?" 

"My work is done, Guilbert." 
This time the Radanite merchant 
raised his eyes, and Guilbert saw 
their bloodshot look, as though, hav- 
ing shed all their tears, they were 
now drained dry. 

"There is still work, Don Im- 
manuel. The inventory will soon 
be made. And when the sailing 
season begins we shall be busy. They 
say — and I have heard the captain- 
masters at the wharves confirm it — 
they say that Basil, whom they call 
the Macedonian, intends to ease the 
restrictions of exporting the purple 
cloth from New Rome." 

Immanuel the Radanite's body 
stiffened, as if with interest. "Non- 
sense, Guilbert. I know the Em- 



By HARRY E. WEDECK 



peror. He is tyrannical in the matter 
of his Byzantine cloth. No, Guil- 
bert, do not tempt me with words 
and gossip. Since my Zipporah 
passed away, what is there for me 
to do? More trade? Shall I import 
more spices from Aleppo and 
Kairouan? Shall I seek supplies of 
pikes and jerkins for the soldiery of 
the Frankish provinces? Or more 
hippocras for the wineshops? More 
furs from the Northern frontiers? 
No, Guilbert." He shook his head. 

"You may have all that. My time 
is done." 

"What do you mean, Don Im- 
manuel?" There was personal 
anxiety in the overseer's tone. 

"I mean, Guilbert," the Radanite 
spoke with slow deliberation now," 
that it is time for me, after almost 
forty years of trading, to call a halt. 
I shall send for one of my younger 
nephews — from Troyes or Valence, 
or maybe from my wife's city of 
Treves. Let them continue this 
business. I have enough means; and 
I shall go my way." 

Guilbert had been long enough 
with the Radanite to be informal. 

"What do you intend then, Don 
Immanuel?" 

"I shall go to the Holy Land, 
Guilbert. There I shall find rest 
for my spirit until my own time 
comes. I shall be able to studv a 
little also." 

He stopped speaking. When he 
stood up, to regard Guilbert, his 
face was assured. His decision was 
made. He swung from his chair 
and as he strode out of his office 
into the counting-house, his high 
red leather boots sounding on the 
stones, he appeared, to Guilbert, a 
vision of a Roman senator. 

There was direct entrance, 
through a narrow stone passage, into 
the large counting-house. There, 
glimmering candles and rush lights 
lit up the place, but fitfully. Fan- 
tastic shadows danced over the 
walls and beamed ceilings. 



The scriveners, in their leader 
doublets and long woolen hose, were 
busy. Some crouched over a long 
table, copying lists, their quills 
screeching. Others were moving 
around the large chamber, examin- 
ing goods, disappearing into cellars, 
discussing a cargo. 

Immanuel stood, watching. His 
eyes ran over the wood-empanelled 
walls, lined with shelves. He glanced 
at the small samplings of cardamon 
and cumin, frankincense and eryngo, 
sweet marjoram for flavoring meats, 
nutmeg and mullein. He observed, 
on the vellum inset on the wall, the 
date — Wednesday, in the third 
month of the second year in the 
reign of Charles. 

For a moment, he watched the 
scene as if he were a spectator. This 
is mine, yet not mine. All the 
samplings of ambergris and the jade 
from the Indian regions, the piles 
of papyrus, the huge yellowing folio 
were the symbols of his life work. 
The spices, releasing their essence, 
made an enticing, cool aroma. 

Immanuel breathed in the frag- 
rance. 

A young scrivener passed. 

"Good day, Master," he greeted. 

"You like your work, Osbert?" 

"Yes, Master. Some day I hope 
to become an agent — maybe in the 
Greek islands, or in Bvzantium." 

"You may, Osbert, sooner than 
you think." 

Immanuel watched the scriveners 
close their work for the day and 
leave, each to his own home, or 
room — in a waterfront hut, or 
among the fishermen, or in a nearby 
inn. They were his, all these men: 
porters, warehousemen, scriveners, 
captains of galleasses, agents scat- 
tered along the entire coast. A vast 
organization, in which seamen and 
clerks had their assigned roles: 
agents in the East, Jewish lacemak- 
ers in the Greek Islands, fur traders 
and spice carriers. He, Immanuel, 



had been for years the focal point 
of all this activity, distributing 
necessities and articles of luxury to 
ducal castles, royal courts, to armies 
and prelates and emperors. 

The old porter shuffled forward, 
interrupting his sequence of 
thought. 

"Some more pilgrims, Master." ' 

"Let them be fed then, Benedict, 
and sheltered. Take them along." 

"But one is very old, and he says 
he would like to speak with you." 

The Radanite went out with 
Benedict. In a thick-walled portico 
attached to the rear of the house 
stood a cluster of men, lean hungry 
monks, begrimed travelers in an 
assortment of outlandish costumes, 
bleary old creatures. Among them 
stood a small, dark-bearded man, 
who came forward on recognizing 
Immanuel. 

"Don Immanuel! Shalom!" 

"To you too be peace, Rabbi 
Ephraim! What brings you here in 
this season? Come inside. It is 
cold here." 

While Benedict directed the oth- 
ers to a little stone-walled room, 
fitted with cubicles for guests, Im- 
manuel conducted the Rabbi inside 
the house. 

"You will have dinner with me, 
Rabbi, and you will stay. Stay as 
long as you may. I am alone." And 
the merchant spoke of his recent 
loss of his wife and his own resolve. 

After dinner, the talk was con- 
tinued. 

"I want to thank you, Don Im- 
manuel. Your contributions will 
help our community more than we 
could expect." 

"I too have more than I need. 
That is why I have resolved on the 
Holy Land." 

"A wise decision. Conditions are 
becoming terrifying once again. The 
pirates are busy, we are told; and 
you probably know more than we 

(Please Turn To Page 87) 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



9 



Dr. Samuel Newman... 

Trail Blazer in Medicine and 
New Techniques of Pediatrics 

By GERALD TETLEY 



Reprinted with Copyright permission of Virginia and Virginia County Magazine 




"Your child has pneumonia but 
do not worry; I shall do my best to 
get her well." 

This is a frequent statement in 
the life of Dr. Samuel Newman, 
Danville pediatrician, humanist, phi- 
losopher, and lecturer, who at the 
age of 62 is still blazing new trails 
in medicine and is applying new 
techniques and displaying that sixth 
sense which makes the diagnosis of 
children's ailments possible under 
trying conditions. 

The physician's friends often won- 
der how he manages to function as 
a human dynamo; attending to 
practice, lecturing, writing, and 
promoting Zionism, and various 
liberal and cultural endeavors. 

In Mrs. Ida Greenberg Newman, 
Dr. Newman has found a wife with 
a deep sympathy for his labors and 
true helpmate in the far-flung activi- 
ties. 

When Dr. Newman arrived in 
Danville in the summer of 1923 
and announced his intention to 
limit his practice to diseases of in- 
fants and children, his medical col- 
leagues were skeptical; they thought 
tha the would not take root at a 
time when specialization was just 
emerging and when pediatrics was 
almost an unknown field in this 
area. Dr. Newman was determined 
to apply new techniques. Armed 
with a training which he received 
at the great medical centers and at 
the famous Children's Clinic of the 
Universitv of Vienna under the 
great von Pirquet and Bela Schick 
he chose the lot of the pioneer . 

It soon became apparent that Dr. 
Newman made no mistake in the 
choice of a location. Physicians in 
Danville and the surrounding com- 
munities recognized his ability and 
referred problem cases to him. The 
Danville Health Department organ- 
ized under Dr. Newman's guidance 
a children's clinic which has been 
regarded as one of the best in the 



state. The Junior Wednesday Club 
of Danville, anxious to engage in a 
constructive humanitarian task, or- 
ganized a children's clinic for Pitts- 
svlvania County to serve without 
distinction of race, creed or color. 
For nearly a quarter of a century 
Dr. Newman has given much of his 
time to this clinic. A similar task 
was undertaken by the Charity 
League of Martinsville under the 
directorship of Newman 20-odd 
years ago. At each of these clinics 
the rooms arc filled with infants 
and children, white and colored. 
Assisted by a staff of nurses, volun- 
teer workers and secretaries, detailed 
directions for the care of patients 
arc given. The rudiments of hy- 
giene, dietetics and nursing care are 
patiently taught. The maxim of 
"water, externally, internally and 
eternally" is vigorously expounded 
by Dr. Newman and his aides. 

The field of pediatrics is naturally 
vast. To many phases of this spe- 
cialty Dr. Newman made significant 
contributions. He was the first to 
give a blood transfusion to a child 
in this state, using the difficult di- 
rect method then in vogue. He was 
the first to establish a blood bank 
in his office where transfusions 
could be administered any time of 
the day and night in an emergency. 
He pioneered in intravenous ther- 
apy, so vital in the modern care 
of infants and children in anv se- 
rious illness. He still exhibits the 
pyrex apparatus in his office which 
he used to prepare the intravenous 
solutions years before thev became 
commercially available. He was also 
the first to introduce the method of 
treating infants dangerously ill with 
whooping cough with injection of 
ether in the muscle. 

Dr. Newman was born in War- 
saw, Poland, and received there his 
primary and secondary education. 
Warsaw during that period was a 
battleground of two cultures, Ro- 



man-Western and Byzantine-East- 
ern. The heavv hand of Czarist op- 
pression lay most heavily on the 
Jews of Russia and Poland who nat- 
urally supported the revolutionary 
and liberal movements which la- 
bored for the downfall of Russian 
absolutism. Many Jewish youths 
looked to the United States of 
America as the land of freedom and 
golden opportunity. At the age of 
19 young Newman turned up in 
(Little) Washington, N. C, where 
two of his uncles were old and pros- 
perous settlers. 

Asked whether he experienced 
any difficulty in adjusting himself to 
American life, Dr. Newman replied, 
"The Universitv of North Carolina 
made the process easv. North Caro- 
lina was emerging from the post- 
Civil War lethargy and was looking 
forward to a dynamic and progres- 



DR. SAMUEL NEWMAN 

sive unfolding of its material and 
spiritual energies. The campus was 
seething with new ideas and intel- 
lectual curiosity. I was readily 
drawn into the currents of univer- 
versity life and experienced the re- 
freshing influence of the famous 
galaxy of professors, the exponents 
of liberalism and the New South — 
Horace Williams, Dr. MacNider. 
Parson Moss and the famous Gra- 
hams. The prevailing religious at- 
mosphere at the University of 
North Carolina was that of liberal 
Protestantism, with a strong em- 
phasis on the social message of 
Christianity. To me it was an as- 
pect of prophetic Judaism in its no- 
blest expression. It was natural for 
me to participate in the YMCA ac- 
tivities and I was encouraged to en- 
ter literary contests." 

During his first two years a! the 




(Photo by Hitchcock Studios, Danville) 

Dr. Samuel Newman, his wife, the former Ida Greenberg, and 
their grandson, Jay Macht of Hagerstown, Maryland. The boy is 
a son of Naomi Newman whose portrait in oils forms a back- 
ground to the family group. 



10 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




(Photo by Hitchcock Studios) 

Under this roof he most of the interests of Dr. Samuel Newman, for it is his home and his 
small hospital where he functions as a pediatrician. It is one of Danville's oldest Georgian 

houses with noble lines. 




"Won't he ever call?" 

Stop biting your nails, your boy friend may be trying to get you now! Of 
course, if someone forgot to replace the receiver after a call, your telephone 
and all others on the party line are out of service. When you hang up after 
each call, be sure that your receiver is not caught on a book or other object. 
A little care pays off in better service for you and your party-line neighbors. 
The Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Company of Virginia. 



University young Newman had w on 
the Short Story Prize, the Hunter 
Lee Harris Gold Medal for literary 
excellence, and was elected to Sigma 
Upsilon, the national honorary lit- 
erary fraternity. His attention was 
also directed to the promotion of 
Hebrew culture as a contribution to 
the wider life of the University. 

Dr. Newman pursued his medical 
studies at the University of Virginia. 
He also found the time and engerv 
to engage in extra-curricular activi- 
ties. He addressed many student 
meetings at Madison Hall, that 
great forum where many new ideas 
have been expounded. He entered 
the Medical Corps of the United 
States Army. 

After completion of his serv ice in 
the Army he served internshps in 
New York and on the basis of com- 
petitive examinations was appointed 
Medical Commissioner for Congress 
Poland of the American Joint Dis- 
tribution Committee. In this work 
he came in contact with the tragic 
legacy of disease among millions 
of children which the war years left 
in Europe. Before returning to 
Danville Dr. Newman spent an ad- 
ditional year in the famous Chil- 
dren's Clinic of the University of 
Vienna. A thesis of his was accepted 
for publication by the University of 
Vienna. 

In June Dr. Newman will have 
completed 30-odd years of uninter- 
rupted pediatric practice in Dan- 
ville. He still carries the burdens of 
practice with zest and vigor and 
maintains a keen interest in v arious 
civic, cultural and religious endeav- 
ors. He revived Congregation Beth 
Sholem; he founded the B'nai B'rith 
Lodge in Danv ille and the Danville 
Zionist District. Through the many 
years he has been an active ex- 
ponent and leader of the Zionist 
movement in this section of the 
country. At present he is State 
Chairman of Bonds for Israel. In 
an interview the busy physician thus 
formulated briefly his philosophy of 
Zionism: 

"The facts of American life point 
to the dev elopment of a unitary cul- 
ture, to which all ethnic and cul- 



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tural groups of our population will 
contribute. But Jews all over the 
world cherish a mystic belief in a 
destiny for the Jewish people on 
the ancient soil of Palestine where 
the Jewish genius can find full ex- 
pression. Theirs will be a most sym- 
pathetic relationship to the State of 
Israel; they will help build up its 
economic life and its cultural and 
scientific institutions. But in the 
realm of citizenship and politics the 
loyalty and undivided allegiance of 
American Jews belongs to America 
and to America alone." 

Incidentally, our own Virginia 
statesmen have evinced a sympa- 
thetic interest in Zionism. The 
Proclamation by Governor Tuck on 
the day of the establishment of the 
State of Israel, May 14, 1948, will 
rank as a great humanitarian and 
political document. Senator Byrd 
on many occasions lent a helping 
hand to the Zionist movement. 

Dr. Newman is a Democrat but 
he does not inject himself into poli- 
tics in the ordinary sense. He has a 
high concept of the role of America 
as the leader of the free world and 
as the repository and guardian of the 
ideals of western civilization. Touch- 
ing the subject of religion Dr. New- 
man stated, "I have been keenly in- 
terested in theological and moral 
problems. I would designate mvself 
a religious humanist, a term which 
describes those modem theologians 
who insist first of all on human 
values, of man's capability of work- 
ing out his salvation with his God 
but all within the framework of su- 
pernaturalistic philosophy." 

The Newman menage is interest- 
ing. Years ago he acquired one of 
Danville's finest and oldest colonial 
homes. One part is used for living 
quarters, containing a large library 
'objets d'art and main paintings by- 
Otto Merschel, a noted Viennese 
painter. Another part contains spa- 
cious offices, two x-rav machines, a 
well-equipped laboratory and treat- 
ment rooms. An entire lower floor 
is used for the Junior Wednesday 
Club Clinic. 

Asked what he regarded as the 
richest reward for his manifold la- 
bors, Dr. Newman replied: "My 
richest and most cherished reward 
was the opportunity to acquire an 
understanding and lover of Ameri- 
can life and civilization through 
Southern channels; the opportunity 
and privilege to minister to human 
ailments and needs; and the rearing 
of children and grandchildren under 
the free skies of this glorious Re- 
public." 





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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




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A RABBI'S DILEMMA 

By RABBI ABRAHAM HEFTERMAN 



The Jewish community was quite 
pleased with its new synagogue 
president, a comparative newcomer 
to the town. He was a man of 
wealth with an open hand and an 
active participant in all facets of 
Jewish affairs. 

His wife was a quiet, soft-spoken 
woman who maintained a kosher 
home and raised her children in a 
spirit of Jewishness. In feminine 
circles, however, it was bruited 
about that she was Christian, 
though the rumor mongers seemed 
to have no basis other than sus- 
picion on which to pin their tongue 
wagging. The rabbi, of recent as- 
sociation with the community, too 
had heard the rumor. In fact he 
was himself suspicious of the 
woman, but every time he thought 
of it he dismissed the idea as pure 
conjecture. In time, however, the 
matter began weighing heavily on 
his mind, particularly when he dis- 
covered that his nephew, whom he 
introduced to the president's daugh- 
ter, was in serious correspondence 
with the young lady. 

The rabbi was now possessed by 
fear of a possible romance and even- 



tual marriage. Was he to ignore 
the development? But how could 
he? How could he, a rabbi and 
teacher in Israel, permit one of his 
kin to carry a Christian? Jewish law 
on this point is quite clear — a child's 
faith is determined by maternal 
origin. And should the rumors 
about the president's wife be true, 
how could he look on in silence 
upon a transgression, particularly in 
his own family, of the most basic 
and most sacred law of the Jewish 
faith? But, on the other hand, 
how could he make a commotion 
when there was no concrete proof 
that the president's wife was ac- 
tually not Jewish? Moreover, there 
was the consideration that such a 
religious man as the president would 
not have married a Christian woman 
unless she was first converted to 
Judaism in strict compliance with 
law and tradition. 

The rabbi in the meantime kept 
silent about the affair while simul- 
taneously praying for the evapora- 
tion of the shiduch. But there seem- 
ingly was more effective supplica- 
tion from the other side for the blos- 

( Please Turn To Page 58) 







The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



13 



FACING THE NEW YEAR 

By DR. ISRAEL GOLDSTEIN, President, 
The American Jewish Congress 



In this solemn High Holy Day 
season, Jews everywhere are weigh- 
ing the experiences of the past year 
in order to fix their sights for the 
year 5714 which lies ahead. We 
have witnessed momentous devel- 
opments in many areas of the globe. 
Together with all peoples of the 
world, we join in hailing the truce 
in Korea and devoutly pray that, 
through the agency of the United 
■Rations, men can once again re- 
sume the thread of their lives with- 
out fear of war. While this stirring 
event must hearten men of good- 
will everywhere, we must still con- 
template a future in which the dark 



menace of totalitarianism continues 
to cast its evil shadow. 

During this past year, Jews and 
free peoples throughout the world 
were profoundly shocked and 
alarmed bv events in the Soviet 
Union and its satellite states where 
it appeared that Jews had been sin- 
gled out for especially ruthless treat- 
ment. This repudiation in recent 
months by the Communist powers 
of this anti - Jewish policy has 
brought us immense relief. We pray 
that the resumption of diplomatic 
relations between the USSR and 
Israel augers that a more enlightened 
and humane policv will be adopted 



PRESIDENT EISENHOWER'S ROSH HASHONAH MESSAGE 




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"Among the greatest lessons your history can teach, as the world 
struggles to find its way toward peace, are the patience and goodwill 
that have so frequently seen expression in the thousands of vears of 
Jewish life. 

"May this New Year bring to peoples of good faith everywhere 
the reassurance that more tranquil days are indeed near, and that the 
citizens of all nations will learn to live together with the understand- 
ing and harmony that God-loving people so fervently desire." 



1953 



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by the Kremlin towards its Jewish 
community. We must not, how- 
ever, be hilled into relaxing our vigi- 
lance and intense concern for our 
brethren behind the Iron Curtain. 

We have also witnessed during 
the past year an epochal and un- 
paralleled event in Jewish history 
with the successful conclusion of 
the reparations negotiations with 
West Germany. This agreement 
was made possible only because des- 
paratc Jewish groups enthusiastically 
joined forces in a most inspiring 
demonstration of unity. We fer- 
vently hope that such unity will be 
further strengthened and consoli- 
dated in the year ahead. 

In recent weeks, Jews the world 
over have noted with deepest inter- 
est the proceedings of the Third 
Plenary Session of the World Jew- 
ish Congress, where the representa- 
tives of Jewish communities of more 
than 65 nations met to deliberate 
on matters of mutual concern. This 
conference dramatically and con- 
cretely expressed the will to unity 
of the Jewish people and provided, 
as well, a vivid demonstration of its 
will toward creative survival. 

Events in Israel give us added 
assurance that the young nation is 
continuing to develop in consonance 
with the highest ideals of democ- 
racy and Judaism. It is struggling 
heroically to overcome its grave eco- 
nomic and political difficulties. Israel 
is still ringed by hostile nations 
who, we sincerely hope, will soon 
be brought to realize that the com- 
mon prosperity and progress of the 
entire Middle East depend on a sta- 
ble and enduring peace. We pray 
that the good offices of the free na- 
tions will be exerted toward pro- 
moting this end. At the beginning 
of this New Year, it is fitting that 
we renew our determination to ren- 
der our utmost financial and moral 
support to Israel so that she may 
achieve durable peace and economic 
security. 

At home, Americans who vener- 
ate the noble traditions of freedom 
and equal opportunity inherent in 
our wav of life have been dismayed 
by the efforts of some men to under- 
mine that precious heritage. Ameri- 
cans of all faiths and political group- 
ings have been appalled by the abuse 
of Congress' legitimate right of in- 
vestigation to spread fear and in- 
timidation and to suppress freedom 
of expression. We have been hor- 
rified at the spectacle of some 
Americans advocating the resort to 
the totalitarian extreme of book- 
burning. However, it is gratifying 
that in recent months there have 
increasingly appeared vigorous con- 



demnations of those excesses by 
leading statesmen, clergymen, edu- 
cators and publicists. Let us pray 
that this will strengthen our de- 
termination to withstand further 
un-American onslaughts on our free- 
doms. 

We are also confronted today 
with the fundamental and inescap- 
able task of bringing our immigra- 
tion law into conformity with 
American democratic principles and 
ideals. The passage of the emer- 
gency refugee bill may help to re- 
gain for our country some of the 
stature we lost abroad through the 
enactment of the McCarran-Walter 
bill, but we shall never fully undo 
the harm wrought by that legisla- 
tion until its discriminatory provi- 
sions, and particularly the racist na- 
tional origins system on which it 
rests, are repealed. Let us earnestly 
hope that the President will be en- 
couraged by the successful enact- 
ment of the refugee bill, which he 
sponsored, to redeem his election 
pledge for the revision of the Mc- 
Carran-Walter Immigration law. 

We Jews, who have throughout 
the century been among the fore- 
most in cultivating the ideals of hu- 
man freedom and dignity, must in 
the year ahead rededicate ourselves 
to the continuing struggle for the 
triumph of those ideals which are 
inextricably linked with the heritage 
of Judaism. This precious religious 
and cultural heritage we must zeal- 
ouslv guard and enrich as we aid in 
promoting the world - wide dream 
of peace, progress and social justice. 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



IS 



GREETINGS FOR THE NEW YEAR 
FROM 

THE VICE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES 




VICE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES. RICHARD NIXON 

Within the heart of every man and woman, as he sees the dawn 
of a New Year, is a praver for peace, security of soul, happiness and 
security for his family and his people. 

May it come to pass soon that there will be planted the lasting 
roots for understanding and brotherhood among people of all lands 
and all faiths, so that mutual trust will replace doubt and persecution. 

And may the hand of friendship extend around the globe from 
one to another, and all the nations of the earth be blessed with the 
love of liberty so that justice for all will prevail throughout the world. 

FROM MONTREUX TO GENEVA 

By DR. MAURICE L PERLZEIG 

The five years which have elapsed Jewish communities 



since the holding of the Plenary 
Session of the World Jewish Con- 
gress in Montreux have been among 
the most significant in the history 
of the Jewish people. The march 
of events has, indeed, brought some 
losses. The remnants of the historic 




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in the lands 
which stretch from the Baltic to 
the Black Sea, and which were 
once a reservoir of strength and a 
source of spiritual renewal both for 
Israel and the great centers of Jewish 
life in the Western World, have 
been taken out of the common life 
of the Jewish people. Their voice, 
ev en though muffled, was still heard 
at Montreux. They still maintain, 
however, their place in our hopes 
and anxieties; and to them must be 
added the great Jewish community 
of Soviet Russia, with which we 
had an intermittent contact during 
the war years and immediately 
thereafter. We cannot accept these 
losses as final. Eastern Europe re- 
mains high on the agenda of the 
Congress as unfinished business. 

But against these losses, far 
reaching gains can be recorded. 
Communities and organizations, 
large and small, in sixteen countries, 
have been added to the list of those 
within the orbit of the Congress, 
bringing the number up to the im- 
pressive total of sixty-five. 




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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




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But it is in the field of interna- 
tional affairs, particularly in the 
United Nations that the most strik- 
ing gains have been achieved during 
the past five years. The Congress, 
which was one of the first organiza- 
tions to be granted Consultative 
Status by the United Nations Eco- 
nomic and Social Council under 
Article 71 of the Charter, has es- 
tablished an enviable record in the 
United Nations equalled by few, if 
any, organizations, Jewish or non- 
Jewish. It has used the opportuni- 
ties which the United Nations has 
afforded to protect Jewish communi- 
ties under attack, and to make a 
contribution to the development of 
international instruments for the 
protection of refugees, the promo- 
tion of respect for human rights, 
and the redress of injuries inflicted 
by the war. To this must be added 
the part which Congress has played 
in the organization and safeguard- 
ing of the rights of non-govern- 
mental organizations with the 
United Nations, in which its spokes- 
men and representatives have plaved 
a foremost part. 

The Congress has been repre- 
sented at every meeting of the Gen- 
eral Assembly and 'of the Economic 
and Social Council, every session 
of the Commission on Human 
Rights and of the sub-commission 
on Discrimination and the Protec- 
tion of Minorities. Its spokesmen 
have been heard repeatedlv by these 
two bodies, and numerous written 
submissions have been presented to 
them as well as to every meeting 
of the Economic and Social Coun- 
cil. Whenever it has been appropri- 
ate, written submissions have been 
circulated among members of the 
Assembly, or of its committees. 
Spokesmen of the Congress have 
also been heard by international 
diplomatic conferences summoned 
by the United Nations, and have 
participated in the work of sub- 
sidiary bodies such as the Social 
Commission, refugee conferences 
and committees, and UNICEF 
(United Nations International Chil- 
dren's Emergency Fund). These 
efforts have been acknowledged and 
praised repeatedly by the representa- 
tives of Governments. When the 
whole consultative process was 
under review by the Economic and 
Social Council early in 1950, and 
members of the Council criticized 
some non-governmental organiza- 
tions for using the Council as a 
forum for propaganda, the Austral- 
ian delegate drew attention to the 
work which some organizations had 
done in "rendering very real assist- 
ance" to the Economic and Social 
Council and its commissions. Of 



all these bodies, numbering at that 
time some ninetv throughout the 
world, he singled out two by name, 
of which the World Jewish Con- 
gress was one. 

The meeting at which the Aus- 
tralian delegate spoke had under 
consideration a report on the use 
made of the consultative process, 
and this report contained a com- 
mendatory reference bv British and 
French delegates to the use made 
bv one organization of a rule of 
procedure of which it alone had 
understood the value. This organ- 
ization was the World Jewish Con- 
gress and reference was made to 
the effort of the Congress which 
resulted in a resolution by the Eco- 
nomic and Social Council on the 
defense of human rights in Middle 
Eastern countries when Jews were 
under attack in Moslem lands at 
the time of the Israel war of in- 
dependence. 

Another precedent established by 
the Congress was the appearance 
four times by its consultant before 
the sixty-member nation Political 
Committee of the General Assem- 
bly on behalf of the Jews of Tripoli- 
tania in the debates on the future 
of the Italian colonies. This re- 
mains the only occasion on record 
when a spokesman for a minority 
was heard by the Assembly. 

Congress has earnestly sought to 
make a distinctive contribution to 
the protection of the rights of all 
men. Some of its most effective 
work was done in the course of the 
elaboration of the Universal Declara- 
tion of Human Rights, which was 
finally adopted by the General As- 
sembly at its Paris session in De- 
cember, 1948. The Congress par- 
ticipated at every stage of the work, 
and its influence may be seen in the 
articles dealing with the prohibition 
of incitement to racial and religious 
discrimination, the right of asylum, 
and the definition of the kind of 
education to which everyone is en- 
titled. At the same meeting the 
Assembly adopted the text of the 
Convention on Genocide. More- 
over, two resolutions were passed 
which had been suggested by the 
Congress, instructing the Secretary 
General to investigate and report 
on certain aspects of the problem 
of statelessness and the protection 
of minorities. 

Space does not permit me to re- 
cord all that Congress has sought 
to do in the field of international 
legislation. It has pressed for the 
conclusion of certain principles and 
procedures, notably the light of pe- 
tition in the Covenant on Human 
Rights. And in considerable meas- 
( Please Turn To Page 52) 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



17 



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THE SYNAGOGUE 

By DR. SAMUEL BELKIN, President, Yeshiva University 



The Synagogue in historic Juda- 
ism occupies a position much dif- 
ferent than that of the Church in 
the non-Jewish world. In the lat- 
ter, one's confession of faith is en- 
tirely reflected by his identification 
with a house of worship. The non- 
Jewish world, in the main, speaks 
of the Church as equivalent to the 
totality of religion and most of its 
religions teach that there is no sal- 




DR SAMUEL BELKIN 

vation outside of it. The Jewish 
Synagogue, on the other hand, has 
never claimed to be the sole dis- 
penser of salvation. Never has it 
attempted to hold a mortgage upon 
the spiritual life of the individual 
Jew. 

Nevertheless, while the possibil- 
ity exists for one to be a good Jew 
individually even if he does not at- 
tend the Svnagogue, he cannot be 
a part of the religious Jewish Com- 
munity unless he is actively identi- 
fied with it. 

The entire concept of Jewish 
community has its origin in and 
draws its vitality from the Syna- 
gogue. God's name is sanctified, our 
Rabbis tell us, only through com- 
munity association. In the Talmud 
the concept of "Tzibur" is men- 
tioned only with reference to the 
Svnagogue, for it is only when we 
join our fellow-Jews in Synagogue 
worship and activity that we affirm 
the peoplchood of Israel. We then 
demonstrate the unity of belief and 
observance that transforms us from 
a collection of individuals into an 



integrated community. The Jewish 
concept of community is then, 
above all, a membership of the 
spirit, a religious communion. 

Judaism docs not recognize two 
independent spheres of duty and 
aetivitv. It does not characterize 
the duties that man has toward his 
fellow-man and to the community 
at large as simply moral or social 
obligations. It cannot be satisfied 
with other-worldliness alone and 
regard what is of this world as secu- 
lar. It rather emphasizes that the 
Community, to be vital and con- 
structive, must be vested w ith holi- 
ness and sanctity. Such holiness 
sanctitv can exist only where both 
community living and the daily life 
of the individual arc endowed with 
spiritual elements. 

This state of sanctity and holi- 
ness, which Judaism requires, is 
achieved not so much by the dedi- 
cation of one's entire life to other- 
worldliness or by withdrawing from 
the affairs of the material world, as 
it is bv one's ability to consecrate 
his social and secular activities to a 
higher moral and spiritual purpose 
and dedicate his daily permissible 
acts to a Godlv motive. The su- 
preme aim of "Kedushah" is the 
sanctification of the commonplace 
by hallowing the licit and by giving 
our earthly virtue a heavenly ideal. 
It is our daily deeds "for the sake 
of heaven" that constitute holiness. 

Tradition has, therefore, never 
separated the concepts that are in- 
herent in the words Bet Haknesset 
and Bet Ilatfilah. The first, freely 
translated, means a communitv 
house; the second, a house of 
praver. The traditional Synagogue 
is both of these — an eternal protest 
against the separation of the secular 
and the sacred in community ac- 
tivities. 

This spiritual, yet this-worldly 
character of the Synagogue as a 
svmbol of the Jewish community is 
made possible through the Torah. 
Fundamental to the religion of 
Israel is the concept that "the ig- 
norant cannot be pious". (Let us 
always remember that Judaism is 
the religion not only of the sage 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



I i 



but of the entire congregation of 
Jacob). The Synagogue was, from 
its beginnings a House of Study in 
which instruction in the Torah — 
the way of Jewish life — was an or- 
ganic and indivisible part of wor- 
ship. It is not strange that the an- 
cient Greeks described the Jewish 
Synagogue as a place where the re- 
ligious and national philosophy of 
Judaism was expounded. 

Our Sages sought to preserve this 
ideal even in their legislation. A 
community, according to Jewish 
law, mav transform a House of 
Worship into a House of Study, al- 
though it mav not reverse the pro- 
cess, for the sanctity of the latter 
is greater than that of the former. 
Thus our sages recognized, as we 
must, that methodic instruction in 
the law and moral precepts of the 
Torah is the foundation of Judaism. 

Let us discover to what degree 
the traditional functions of the 
Synagogue have been preserved in 
America. There was a time when 
American Jewry was considered the 
"spiritual step-child" of the learned 
Jewish aristocracy of Europe. To- 
day, however, but two centers re- 
main which must preserve all the 
'deals of Judaism — Israel and the 
Inited States. The most populous 
and influential Jewish community 
resides in the United States. We 
have the greater responsibility, 
therefore, to rebuild here, that 
which was destroyed overseas. 

Now, what of the Synagogue in 
America? The main problem that 
faces traditional Judaism on this 
continent is not, altogether, the 
laxity in attendance at Synagogue 
services — a serious enough com- 
plaint. It is rather the unfortunate 
fact that Judaism in America has 
become the Judaism of the Syna- 
gogue only; the fact that the entire 
religious life of American Jewry has 
become centered about Synagogue 
worship. One's loyalty to Judaism 
is no longer judged bv his entire 
mode of living, but by his associa- 
tion and identification with a 
House of Worship. True, tradi- 
tional worship is a vital part of the 
totality of Judaism, but the ritual 
and service of the Synagogue, di- 
vorced from practice of Judaism in 
one's private life, is not a sufficient 



spiritual force to preserve Judaism 
and the Jew. 

What are the remedies to this 
ill? In our judgment, a major ef- 
fort must be made to re-institute 
the theme of Bet Ha-Midrash in 
the concept of Synagogue; to make 
the Synagogue once more the insti- 
tute of religious education; to make 
instruction in the Torah an organic 
part of worship and its most promi- 
nent feature. It is through what 
may be called community learning 
that the creative function of the 
Synagogue can be revealed. 

One cannot treat Jewish piety 
and Torah learning as separate and 
independent matters, for Jewish 
practice is based upon Jewish learn- 
ing. When a non-Jew desires to be 
accepted as a proselyte, he is first 
instructed in the laws of the Torah 
and acquainted with its command- 
ments, even before the ritual of cir- 
cumcision is performed. 

In America, now, nothing less 
.than a conversion, nothing less 
.than an inner change is necessary, 
,a spiritual rededication to historic 
Judaism. Before that can be 
.achieved, it is necessary that our 
.people be instructed in the essence 
of Judaism. The Synagogue is to- 
,dav the only institution that can 
serve as a center for this instruction 
in the principles and practices of 
Judaism. The Synagogue must 
.again become the school, as it has 
.been from time immorial. The 
sermon must not be permitted to 
become merely a discussion of "cur- 
rent events". It must be an instruc- 
tive talk on the fundamental princi- 
ples of Jewish theory and practice. 
The Friday night lecture should 
deal with problems that pertain to 
Judaism as well as to Jews. The 
Rabbi may not be able to solve the 
problems of anti-Semitism but he is 
responsible for the clarification of 
the meaning and purpose of Jcw- 
ishness. 

The Synagogue has maintained 
its centrality in Jewish life because 
it endeavored to channel the daily 
activities of the individual through 
instruction and worship. It was a 
spiritual dynamo which radiated 
the light of Torah to every Jewish 
home. If the Synagogue does not 
wish to function in a void, it must 
(Please Turn To Page 76) 




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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




s The Diaspora In Exile? 



By DR. SOLOMON GRAYZEL 
Editor, Jewish Publication Society of America 



DR. SOLOMON GRAYZEL 



The Diaspora is a problem. No 
one feels this more keenly than a 
Jewish visitor to Israel. He is ex- 
hilarated by the phenomenon of a 
Jewish nation at work; he is stirred 
by the enthusiasm with which rocks 
and sand are being turned into pro- 
ductive soil; he is amazed by the 
cultural standards of a population 



which refuses to be overwhelmed bv 
its innumerable social, political and 
economic problems. Before long, 
however, the visitor cannot but con- 
trast all that he sees and senses in 
Israel with the lack of communal 
solidarity, the escapism and the cul- 
tural apathy which characterize the 
Jewish communities in most other 



parts of the world, llie Israelis, for 
their part, make no secret of their 
concern for the Diaspora's future. 
Having themselves but recently 
come out of such communities, they 
know full well the perils, both phy- 
sical and spiritual, we have to face. 
Thus the tables are turned. To the 
visitor's surprise, he, who came to 




RELIGIOUS SCHOOL TEACHERS MEET AT WILDACRES 



Once again Wildacres, the estate 
of Mr. and Mrs. I. D. Blumenthal, 
at Little Switzerland, N. C, was the 
scene of an inspiring gathering of 
educators during the week of Au- 
gust 17th. It was the Institute of 
Religious School Teachers, and the 



guiding spirit was Miss Lillie Ru- 
bee, Consultant Teacher, The Jew- 
ish Education Committee of New 
York. Those attending from 
Greensboro were: Rabbi and Mrs. 
Simcha Kling, and family; Rabbi 
Fred Rypins; Mr. and Mrs. Ernest 



Stad'ijem; Mrs. Cele Levine; Mrs. 
Rose Bach; Joan Greenberg; Mr. 
and Mrs. Sidney Schreiber; Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Ganderson; Mr. and 
Mrs. Zacher Melnikov, and Mr. 
and Mrs. A. F. Klein, and Jack 
Salz. 



extend sympathy, finds himself the 
recipient of it; he, who had been 
fearful for Israel's future, discovers 
that the Israelis have doubts about 
his future as a Jew. It is suddenly 
borne in upon the visitor that one 
result of Israel's existence is to com- 
pel the Diaspora Jew to re- think his 
status, to find his place in Jewish 
life, to consider his function as a 
Jew both in the world in general 
and in relation to the national com- 
munity is Israel. Basically this per- 
plexitv reduces itself to two related 
questions: Is the existence of a 
Diaspora an abnormal situation, 
especially when the national com- 
munitv is ready to receive all who 
want to come? Is the Diaspora Jew 
living the life of an exile, with all 
the tragedy of frustration and lone- 
liness which this term implies? If 
so, is he not foolish to stay away 
from "home"? 

Whether the Jewish Diaspora is 
or is not normal, it is certainly 
unique. No other group has ever 
maintained itself so vigorously and 
so long simultaneously in so many 
different environments. But unique- 
ness is not abnormality. It would 
seem absurd to consider abnormal 
anything which has existed for 
twentv-five centuries. How long 
docs a situation have to obtain be- 
fore it can be called normal? Nor 
is failure to become reconciled to it 
— assuming that the Jews never did 
become reconciled to Diaspora life 
— evidence that a situation is abnor- 
mal. We have not become recon- 
ciled to the existence of injustice; 
we do not like it, but it would be 
naive to say it is abnormal in human 
society. 

What has misled people — Jews 
and Christians — into calling the 
Diaspora abnormal is the fact that 
it has been such a surprising phe- 
nomenon. Even when explained it 
appears incredible, as startling as a 
miracle, to which it has been fre- 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



2 



quentlv compared. Yet the fact is 
that the social group known as the 
Jewish people has lived during its 
long history under a variety of or- 
ganizational forms. Sometimes it 
was only a nation; at other times it 
consisted of scattered communities 
held together by religious and cul- 
tural bonds; and for a considerable 
number of centuries both forms, the 
national and the Diaspora, co- 
existed, as they do today. But the 
Jews have always been one people. 
It is quite as wrong (that is, un- 
historical) for a citizen of the Jewish 
nation todav to deny the validity 
(that -is, the normality) of the 
Diaspora as it is for a Diaspora Jew 
to consider as tragic the national 
organization of a portion of the Jew- 
ish people. 

The onlv test that may be applied 
to the Diaspora, to decide whether 
or not it ought to continue, is the 
test of inner worth, that is, in terms 
of its spiritual strength and cul- 
tural productivity. If Diaspora life 
has been as barren as its detractors 
maintain, if the Jewish communities 
outside of Palestine have been as 
foreign to their respective environ- 
ments as every antisemite has pro- 
claimed, then the Diaspora must be 
considered to have been and to have 
remained a failure. But if Diaspora 
life produced results, managing in 
the case of many communities to 
develop within their environments, 
it must be considered a healthy 
spiritual manifestation which, far 
from being deplored, should be en- 
couraged. 

Since this is not an essay in Jew- 
ish apologetics, generalizations will 
lave to suffice and the reader will 
have to be referred to Jewish his- 
tories for actual proof. The fact is 
that Jewish Diaspora communities 
actively participated in the life about 
them and substantially contributed 
to its improvement. Can anyone 
imagine that the Jews would have 
been permitted to survive if they 
had not been useful to the society 
in which they lived? All the inter- 
ested reader need do is to note that 
in most instances the Jews were 
expelled from a country only when 



the particular economic and social 
function which they performed was 
no longer required; they were re- 
admitted when it became clear that 
certain functions could be best per- 
formed bv them. It is even clearer 
that the Jews became rooted in their 
environments. The languages they 
spoke, the names by which they 
called themselves, the books they 
wrote and read, the characteristics 
they acquired — all testify to their 
integration with the society of which 
thev formed a part. 

The one thing which they did not 
give up was that complex of mem- 
ories, values and hopes which goes 
by the name of Judaism and the 
ritual in which these were expressed. 
These, too, were discussed, modi- 
fied and developed. It takes an al- 
most pathological denial of history 
to think that one can throw himself 
culturally or religiously back to bibli- 
cal or mishnic life and disregard 
all that has happened between the 
vears of Roman tyranny and the 
British mandate. In life, language, 
modes of thought and even physi- 
ology, the modern Jew, in or out- 
side of Israel, is largely the product 
of the centuries between these two 
eras. 

It is important to remember that 
Jewish life has been tried in every 
land and in the midst of every cul- 
ture, in everv age and under every 
variety of circumstances. The suc- 
cess of Judaism in making the neces- 
sary spiritual adjustments is one of 
the Diaspora's greatest achievements 
and proves that it enjoyed an inde- 
pendent and fruitful existence. Had 
it led a purely vegetative life, char- 
acterized by the rigidity and gloom 
which some have attributed to it, 
the organized cultures, whether 
Christian or Moslem, which sur- 
rounded the Diaspora communities 
would not have been afraid of Juda- 
ism and would not have forced it 
into ghettos in order to destroy it. 
Jewish life never decayed from 
within, except in those communities 
which were separated by circum- 
stances from the living fountains of 
the Jewish spirit. In practically 
everv instance where a Diaspora 
community ceased to exist, its de- 
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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



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5713 — A YEAR OF CHALLENGE 
AND ACCOMPLISHMENT 

By EDWARD M. M. WARBURG, General Chairman U. J. A. 



For American Jews, whose deep 
and continuing interest in Jewish 
events abroad has been amply dem- 
onstrated many times, the year 571 3 
was one of the most challenging in 
recent times. 

5713 opened on a note of emer- 
gency in Israel. Jack D. Weiler, 
UJA National Campaign Chairman, 
who surveyed conditions in the 
young State at the time reported 
that it was facing a desperate dollar 
shortage which seriously threatened 
the nation's economy. 

In a cable from Jerusalem he 
urged that swift, broad-scale meas- 
ures be taken to improve the situa- 
tion of more than 240,000 immi- 
grants still living in tents and flimsy 
shelters, to prevent further cuts in 
the limited Israel food ration and 
to provide means for much-needed 
irrigation and land development. 
Aid was sorely needed also, he indi- 
cated, to further programs of wel- 
fare, relief and training in North 
Africa. 

The call for dollars was urgent. 
Thus a campaign for cash with a 
goal of $35,000,000 was set in mo- 
tion, energetically led by UJA's na- 
tional chairman, cabinet members 
and a National Cash Cabinet of 160 
community leaders. 

First results of this drive were 
most heartening. More than half 
the required sum in cash was turned 
in at Washington at a UJA Na- 
tional Leadership Conference on 
October 19. Imbued with sympa- 
thy, understanding and zeal, Ameri- 
can Jews everywhere sought to help 
in overcoming the effects of what 
Ambassador Eban described as "th 
sharp pangs of rapid growth" in 
Israel. 

Then in November as community 
drives were moving forward to gath- 
er in the balance of the cash sum 
required, there came with dramatic 
suddenness the news from Eastern 
Europe: Anti-Semitism was erupt- 
ing behind the Iron Curtain. 



The Prague trials and executions 
which followed were succeeded by 
a series of grim events, including 
arrests and imprisonments in the- 
Soviet Union and the satellite coun- 
tries, an organized campaign of anti- 
Semitic propaganda, and the sever- 
ing of diplomatic relations between 
the U.S.S.R. anrl TsraH, 




EDWARD M. M. WARBURG 

From November through March 
the tension mounted, and the deep- 
est concern was belt here for the 
eventual fate of 2,500,000 Jews in 
the Soviet world. 

Determined to do everything pos- 
sible to provide practical means of 
aid for those who might emerge 
from behind the Iron Curtain, 
American Jewry immediately swung 
into action. 

The officers of the United Jewish 
Appeal immediately organized the 
Campaign on an emergency basis 
calculated to enlist the best leader- 
ship in the country in the most ef- 
fective manner. The three National 
Chairmen, who had in the past 
served as representatives of the con- 
stituent agencies were augmented 
by five National Campaign Chair- 
men and the National Campaign 
Cabinet was expanded so that every 
part of the country was represented 
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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



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This gave the Cabinet the benefit 
of some of the finest leadership in 
country. Elected to the Cabinet 
were Morris W. Berinstein of Syra- 
cuse, a former chairman of the 
UJA National Campaign Cabinet, 
Joseph Holtzman of Detroit, Sol 
Luckman of Cincinnati and Wil- 
liam Rosenwald and Jack Weiler of 
New York. 

The three National Chairmen 
representing the constituent agen- 
cies were Walter Bieringer of Bos- 
ton, for the United Service for New 
Americans; Rudolph G. Sonneborn 
of New York for the United Israel 
Appeal; and Rabbi Jonah B. Wise 
of New York for the Joint Distribu- 
tion Committee. 

The Cabinet was further strength- 
ened by the appointment of Samuel 
H. Daroff, Honorary President of 
the Allied Jewish Appeal of Phila- 
delphia and 1953 Co-Chairman of 
Special Gifts, to leadership as the 
Cabinet's Chairman. Mr. Daroff 
had been one of the most dynamic 
members of the Cabinet since its 
inception. 

Thus American Jewry was fully 
girded for any eventuality. This 
time, in contrast to the Hitler emer- 
gency, there was a UJA ready and 
able to channel aid to those in need. 
And this time, too, a State of Israel 
existed to offer haven and succor to 
the oppressed. 

The gravity of the developing 
crisis was reflected at the Annual 
National Conference of the UJA in 
December, which marked the be- 
ginning of the United Jewish Ap- 
peal's 15th year of service. The 
spirit of decision and determination 
of UJA supporters was evidenced in 
a surge of increased giving in the 
weeks that followed. From city 





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after city came encouraging reports 
of sizeable gains in opening cam- 
paign efforts. In a moment of crisis 
then, there came a reaffirmation of 
what those who are most familiar 
with the American Jewish commu- 
nity have always known — that the 
roots of the UJA go broad and deep 
in our community life. 

Similarly encouraging were the re- 
sults of the National Inaugural Con- 
ference in Miami Beach in February 
which produced a record outpouring 
of gifts totalling the unprecedented 
sum of $14,150,000 — an accurate 
measure of the deep sense of respon- 
sibility felt by American Jews for 
their threatened and helpless fellow- 
Jews overseas. 

A nationwide Freedom Mobiliza- 
tion late in March, highlighted bv a 
mass rally in New York and linked 
by a radio-telephone hookup of prin- 
cipal cities, further demonstrated 
the determination of American Jews 
to stand together "united in mercv." 

In March, changes in the U. S. 
S. R. following the death of Stalin 
produced the release of the arrested 
Jewish physicians and the apparent 
easing of official pressures on Jews 
in Soviet and satellite Europe. But 
it was evident that for tens of thou- 
sands of Jews in Eastern Europe, 
Israel remained a longed-for goal. 
Israel's doors were, and continue to 
be, wide open to Jews from the So- 
viet world. 

For a brief period in December 
and January, several hundred Jews 
of East Germany managed to reach 
Western Europe. There they were 
aided by the Joint Distribution 
Committee and later by the United 
Israel Appeal, with UJA funds. 
When and as further emigration be- 
comes possible, all are agreed that 
we must stand ready to offer means 
of survival and resettlement to those 
without other sources of aid. 

Meanwhile, other far-reaching ob- 
jectives of the UJA's agencies were 
steadily advanced through the de- 
voted action of the American Jew- 
ish community. 

The effectiveness of this action 
was manifested again this past 
spring, when a call for cash was 
sounded to meet current and critical 
needs in all the areas of our effort, 
but especially in hard-pressed Israel. 

Climax of this drive was the Na- 
tional Action Conference earlv in 
June, when $20,391,000— the great- 
est cash fund ever gathered at a sin- 
gle meeting — poured in, in a mighty 
demonstration of devotion to the 
UJA's humanitarian aims. 

Standing together and serving to- 
gether in 5713, the men and wom- 
en of the UJA have improved the 




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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



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lives of more than 500,000 persons 
in many places. 

Through the United Israel Ap- 
peal and its beneficiaries, the Jewish 
Agency and Keren Hayesod, 335,000 
received help. The joint Distribu- 
tion Committee, operating in Eu- 
rope, North Africa and under the 
banner of the famous Malben or- 
ganization in Israel, aided 180,000. 
And in the United States additional 
thousands of recent newcomers were 
assisted. 

In print, these are the cold figures. 
In actuality, the numbers translate 
into individual human beings, most 
of whom have suffered and strug- 
gled against tremendous odds — all 
of whom have dreamed modest 
dreams of freedom, peace and some 
measure of security. It is of the in- 
dividuals that most UJA contribu- 
tors think when they make their 
generous gifts. 

For these individuals, UJA aid 
took various forms. UJA funds made 
possible assistance in the form of 
food, clothing and temporary shel- 
ter, as well as in small cash grants 
and loans. This included aid in 
Israel's ma'abaroth — transit camps 
— where 200,000 newcomers dwell 
in canvas huts and makeshift shel- 
ters until basic housing and better 
work opportunities are opened up to 
them. 

In another direction, UJA funds 
allocated by the United Israel Ap- 
peal provided much-needed assist- 
ance to Israel's expanding economy 
by making available economic aid 
to 23,000 farming families compris- 
ing about 100,000 persons, and ex- 
tending credit, the veritable muscle 
of business, to 20,000 artisans, mer- 
chants and other small businessmen. 

Funds raised through the UJA al- 
so helped to provide machinery and 
equipment to build roads linking 
Israel's towns and villages, and 
brought under irrigation an addi- 
tional 110,000 dunams or 27,500 
acres. This brought the total num- 
ber of dunams in Israel under irriga- 
tion to 600,000, or 125,000 acres, 
many in the once parched Negev. 

In terms of relieving Israel's eco- 
nomic burdens this meant that the 
growing of basic foods could be sub- 
stantially increased, thereby reduc- 
ing the need to import these items 
at a heavy cost in vital dollars. 

UJA funds also helped to build 
10,000 new permanent houses, lift- 
ing the stigma of transiency and 
hand-to-mouth existence from the 
lives of 40,000 persons who had 
known nothing but temporary 
housing for the past ten years. 

UJA funds were utilized for broad 



and sweeping medical efforts that 
directly aided 96,000 men, women 
and children, made remarkable 
strides in the battle against such 
crippling diseases as tuberculosis, 
tinea and trachoma — and helped 
thousands of the aged, invalids and 
incapacitated persons to a degree of 
physical improvement few had 
hoped to attain. 

UJA funds also hleped to provide 
training for 14,000 boys and girls in 
the 240 educational and vocational 
training centers conducted under 
the sponsorship of Youth Alivah. 
As full-fledged farmers these young 
people will bring their vouthful 
energies and newly-acquired skills to 
giv ing life to the once-barren tracts 
of land that are slowly being revit- 
alized throughout Israel. An addi- 
tional 4,000 boys and girls, who ac- 
quired new skills through a special 
program at ORT schools in Israel, 
also were aided by UJA funds 
passed on through the Joint Distri- 
bution Committee. 

American Jews through UJA al- 
so helped establish a most unusual 
village in Israel — JDC's Kfar Zeke- 
nim, the Village of the Aged — 
where 1,000 men and women 60 
years and older, without relatives or 
any means of support, have found 
haven, expert care, work for those 
who can do it, companionship and 
assurance that their twilight years 
will be peaceful and secure. 

In addition, American Jews 
helped give thousands of babies 
their milk and school children their 
hot lunches in North Africa, and 
youngsters their schooling there, in 
Israel, in Europe and in the United 
States. In all these places, we 
helped to create homes, health, 
(Please Turn To Page 70) 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



25 



PLAIN TALK 



By AL SEGAL 



THE KID GETS HIS ANSWER 

One of my grandsons asked me 
what becomes of all the years. The 
boy had seen the new years arriving 
amid festivities and old years sud- 
denlv and mysteriously disappearing 
the night before. 

"Where do they all go?" 

I had no ready answer at the 
moment and had to take up certain 
researches in the matter. I told 
the boy I would try to have all the 
facts in hand by this New Year, 
and now I was read}' to give him the 
answer. 

Only a few days ago he had asked 
me had I found out what became 
of the years. 

"Yes, I know it all now/" I re- 
plied. "I've traced many lost years 
and found out they don't get lost 
at all if handled right. Thev stay 
with us and do you know, boy, some 
of those years are in vou. You 
might say the years are you, and 
the}' are me, too. They are us." 

(If he had been farther along in 
school he would have corrected my 
grammar . . . "Grandpa, you should- 
n't say they are us. You at your 
time should know enough grammar 
to say they are we.") 

"Yes, boy, the years that have 
been are us, you and me and all 
our family and all the people". 

Being a child with an inquiring 
mind, he pursued the question: 
"What you mean? I don't feel no 
year that's in me. There ain't any- 
thing like a year that I can feel in 
me". 

"Sure, boy, I can see the year 
1943 in you. That's the year that 
put you on your knees and started 
you crawling from here to there. 
I was there. You crawled from the 
table to the chair on the other 
side. That year put the first word 
in your mouth, too. You said 
cookie. That was your first word. 
I was there when you said it and 
that was of the year 1943 which 
still sticks to you and in you in that 
way." 

Thus began my treatise on what 
becomes of all the years. I had 
discovered that we ourselves are the 
years. We like to believe that years 
are just dates printed on a calendar, 
but we ourselves make them in 
accordance with the way we have 
lived them. They are us. A year 
gets lost only when a man has lost 
himself in evil pursuit. 

Goodness gracious, this piece is 
getting to sound like a sermon and 



regular readers may be tossing this 
column away from them; since most 
of them don't like sermons. So I 
must hurry and tell you how one 
dav I came to know all this about 
the years and what becomes of 
them. 

It was at a flophouse which stands 
close by the office where I work; it 
provides a meager bed for 50 cents 
a night. It is skid row. I know 
some of the guests there. They 
stand around in front of the place 
and now and then one of them 
greets me: "Hi there, Segal!" 




ALFRED SEGAL 

On that particular day an old 
man whom I know as Joe called me 
as I passed by. 

"Hello, Joe, and how goes it?" 
. . . Joe is never so soaked with 
cheap wine that his philosophy gets 
in the least confused by it. Indeed, 
after one pint of muscatel Joe's 
mind gets brighter than ever and 
his philosophy takes on a mellow 
hue, like autumn leaves. 

I stopped to speak with him; he 
always gives out with ideas that 
frequently are useful to me in one 
or the other of my columns. I 
began by asking him, by the way, 
Joe, how old are you? 

"Well", he replied, "it just so 
happens that by the calendar I am 
80 today but that doesn't mean 
anything. I have no vears at all. 
Mv 80 years are all lost. If I hadn't 
been born at all it would have been 
about the same with me. Years 
are only what we make of them and 
I haven't made a damn thing of 
mine. Lost, wasted years. Dead 
years." 

Joe has an unreasoning admira- 
tion of me; I guess it's because he 
(Please Turn To Page 60) 




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26 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



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EDITORIAL 

(Continued From Page 26) 

of his people, today is Shabbos. It is forbidden to write 
today. And, he said, I decree that God must not write any- 
one's fate for the year ahead. However, he pleaded, there 
is one thing greater than the Sabbath. That is, the saving 
of human life. Now, he reached his conclusion, the Lord 
may only write on this day of judgment that which will 
save our lives: He may only write us down for health and 
prosperity, joy and peace. Else the book must remain a 
blank. I, Itzikel, son of Hannah, so decree the Law. 

We are justified in prayer. Ovinu Malkenu, we cry out; 
Our Father, our King. But we recognize at the same time, 
as the Psalmist did: 

For there is not a word in my tongue, 

But lo, O Lord, Thou knowest it altogether. 

So we sum up our petitions with encouragement and com- 
fort by again quoting from the Psalms, 

My times are in Thy hand and again 

Yea, wait thou for the Lord. 

With this conviction we are now satisfied to cast our 
burdens upon the Lord, knowing that He will sustain us. 
We uttered the prayer, Accept graciously our petitions and 
we resign ourselves to the wise decrees of the Almighty. 
Now we become transported by pure spiritual rapture. We 
no longer harbor selfish ends, we are now exalted, trans- 
ported to a purely spiritual life — we do not even feel the 
pangs of hunger on this great white Fast. The worshipful 
soul seeks unity with the all-pervading spirit of God. But 
even that worship which wells up from the profoundest 
depths falls short of our expectations. They sound hollow 
in the light of the noble ideals which form our treasury of 
the ages. There is only left for us to prostrate ourselves in 
humility and adoration, and to call out, accept graciously 
our petitions. 

We read in the Talmud that Rabbi Ishmael, the High 
Priest, entered into the Holy of Holys on the Day of Atone- 
ment to make intercession for his people. Enveloped in a 
cloud of incense the sage had a vision of the Lord's presence. 

He saw God Himself engaged in prayer. And what was 
the pure prayer whispered in the most sacred place of the 
sanctuary? It was this: God uttered the aspiration, May 
My mercy prevail in the moment of judgment. God's 
words are not uttered in vain. This is the moment of judg- 
ment. His mercy will prevail towards us. Our Amen our 
affirmation, is 

Our Father, our King, accept graciously our petitions. 



Joyce Sybil Cohen, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Cohen, be- 
came the bride of Seymour Bates, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Victor Bates, 
of Greensboro, N. C, in a ceremony 
in the Marshall Room of the John 
Marshall Hotel, Richmond, on Au- 
gust 6th. Rabbi Jacob Milgrim, of 



PETERSBURG. VA. 

Beth El Synagogue, officiated. The 
bride had as her matron of honor 
Mrs. Norman Silverman; of Forest 
Hills, N. Y. Her bridesmaid was 
Mrs. Alvin Cohen, of Norfolk, the 
former Sara Ann Sussman of 
Greensboro. The groom's best man 
was his brother, Louis Bates. 



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Happy New Year 
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RICHMOND, VA. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



27 




UNTO THEM 



BEATRICE LEVIN 

The destroyer shimmered in the 
flash of pure purple agony that 
lighteninged through Elana's thigh. 
She thrust out her body, her feet 
touching the objecting flesh, the hot 
repressive sides of unknown bed- 
fellows. Then it has begun, she 
thought, and found herself smiling 
inanely. She was glad, momen- 
tarily. Dreading it, the waiting had 
been near unendurable, and an un- 
utterable weariness weighted her 
heart. Now a mixture of fear and 
elation made her head feel swim- 
mingly, light, and she held her 
breath, bracing herself for the next 
pain. 

She gasped with its coming, and 
covered her mouth to muffle the 
cry at its sustained burning. Then 
it passed, and she let her head down 
the two inches she had lifted it, 
straining against the agony. Her 
hand went hesitantly to Tvi's back, 
and stopped just before she touched 
him. The moonlight sifted down 
through the open grillwork and she 
saw how he lay there, his long body- 
perspiring, glistening oily, the legs 
so strong and muscular, only the 
buttocks covered with light shorts, 
his broad back turned to her, his 
arm pillowing his head so that one 
long-fingered hand rested on his 
shoulder, the thick next slightly for- 
ward, the black curly hair, tight and 
shiny as Persian lamb fur, buried in 
his arm. 

Before they had come aboard the 
EXODUS, Tvi and Elana had often 
talked for hours in the intimate 
darkness of their bed, exchanging 
not only the thoughts of the day 
but reliving the events of their 
shared and unshared pasts, in their 
whisperings expressing an almost in- 
tolerable desire to know each other, 
feel each other, have and own each 
other, mine out the years that each 
had lived separately, bit by bit, out 
of the unspoken oblivion into the 
conscious heart of each, to evoke a 



. . . A Ban 9& &<ViH 



By BEATRICE LEVIN 



The following is a chapter from a book in progress about the EXODUS 
1947, a ship carrying 4500 refugees from France to Haifa. Intercepted by the 
British, the passengers were disembarked upon three of His Majesty's destroy- 
ers and returned to the original port of embarkation. Refusing to leave their 
ships, except in Palestine, the passengers sat in the broiling heat of summer 
for six long weeks on the prison ships. — THE EDITOR. 



picture of two complete voung lives 
in all their aspects, colors, odors, 
passions, hatreds, loves, delights and 
dislikes, every story each had ever 
heard, every scene or moment by 
which each had been affected. 

Elana's questioning was tireless 
and insatiate. She begged Tvi to 
tell her again and again how his 
Czech regiment had escaped the 
Nazis by a hairsbreadth of trickery, 
and he repeated the story, laughing- 
ly, relishing it with her relish, en- 
joying it with her enjoyment. 

And Elana had told him of Brook- 
lyn, in intimate enhancing whispers 
she had told of that exotic thriving 
community as seen through the eyes 
of a sensitive adolescent girl, lonely 
for her childhood boy friend, impas- 
sioned with loss .... told him of 
the vulgar color of Coney Island, 
the chaotic architecture and the raw 
grimy frame and brick buildings, the 
sands of the beach, the boardwalk 
sounds and sights and smells, the 
miles of naked hot flesh on a sum- 
mer's Sunday. They told each 
other the most intimate secrets of 
two gladly shared hearts. 

"Oh, my God! My GOD!" Elana 
sighed, clenching her teeth as the 
pain crawled up her thigh, searing 
her innards until it broke against her 
mind. In the welcome quiet that 
followed, she thought, maybe we 
delved too deeply into each other. 
Maybe that's why Tvi and I lost 
each other since we came away from 
France. She tried to remember 
when the relations had begun to be 
strained. Since the first night they 
had boarded the EXODUS, they 
rarely spoke to each other inti- 
mately, especially not at night in 
the crowded hold, having exhausted 
both conversation and themselves 
during the day. Tvi had no desire 
to hear her words of resentful indig- 
nation, self-pity, insult or abuse. 
What made her so vile under these 
oppressive conditions? she won- 



dered. Other women didn't take out 
their discomfort, fears and misery 
on their families, did they? Perhaps 
she and Tvi HAD tried to pierce 
the last shreds of each other's pri- 
vacy, delved into each other's most 
sequestered thoughts, shoved bellig- 
erantly at each other's emotions, 
responses and feelings . . . Elana, 
knowing a sense of guilt at her own 
responsibility for this (but only 
because she had adored him, she 
excused herself, onlv because she 
had loved him so radiantly, so 
intensely) hated herself for having 
violated the decent, sacred, warmly 
good relations they had had. 

When the pain came again, she 
bore it with fortitude, assuring her- 
self that it was only just punish- 
ment for her indescribably rotten 
behavior. But before the agony had 
reached its climax, she had to cover 
mouth with both her hands and her 
eyes rolled upward as the tension 
mounted. 

In the brief respite that followed, 
Elana lay back, feeling limp. She 
summoned all the courage and self- 
control in which she had prided 
herself as a young girl, and then told 
herself, I'm not going to scream. I 
absolutely will not carry on like a 
heathen. I am going to do nothing 
to make Tvi ashamed of me. I'm 
going to be brave. 

It was easy enough to think these 
things between pains, but as the 
lightening moved up her thigh and 
back she clenched and unclenched 
her fists, every fiber of her being 
screaming objection and the scream 
was choked and buried in her gag- 
ging mouth. NO! She could not 
bear another one like that. She 
couldn't. 

She fought against the pain until 
the anguish overwhelmed her and 
then the long longness of it passed, 
and she allowed herself to sigh. Her 
whole throat constricted in a loud 
sob. 



It seemed to Elana that she had 
been in the midst of childbirth 
agony since the first moments she 
had boarded the EXODUS. Oh, 
she told herself, we are a rare and 
subtle breed, a people incapable of 
admitting defeat, possessed of majes- 
tic visions and propelled by an exul- 
tancy of unreasonable faith. Oh, 
the cry escaped her lips, oh, oh, oh! 
For now, the pain had reached a 
climax of racking torment so violent 
as to be unbearable. 

"I can't!" she cried, "I can't. It 
hurts too much!" 

Tvi lifted his head and spoke in 
alarm. "Elana!" 

"Tvi," she sighed, comforted by 
his voice. 

He got to his knees and leaned 
over to touch Chaya who sat up 
immediately, the heavy-lidded eyes 
drowsily opening. The moonlight 
flowed down through the grill, soft- 
ening the grotesque outlines of the 
half-naked mass of people lying on 
each other on the floor of the hold. 
"Chaya," Tvi said, "keep an eye on 
Sari for us." He stood up and gath- 
ered Elana into his arms like a 
child, and stepping over the sleeping 
bodies, excusing himself and mutter- 
ing apologies, he wormed his way 
to the foot' of the wooden ladder 
where an old man sat wrapped in 
his talis, praying. 

"Tvi," Elana murmured in her 
husband's ear, "I'm so glad it's 
almost over." 

"I am too, Baby," he assured her, 
holding her close. "I only wish I 
could share the pain." His fervency 
moved her, and surely eased the 
wrenching of the next pain as it 
made its fiery progress through her 
thighs and back. When she relaxed 
again, he climbed to the door of the 
hold where the soldiers sat guard. 
Hearing Tvi's approach, one asked 
sternly, "What do you want?" 

(Please Turn To Page 63) 



28 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 





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MUTTON OR 
LAMB CHOPS 

Trim off some of the fat and heat 
in the spider. Season the chops 
with salt and pepper, or salt and 
ginger. Have the spider very hot 
with very little fat in it. To be 
nice and tender they must be sauted 
quickly to a nice brown. Or the 
chops may be broiled over the hot 
coals or in gas broiler, eight or ten 
minutes is all the time required; 
serve at once. 

SHOULDER OF 
MUTTON STUFFED 

Have the butcher carefully re- 
move the blade from the shoulder 
and fill the space with a bread 
stuffing. Sew up the opening, roast 
in the oven with a very little water 
in the pan, and baste frequently. 
Serve with the gravy from the pan 
after the grease has been carefully 
removed. 

GESCHUNDENE GANS 

Take a verv fat goose for this pur- 
pose. After cleaning and singeing, 
cut off neck, wings and feet. Lay 
the goose on a table, back up, take 
a sharp knife, make a cut from the 
neck down to the tail. Begin again 
at the top near the neck, take off 
the skin, holding it in your left 
hand, your knife in your right hand, 
after all the skin is removed, place it 
in cold water: separate the breast 
from back and cut off joints. Have 
ready in a plate a mixture of salt, 
ginger and a little garlic or onion, 
cut up fine. Rub the joints and 
small pieces with this, and make a 
small incision in each leg and four 
in the breast. Put in each incision 
a small piece of garlic or onion, and 
rub also wit ha prepared mixture of 
salt and ginger. Put away in stone 
jar overnight or until you wish to 
use. 

GAENSEKLEIN 

Rub wings, neck, gizzard, heart 
and back of goose with salt, ginger, 
pepper and garlic and set on the fire 
in a stew-pan with cold water. Cover 
tightly and stew slowly but steadily 
for four hours. When done skim 
off all the fat. Now put a spider 
over the fire, put into it about two 
or three tablespoons of the fat that 
you have just skimmed off and then 
add the fat to the meat again. Cut 
up fine a very small piece of garlic 



and add a heaping teaspoon of flour 
(brown). Add the hot gravy and 
pour all over the goose. Cover up 
tightly and set on back of stove till 
you wish to serve. You may cook 
the whole goose in this way after it 
is cut up. 

STUFFED GOOSE NECK 

Remove skin from neck of goose, 
duck or chicken in one piece. Wash 
and clean well and stuff with same 
mixture as for Kischtke. Sew at 
both ends and roast in hot oven 
until well browned. 
STEWED GOOSE, PIQUANTE 

Cut up, after being skinned, and 
stew, seasoning with salt, pepper, a 
few cloves and a very little lemon 
peel. When done heat a little goose 
fat in a frying-pan, brown half a 
tablespoon of flour, add a little vine- 
gar and the juice of half a lemon. 
MINCED GOOSE 

Take the entire breast of a goose, 
chop up fine in a chopping bowl; 
grate in part of an onion, and season 
with salt, pepper and a tiny piece of 
garlic. Add some grated stale bread 
and work in a few eggs. Press this 
chopped meat back on to the breast 
bone and roast, basting verv often 
with goose fat. 

SQUAB EN CASSEROLE 

Take fowl and brown in a skillet 
the desired color, then add to this 
enough water (or soup stock pre- 
ferred)), put it in casserole and add 
vegetables; add first those that re- 
quire longest cooking. Use mush- 
rooms, carrots, small potatoes and 
peas. If vou like flavor of sherry 
wine, add small wine glass; if not, it 
is just as good. Season well and 
cook in hot oven not too long, as 
you want fowl and vegetables to be 
whole. You may add soup stock if 
it is too dry after being in oven. 

HUNGARIAN VEGETABLE 
SALAD 

Mix together one cup each of 
cold cooked peas, beans, carrots, 
and potatoes. Cover with French 
dressing and let stand for twenty 
minutes. Add one cup of smoked 
salmon or haddock, cut in small 
pieces, the chopped whites of four 
hard-boiled eggs and two stalks of 
celery. Mix thoroughly, garnish 
top with yolk of egg pressed through 
a wire sieve, and with cucumbers 
and beets, cut in fancy shapes. 



For that 

"Smile of Pleasure" 
SAY 

'MAKE MINE 

RUPPERT' 




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Jones Distributing Co. 

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State Distributing Co. 

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NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




THE VIRGINIA REPORTER 



NEWS OF THB STATE Bi OUTLOOK CORRESPONDENTS 




RICHMOND, YA. 




Members of the Beth Ahabah Sisterhood Ways and Means Committee: Mrs. 
Allan Creeger, Mrs. Leonard Policoff and Mrs. Gilbert Rosenthal have fun 
trying on hats to be used in their Gay 90's Revue. 

Beth Ahabah Sisterhood 

Mrs. LeRoy Steiner, Correspondent 



A dinner and Gay 90's Revue is 
planned for the Annual Sisterhood 
Ways and Means Affair. Co-chair- 
mans, Mrs. Allan Creeger, Miss 
Rosalie Schwarzchild and Mrs. 
Leonard Policoff have scheduled 
this gala event for two nights: Tues- 
day, October 13th and Wednesday, 



October 14th; to better accommo- 
date all. 

Tryouts for this big show were 
held September 1 1 th and we have 
a wonderfully talented cast. Don't 
miss the fun. 

Ticket chairman is Mrs. Robert 
Reinhard. 



Temple 

SUKKAH DECORATION 

Our U.S.Y., under the guidance 
of the Sisterhood Schools Commit- 
tee, will be in charge of decorating 
the Sukkah. 

All children in our Hebrew 
School are asked to bring fruit and 
vegetables for the Sukkah on Mon- 
day and Tuesday, September 21 
and 22. Parents are asked to co- 
operate in urging their children to 
bring a Sukkah offering. 

SIMCHAS TORAH 

On Thursday evening, October 
,1, at 7:30 p. m. Simchas Torah 
will be celebrated at the Temple. 
Flags and refreshments will be of- 
fered to the children. However, 
we urge each child to make his own 
flag as his entry in the Simchas 
Torah Flag Contest. 

U.S.Y. SUKKAH PARTY 

The opening meeting of both the 
Junior and Senior branches of 
U.S.Y. will be in the form of a 
joint supper and program on the 



Beth El 

Saturday Eve of Sukkos, September 
26, at 6:30 p. m. 

With the wonderful atmosphere 
of the decorated Sukkah and the 
excited plans drawn up by the 
U.S.Y. leadership all who come are 
in store for a magnificent evening. 
SUNDAY SCHOOL OPENS 
First session of Sunday School was 
set for September 13 at 10:15 a. m. 
Dismissal for all classes will be at 
12:30. 

According to Dr. Sidney Pollack, 
Superintendent, this day will be in 
addition to registration a regular 
complete session. New pupils will 
be brought to the Social Hall. All 
previous Sunday School students 
have received a letter which they 
should bring together with the new 
registration fee of $2.00 to the room 
indicated on the letter. 

An innovation this year, recom- 
mended by the Schools Committee 
and approved by the Board will see 
all materials, supplies and books 



provided at no additional charge to 
the students of the junior and in- 
termediate grades. 

Because of the intervention of 
holidays. Nursery Class registration 
will be on October 8. 

ANNUAL SUKKOS PARTY 

On the first night of Sukkos, 
Wednesday, September 23, at 7:30 
p. m., the Beth-El Family will cele- 
brate the Annual Sukkos Partv. 
This vear in honor of the occasion 
the Choir will participate and the 
organ will be used. Parents are 
asked to notice that Service begins 
at 7:30 so that all children will be 
able to attend. The partv will fol- 
low the Services under the Sukkah 
in our Social Hall. 

THE SUKKAH AND FLAG 
CONTEST 

Beth-El's Brotherhood and Sis- 
terhood will again sponsor the Suk- 
kah and Simchas Torah Flag Con- 
test respectively 

All model Sukkahs must be 
brought to the Temple Social Hall 
no later than Sunday, September 
27, in order to be eligible for the 
contest. 

Sisterhood will again give prizes 
for the most original Simchas 
Torah Flags. Awards will be given 
at the Simchas Torah celebration on 
Thursday evening, October 1, at 
7:30 o'clock. 

We anticipate the same excite- 
ment and enthusiastic response as 
greeted the contests last year. 

HEBREW SCHOOL OPENS 

On Monday, September 14, the 
new semester for our Hebrew 
School began. All previous stu- 
dents will report to the rooms and 
at the time indicated on the letter 
which has been sent to them. New 
pupils are asked to report to the 
Social Hall and registration will 
take place from 3:00 to 5:00 p. m. 

SERVICE CHANGE 

Our Congregation will please 
note that all Evening Services for 
the Holidays henceforth will be at 
8:00 p. m., the same time as our 
Friday Evening Services. Hereto- 
fore our women were unable to at- 
tend Services held at sundown be- 



cause of their duties in preparing 
the family meal. 

We look forward to the entire 
family now attending Holiday 
Services, and are keeping the dic- 
tum in mind, "Families that pray 
together stay together." 

Mr. Israel Mordecai Back has 
been appointed to the post of Prin- 
cipal of the Temple Beth - El 
Schools, according to Mr. Ben 
Katz, Chairman of the Schools 
Committee. 

Mr. Back is 32 years old. He was 
born and raised in the Holy City of 
Jerusalem. His family has been liv- 
ing for seven generations in Israel. 

In 1942 he graduated from the 
Hebrew Teachers College of Jeru- 
salem. He came to the United 
States in 1947 as a student of New 
York University. In 1948 when 
Israel's Independence was declared 
and the State was attacked by seven 
Arab armies Mr. Back returned to 
Israel and joined the Israeli Army. 
He came once again to the United 
States in 1949. Completing his 
courses in the New York University 
he received a B. S. in Recreation 
in 1950 and an M. A. in Supervi- 
sion and Administration of Public 
Schools in 1951. He has completed 
his residence requirements at New 
York University for his PhD. 

Prior to coming to Richmond 
Mr. Back taught at the Emanuel 
Brotherhood of New York City and 
served as Director of Arts and 
Crafts and audio-visual education at 
the United Hebrew Schools in De- 
troit, Mich. 

Mr. Back will teach full time in 
our Hebrew School, supervise the 
extra-curricular and youth activities 
of the Congregation and serve as 
educational consultant in our Sun- 
day School. 

We welcome Mr. Back in our 
midst and wish him many years of 
fruitful and happy association with 
our congregational family. 

PARENTS OF SMALL 
CHILDREN— ATTENTION! 

If your child is between the ages 
of 3 and 6 you will be able to come 
to the Temple during the Holy 



30 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



The Following Firms in . . . 

NORFOLK, YA. 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 



NORFOLK NEWSPAPERS, Inc. 
Publishers of 

NORFOLK VIRGINIAN-PILOT 

Morning and Sunday 

NORFOLK LEDGER-DISPATCH 

Evening Except Sunday 





Two good newspapers dedicated to public 
service and progress in the Tidewater 
area of Virginia and North Carolina. 




Birsch Construction Corporation 

Yard — Norview Ave. and Virginian R. R. 
Office Phone 63-3621 




CONCRETE AND ROAD WORK 

P. O. Box 6026, Milan Sta. 
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Phone 47677 
L. S. BIRSCH 



Phone 54180 
J. LASSITER 



L. S. BIRSCH and COMPANY 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION AND 
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Days with your chid and be able 
to sit through the Adult Services 
with complete peace of mind in the 
knowledge that your child is being 
taken care of. 

This vear our Congregation has 
hired three professional primary 
teachers who will look after your 
children in one of the Temple 
school rooms while vou are at the 
Services. 



If your child is below the age of 
8 please do not seat him in any of 
the older vouth Services. The usher 
in the Social Hall will gladly con- 
duct you and your child to the room 
to which he and his age group have 
been assigned. 

We are glad to be of sendee to 
the members of the Congregation. 
We invite comment on the effect 
of this innovation and request sug- 
gestions for others. 



Beth Torah Congregation 



Mrs. H. Horowitz 
The Beth Torah Congregation 
engaged Cantor Leonard Balk to as- 
sist Rabbi Meyer Lieberman con- 
duct the services for Rosh Hasho- 
nah and Yom Kippur. The services 
Were conducted according to the 
true Orthodox Principles and Tra- 
ditions. 

The Rosh Hashonah services com- 
menced at sundown 6:30 p.m. 
Wednesday, September 9th. The 
morning services on September 10th 
and 11th started at 7:30 a.m. Rabbi 
Lieberman delivered an inspiring 
sermon at 10:30 September 10th, 
"The Significance of the Shofar," 
followed by Rabbi Balk whose topic- 
was "The Obligations of Mankind 
to the Almighty." The afternoon 
services were followed by a sermon 
by Rabbi Lieberman "The Law and 
Principles of Judaism Are Everlast- 
ing." 

Two former students of the Beth 
Torah Hebrew School now attend- 
ing the Talmudical Academy of Bal- 
timore (Aitz Chaim Yeshiva) in- 
spired the congregation when they 
told how the Yeshiva Taught Them 
To Be True and Pious Jews. 

On September 11th at 10:30 



Correspondent 

Rabbi Lieberman delivered an in- 
teresting sermon "The Duties of 
Every Jew for the Coming New 
Year," followed by Cantor Balk who 
spoke on "How To Rear Our Chil- 
dren in a True Jewish Spirit." 

The Yom Kippur services to be 
held Friday, September 1 8th will be 
ushered in at 6:00 p.m. with the 
Traditional chanting of "Kol 
Nidre." This will be followed by a] 
sermon by Rabbi Lieberman "Com- 
paring Yom Kippur in the Time of 
the Has Hamekdosh (The Holy 
Temple) to Yom Kippur in the 
Synagogue Today." Rabbi Balk will 
follow with an address entitled 
Tshuvah (Repentance). 

On Saturday, September 19th, the 
services will start at 7:30 a.m. Yis- 
kor services will be held at 10:30. 
Prior to the Yiskor services Rabbi 
Lieberman will deliver a sermon 
"Memories of Our Dear Departed 
Ones" and Rabbi Balk will speak on 
"Belief and Trust In the Almighty." 

Sunday School will start the latter 
part of September, and we hope to 
have a much larger attendance this 
year. A fine staff will teach and a 
well rounded program has been 
planned. 



Beth Sholom Home For The Aged 

Mrs. Fritz Lowenthal, Correspondent 
In these troubled days we ap- and asked me to wish all of you a 



proach the New Year of 5714 with 
hopes in our hearts for peace, happi- 
ness, and contentedness. Our best 
wishes for health and success go to 
everyone who fights for making this 
world a better one to live in. 

Our aged ladies and gentlemen 
appointed me as their spokesman 



Happy and Prosperous New Year. 
Our residents feel that you, and you, 
and you, are responsible for the 
haven they have found after long 
years of hard work. Can you realize 
what this means to them? If you 
do, you'll never give up to work for 
the Beth Sholom Home. 



New-Bell Storage Corporation 

Phone Norfolk 55307 

"At the Sign of the Bell Since 1912" 

Agent for AERO MAYFLOWER TRANSIT CO. 
Nation-Wide Furniture Movers 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 

RICHMOND, YA. 

Jewish War Veterans 




Dr. Milton D. Cummins, Correspondent 



The summer heat, which is us- 
ually an excuse for decreased activ- 
ity, seems to have had the opposite 
effect on the program of events of 
Richmond Post 155, Jewish War 
Veterans of the U.S. Two of the 
major events of the program year 
took place during this "doldrums" 
period, and the always fine hospital 
visitations were increased in scope 
and in participation. 

The annual swim meet held at 
Camp Hilbert, Richmond Jewish 
Center Day Camp, was sponsored 
by Richmond Post 155 on August 
12. This was a high-light of the 
camp year and was a most success- 
ful occasion. Medals and place rib- 
bons were awarded bv the Post to 
winners in each event, the contest- 
ants of which were graded by age 
groups. All the races were finals 
for each class, the preliminary heats 
having been run off earlier. Ages of 
the participants ranged from six to 
thii teen. 

( 'eremonies began with the rais- 
ing of the flag, then the singing of 
An erica accompanied bv the Camp 
bar d. Mr. Mark Schneider, pro- 
gra.n chairman, made the welcom- 
ing remarks and introduced Post 
Commander Arthur Sesholtz, who 
spoke briefly. Mr. Morton Gott- 
lieb, President of the Richmond 
Jev ish Center and a past com- 
mander of Post 155, concluded the 



MONUMENTS 

Forfy Years' Experience 

Dial Norf. 4-1822 
950 West 21st Street 

Overmyer & Ennis 




1953 



5714 



welcoming ceremonies and began 
the swimming meet. 

In charge of activities was Camp 
Director Herbert Weisberger aided 
by Mrs. Leon Grossman and the 
Camp staff. Judges for the events 
were Post 155 members, Mr. Mor- 
ton Gottlieb, Mr. Mark Schneider 
and Dr. Milton Cummins; starter, 
Mr. Allan Laskoe, and announcer, 
Mr. Eli Feldman. Awards were 
presented by Post Commander Ar- 
thur Sesholtz and Mr. Morton 
Gottlieb. 

Medal winners were Rusty Gross 
in diving finals and Susan Rosen- 
bloom in the front crawl race. 
Other first place winners were: 
Maurice Bernstein, William Cap- 
Ian, Allan Kleinkopf, Mark Axel, 
Jo Benson, And}' Lewis, Susan 
Grossman, Neal Maslan, and Renav 
Nadler. Participants in the water 
ballet which was a fine display of 
precision and coordination were: 
Frona Peck, Joyce Forman, Susan 
Roscnbloom, Louise Kleinkopf, 
Harriet King and Dale Harris. 

Refreshments and souvenirs were 
given to all the campers by the 
Post. Members of the committee 
of Post 155 and its Ladies Auxiliary 
in addition to those alreadv men- 
tioned were: Dr. Bernard Packer, 
Mr. William London, Mrs. Sam 
Aaron, Mrs. Sidney Spim and Mrs. 
David Goldin. Also representing 
the Jewish Center was its vice- 
president, Mrs. Mark Schneider. 

The Stag-Picnic held at Beaufont 
Springs on Thursday, September 
17th, was a real rip-snorter. This 
Was a bring j a-member-night and 
was open to Post members and 
those eligible for membership only. 
This one was really one for the 
books and will be long remembered 
by all who attended. There was a 
limitless supply of hot dogs, beer, 
soft drinks, snacks, and nasherei. 
The committee, led by Senior Vice- 
Commander Irvin Russ, went 
around beaming at the clear evi- 
dence of everyone enjoying the fes- 
tivities. The jokes, stories (stag and 



31 




H. D. OLIVER 

Established 1865 




Funeral Director 
DIAL NORFOLK 2-7353 
COLONIAL AND SHIRLEY AVENUES 



Ask for 



The extra-delicious 

loaf with added 
food values of meat 




BOND BAKERS 

General Baking 
Company 

Dial 2-5756 

NORFOLK, VA. 



Dell and Joe 



DELL'S 

RESTAURANT 

NORFOLK, VA. 



for 

DECORATIVE PAINTING 

Phone 2-9555 NORFOLK, VA. 808 W. 2 1st St. 




DIAL 5-3672 



HIIIIhllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMllllllllllllllilllllll 

mini 



iiiiiiiinii 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiii 



P. C. HARTMAN COMPANY 



833 W. 21st 
Street 




Norfolk 7, 
Va. 



Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration — Sales and Service jjj|j|||jj||ijjj|jj|j||j 



32 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



The Following Firms in . . . 

PORTSMOUTH - NORFOLK, YA. 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 



Use Our West End Branch 3 Drive-In Teller Windows 

NIGHT DEPOSITORY — AMPLE PARKING SPACE 

CITIZENS TRUST CO. 

"The Progressive Bank" 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Main Office West End Branch 

225 High Street 3201 High Street, Corner Vermont Ave. 



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linillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIII 

CITY STEAM LAUNDRY 

and DRY CLEANING 

Special 24-Hour Service on Men's Shirts — Cash and Carry 
614 Middle Street Portsmouth, Va. 

1-Day Cleaning Service — Cash and Carry y-v. i 'Tiori 
3-Days Cleaning Service — Call for and Deliver UlHl I 1Z*>± 



iiimi 
nun 
i 



imimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiMmmiiiimiiiiiimiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiimiimii 



mm 
mm 



LET'S MEET 
and EAT at 

The COLONY 
HOUSE 

• CHOICE STEAKS 

• CHOPS and 

• CHICKEN DINNERS 

3518 Colonial Avenue 
NORFOLK, VA. 



flSSSfifiSftftfiSfiftftS? Sftftftftftf Si ii 



Phone 7-381 I 

BRENNAN 

Jffttimral Home 



711 Washington St. 
PORTSMOUTH, VA. 



• 133 Granby Street 

• 107 W. Freemason 



ANNE LEE 
CANDY SHOPS 

NORFOLK - PORTSMOUTH, VA. 

• 32nd and Granby St. 

• 432 High St. 



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Royal Silver Mfg. Co., Inc. 



REPLATING SILVER, GOLD, NICKEL and CHROME 
QUALITY PLATING SINCE 1907 
424 W. 22nd St. Phone 24435 Norfolk, Va. 

Free Estimates Given Without Obligations 

illllllllllllllllHIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



Happy New Year From 

NORFOLK MATTRESS CO. 

Norfolk, Va. 



* - 
i « 

- > 



EZERA STORM'S SLEEP PRODUCTS 

A NORFOLK INDUSTRY 



otherwise), bull sessions, and re- 
fighting of wars kept the mood 
fluid and enjoyable. Everyone was 
all for another one very soon. 

The hospital visitation committee 
under the leadership of Mr. Bert 
Simon has been doing a really won- 
derful job in entertaining veterans 
at Camp Pickett hospital and at 
McGuire VA hospital. The co- 



ordinated efforts of the Ladies 
Auxiliary and the Post has produced 
a most laudable program which has 
received much commendation from 
the veterans, the hospital officials, 
and civic leaders. Bert and his 
helpers have developed a junior 
U.S.O. and are bringing some cheer 
into the lives of these oft neglected 
men and women in the hospitals. 
Truly, they deserve a real big hand. 



PORTSMOUTH, YA. 




Irma Koff, Correspondent 



Dear Lonzmen: 

Summer is over, the holidays are 
behind us, and everyone in town is 
buckling clown to work, organiza- 
tional activities, and the fall and 
winter social swing. 

All of the past presidents of the 
Portsmouth chapter of TIadassah 
were honored at the opening meet- 
ing in September. Those who were 
present received beautiful past presi- 
dent's pins. Past presidents, who 
gave so much of their time and ef- 
forts for this worthy cause included 
Mesdames Fanny Rosenthal (now 
deceased); Annie Kootz (now living 
in New York); Bernard Caplan, An- 
na Klein, Fanny Barney, Esther 
Stark, Sarah Gordon, Pauline Ber- 



man, Eleanor Cohen, Ann Floum, 
Bernice Pilzer, Lil Pilzer, Zelma 
Rivin, and Ina Reshefsky. 

The important cause of Youth 
Aliyah will highlight Hadassah's Oc- 
tober meeting with a prominent 
guest speaker scheduled. 

Hadassah delegates to the nation- 
al convention in Washington were 
Mesdames Hyman Kates, Bernard 
Levin, and Joseph Reshefsky. A 
large crowd of the local members al- 
so attended. 

The local subscription drive for 
the Outlook is now underway and so 
far Martin and Arthur Farfel have 
done a grand job. If you haven't 
already done so, send in a check or 

( Please Turn To Page 36 ) 



Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary 

Mrs. Lawrence Schain, Correspondent 



Due to change in plans at prac- 
tically the last minute, we cancelled 
our Camp Pickett visit the night of 
August 18th, arranging to see these 
hospitalized veterans the following 
week. The night of the 18th was 



mos<t enjoyably taken up by our 
visit to the Reliable Furniture Co., 
where Mrs. Lucas, Home Econom- 
ics Consultant, and special Philco 
representative, showed us many in- 
teresting and varied ways of prepar- 




URQUHART'S 
. . BAKERY . . 

Specializing in Holidays, Bar Mitzvah 
Celebrations, Birthday and 
Wedding Cakes 

1513 Colley Ave. Norfolk, Va. 



WW 



WSSWWWWWSWWWSWWSWWWWWWV 



SNOW-WHITE 

• IVORY SOAP LAUNDERERS 

• SANITONE DRY CLEANERS 
VIRGINIA BEACH • NORFOLK, VA. 



JW.WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWV5 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



ing foods on Philco stove, how we 
can best adapt space to more food 
in Philco refrigerators, etc. 

September 1st was the usual first- 
of-the-month good deed by visiting 
the McGuire V.A. Hospital. An ad- 
ditional ward, of arrested tubercular 
patients, was also happy to receive 
the ministrations of our Auxiliary 
Angels. 

We held our first meeting of the 
1953-54 season on the 8th at Beth 
Torah Synagogue. You can imagine 
the hum of voices, as girls greeted 
friends they hadn't seen all summer 



long, comparing (fading) tans, 
learning all the latest gossip, etc. 

A visit to Camp Pickett was 
made September 15th. The men, 
as usual, enjoyed the games, re- 
freshments and prizes and made 
known their appreciation, which al- 
ways makes us feel it was worth- 
while going, after all. 

The executive board met the eve- 
ning of the 22nd at the home of 
Fay (Mrs. Harry) Brod. There 
were many things to discuss, such 
as placing new chairmen in various 
offices, filling gaps left by retiring 
or resigning board members, etc. 



NEWPORT NEWS, YA. 

Mrs. Martha B. Shapiro, Correspondent 



Mr. Theodore H. Beskin, Vir- 
ginia State Chairman of the JWB- 
ASD Committee, has announced 
that through the National Jewish 
Welfare Board's office in Newport 
News, arrangements were made for 
home hospitality for all Jewish 
servicemen stationed at Military In- 
stallations and Veterans Hospitals 
in the Virginia area during the 
High Holy Days. 

High Holy Day arrangements are 
part of JWB's world-wide Rosh 
Hashonah arrangements carried out 
at some 500 Military posts and Vet- 
erans Hospitals in the United 
States and at posts in the Carib- 
bean, Europe and in the Pacific. 
Since 1917, JWB has been the 
agencv authorized by the Armed 
Forces at home and abroad. 
Through it's Division of Religious 
Activities, JWB recruits, ecclesias- 



tically endorses, and services all 
Jewish Chaplains in the Armed 
Forces. It is also currently a mem- 
ber agency of United Service Or- 
ganizations, Inc. (USO). 

JWB Rosh Hashonah arrange- 
ments include shipments of large 
quantities of prayer books, prayer 
shawls, holiday leaflets, shofars, and 
greeting cards to posts and hospitals 
in the United States and overseas. 
The holidays were observed by 
Jewish GI's in Korea as a result of 
arrangements made by JWB for 
emergency shipment of supplies in 
July to military and naval installa- 
tions all along the Pacific Coast. 
These supplies were placed on 
Army transports and ships of the 
Navy and were distributed also at 
all troop concentration points and 
all American installations in the 
Pacific. 



ROANOKE, YA. 



Mrs. Jerome Brum 

Rabbi Tobias Rothenberg con- 
ducted the first Annual Institute of 
Judaism, sponsored by the United 
Synagogue Youth, Seaboard Region, 
at the estate of Mr. I. D. Blumen- 
thal at Wild Acres, N. C. Young 
representatives from Roanoke were 
Judith L a b s o n, Jerry Newman, 
Arnold Masinter, and Shirley Le- 
vine, from Wytheville. 

Rabbi Rothenberg lectured at 
Wild Acres, the B'nai B'rith Insti- 
tute of Judaism from August 5th to 
9th. His topic was the "Ethics of 
Our Fathers." 

Aside from the Rabbi's other nu- 



burg, Correspondent 

merous duties, he has been busy 
writing a sitory of the Roanoke 
Jewish Community, dating from the 
first Jewish citizens in Roanoke, and 
analyses of the trends of Jewish life 
to our present day. Questionnaires 
have been sent to every Jewish fam- 
ily in the community, for pertinent 
information. This interesting com- 
pilation will be greatly apreciated 
by all Roanoke Jewry. 

Mazel tov to Toby and Morris 
Masinter on the Bar Mitzvah of 
their son, Arnold, on July 4th. 
Arnold acted as Rabbi and Cantor 
at Friday night services, and Shab- 



Quickest, Cheapest, Most Con- 
venient Route Between Cities, 
Is Across 

South Norfolk Bridge 

Connecting 
NORFOLK & PORTSMOUTH 

It Will Pay You to Follow 
U. S. 337 Over Our Bridge and 
Save Time, Miles and Money. 



BROWN- 
MORRISON 

COMPANY 
Fine Printing 
Lynchburg, Virginia 
Office Supplies 



The Following Firms in . . . 

NEWPORT NEWS. VA. 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 




STATIONERY COMPANY,^. 



WE CORDIALLY SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 



Citizens Marine Jefferson Bank 

NEWPORT NEWS. VIRGINIA 

Member of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



COMPLETE BANKING SERVICE SINCE 1891 




PHONE 5-1234 



♦ COAL ♦ FUEL OIL ♦ 

Suppliers of Sinclair Products 

NEWPORT NEWS, VA. 



Becks 



ewes. 



Bread 

Baked in 
NEWPORT NEWS, VA. 




PURITAN 
RESTAURANT 

A Good Place To Eat" 

2716 Washington Avenue 
NEWPORT NEWS, VA. 



Happy New Year 

PELTZ 

BROTHERS 



SHIP 
CHANDLERS 

HAMPTON ROADS PORTS 

Newport News, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 



The Lackey-Saunders Co., Inc. 



Real Estate, Rental and 
Insurance Agents 

HAMPTON - - - VIRGINIA 



34 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



The Following Firms in . . . 

ROANOKE, YA. 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 



T T T T T 




A Y F A I 

CAFETER IA 




I 17 West Church Avenue 
ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 

SERVING HOURS 

Sunday thru Friday 

Lunch 11:00-2:15 • 

Dinner 4:30-7:30 

Closed All Day Saturday 



JIMMY TRETTEL 

Manager 



WEDDINGS 

• dial 2-4629 



COMMERCIAL 



NEIL GOOD 

PHOTOGRAPH ER 

413 S. JEFFERSON — ROANOKE, VA. 



Happy New Year 



PONCE DE LEON Restaurant 

PAUL and PETE STAMUS, Operators 

In the HOTEL PONCE DE LEON BLDG. — ROANOKE, VA. 
• An Ideal Meal With Price Appeal • 




• ROOFING 

• WELDING 

• SHEET METAL 
WORK 

VALLEY 

ROOFING CORP. 

1707 South Jefferson 
ROANOKE, VA. 



HAPPY 
NEW YEAR 

from 

ENGLEBY 

ELECTRIC 
COMPANY 

3 1 3 First St., S. W. 
ROANOKE, VA. 



State Brake & Lubrication Co. 

CHARLES L. BENTLEY, Proprietor 
AMOCO PRODUCTS • ROAD SERVICE 
39 Tazewell Avenue S. E. Dial 6977 ROANOKE, VA. 



•:♦> •:♦> ■:♦> •;♦> •:♦> •:♦> 

TRANSFER & STORAGE 

853 CAMP8EU AVE.. S. E. • ROANOKE, VA. 

LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE 
Just Dial 3-2436 — Night 7416 
Call Collect Agent Free Estimates 

NORTH AMERICAN VAN LINES, Inc. 





bos morning, and his brother Mi- 
chael assisted him by reading the 
Musas Service. A lovely reception 
followed. 

Mazel tov also to Vivian Silver- 
man, her parents Sarah and David 
Silverman, and grandparents Mr. 
and Mrs. Jacob Brenner — and Ju- 
dith Shapiro, her parents Bernice 
and Julius Shapiro, and grandpar- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Shapiro 
.... who were Bas Mitzvahed on 
May 29. These children have 
worked diligently, and were truly an 
inspiration in this beautiful service. 

Mazel tov to the Confirmands: 
Jay Michael Becker, Sarah Louise 
Fischer, Judith Labson, Jerry New- 
man, Miriam, and Barbara Bern- 
stein. 

The congregation of Beth Israel 
is building a lovely new Colonial 
style h o m e for Rabbi and Mrs. 
Rothenberg and their family. In 
one of Roanoke's loveliest residen- 
tial sections, the home should be 
completed in several more months. 
Mr. Julius Fischer and Mr. Ned 
Schlossberg were Co-Chairmen in 
charge of the building arrangements. 
At Temple Emanuel: 

Temple Emanuel is happy to 
welcome their new spiritual leader, 
Rabbi Samuel R. Shillman and Mrs. 
Shillman to Roanoke. Rabbi Shill- 
man leaves the pulpit at the Anshe 
Chesed Congregation in Vicksburg, 
Mississippi, where he served as Rab- 
bi since 1948. Prior to this, he had 
been in Sumter, S. C, for 18 years. 
Rabbi and Mrs. Shillman have one 
son, David, who has just graduated 
from the Philip Exeter School with 
honors. He is now in Europe on a 
fellowship, living with a family in 
Greece. David will enter Harvard 
Law School in the fall, having won 
a scholarship. Rabbi Shillman will 
begin his duties here in September, 
and we will all be happy to wel- 
come Rabbi and Mrs. Shillman to 
our community. 

Congratulations to the three Jef- 



KENNARD 



i 



i PACE CO. | 

\ Kitchen Specialist j 

| PLUMBING AND HEATING { 
j 129 Kirk Ave., W. Roanoke, Va. j 

iflllllllllilllllllllllliliillllllllllllllilllllll^ 

I EASTER I 

| SUPPLY CO. 1 

H Bank and Office Equipment = 
E and Supplies = 

1 ROANOKE 7, VA. | 

nllllllllllllllillilMIililllllllllllllllllllllllf? 



ferson High School graduates, Miss 
Nancy Schlossberg, Miss Gayle Ru- 
benstein, and Miss Constance Mil- 
ler. 

Miss Gayle Rubenstein delivered 
one of the graduation speeches and 
has been an honor student and very 
active in her school affairs. Miss 
Rubenstein has received a scholar- 
ship to Brandeis University, and 
will enter the University in the fall. 

Mazel tov to the new parents, 
Tobee and Bobby Rosenberg, new 
daughter, Lyn-Ellen. Dora and 
Ralph Katz, baby daughter. Mr. 
and Mrs. Morris Lepchitz, from 
Radford, a son. 

Special Mazel tov to Mr. and 
Mrs. Abe Totz on the birth of their 
second great-grandchild. Their 
grandchildren, Mr. and Mrs. Ed- 
ward Feinman, of Lynchburg, are 
the proud parents of a son, Edward 
Ronald, Jr. 

A most enjoyable Saturday night 
dance at the Green Hill Country 
Club, including a Treasure Hunt 
and late Box supper was a fine af- 
fair. 

There have been so many visitors 
here this summer, cannot possibly 
mention all, but here are a few . . . 
George Gordin, from Washington, 
has spent several days with his sis- 
ter and brother-in-law, Caryl and 
Art Solomon . . . Miss Frances 
Kohen, visiting her family, Elsie 
and Joe Cohn .... Mr. Henry Stark 
and son Alvin stayed three weeks 
with his sister and brother-in-law, 
Fannie and Jake Brumberg .... 
Gerne and Danny Klawansky and 
young daughters, from Wilmington, 
Del., spending the week with their 
aunt and uncle, Mary and Sol Sil- 
verman 

There was a Hadassah Board 
Meeting held at the home of Toby 
Masinter, to formulate plans for the 
coming year. 

Condolences to the Bachrach 
family on the death of Mr. Ray- 
mond Grau, of New York City. 




KILLINGER'S 
LINOLEUM 

and CARPET CO. 

Floor Covering Contractors 
ROANOKE, VA. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



35 



A NEW YEAR MESSAGE 

From RABBI JULES LIPSCHUTZ, Temple Beth Israel, Richmond 



It is my personal joy and delight 
to convey Rosh Hashanah greetings 
again this year to the American Jew- 
ish Times Outlook. May your pages 
of journalism continue to radicate 
the warmth of Torah in the interests 
of God, country and democracy. As 
Rosh Hashanah is the birthday of 
the world, may a disciplined hu- 
manity learn to hold sacred the 
daily principles of morality, human 
decency and benevolence. The lit- 
urgical prayers of the High Holy 
Days will focus a tender plea of 
universalism for permanent peace. 
In an analysis of the theme, "Free- 
dom of Choice or Freedom of Will," 
the question usually presents itself. 
Can man combat sin? Yes. It is 
recorded within the Talmud . . . 
Sota . . . 3-A ... "A man does not 
sin unless the evil spirit of folly 
possesses him." Socrates said . . . 
"Know thyself," and the precepts 
of our Torah have already said in 




This is the latest addition 
to our fleet of white ambulances. 

Like all of our ambulances, 
it has the latest in oxygen ther- 
apy equipment, available for im- 
mediate service to our patrons. 

It is manned by experienced 
men with competent training in 
first aid . . . men who know what 
not to do as well as what to do. 



OAKEY 

Ambulance Service 
Phone 6283 




ROANOKE, VA. 



Happy New Year 

MAGIC CITY 
MOTOR CORP. 

FORD CARS and TRUCKS 
ROANOKE, VA. 



H. C. BAKER 
SALES CO. 

Distributors of 
Radio Parts and Sound 
Equipment 
JOHNS-MANVILLE 
Blown Rock Wool Insulation 
19 Franklin Rd. Roanoke, Va. 



time of antiquity . . . "Master Thy- 
self." Man is endowed with reason 
and intellect, and for this reason 
he is blessed with understanding. In 
our moments of moral inventory 
and spiritual introspection in the 
month of Tishre, it is well for so- 




RABBI JULES LIPSCHUTZ 

ciety at large to recall a key thought, 
true and certainly undeniable . . . 
namely, that the happiness of one's 
life depends on the quality of one's 
thoughts; therefore let us guard 
them accordingly. It is better to go 
hungry with a pure mind than to 
cat with an evil one. May the com- 
ing year of 5714 bring to us and all 
of mankind the realization of our 
fondest dreams, and may we be 
blessed with life, health, happiness 
and a lasting peace. 



DANVILLE, VA. 

On the evening of August 13th 
the congregation of Aetz Chayim 
Synagogue gave a farewell banquet 
at the Schule in honor of Rabbi and 
Mrs. Nathan Bulman. 

Rabbi Bulman came to our Syna- 
gogue directly from Yeshiva Univer- 
sity in New York City where he was 
one of its most outstanding gradu- 
ates in recent history. His scholar- 
ship was recognized by some of the 
foremost Rabbonim of this country 
including Dr. Samuel Belkin, presi- 
dent of Yeshiva University and 
Rabbi Abraham Jaffe, president of 
Beth Joseph Yeshiva. His zeal, pro- 
found knowledge of all facets of our 
faith, eloquence and sincerity en- 
abled him to imbue the community 
with a revitalized Jewish spirit. 

Rabbi Bulman is unique in that 
he is linked with the great Euro- 
pean rabbis even though he was 
born in New York City. His father 
was a disciple of the Rabbi of Ger, 
and it was in the atmosphere of a 
(Please Turn To Page 41) 



UIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIlllllllllllllllllllllllHlllillllllltlHilllllSi 

from the 




wem * 




SUNNYSIDE 

AWNING & TENT CO. 

F. JORDON TEMPLE, Manager 

"Sunnyside Means Quality" 

VENETIAN BLINDS • WINDOW SHADES 
STORM WINDOWS • AWNINGS 
ORNAMENTAL IRON 



621 First Street, Southwest 



Roanoke 10, Virginia 



l!llllllEil!:iilllllllli::i3IIMIIIIIillllllllllllinMIIIIIIIISIIIIII!llllllllllllllllllllilllllillllllllll 

Quality If o<u Gaa petite 




/y^^ROANOKE'S 
^MOST MODERN DAIRY 



Holiday Greetings from . . . 

ROANOKE 

BEER & WINE DISTRIBUTORS 
ASSOCIATION 

Roanoke • '• • Virginia 



ANDREWS OIL CO. 



Fuel Oil j 

§.., 

Distributors 



ROANOKE, VA. 



DIAL 

3-2831 



A Happy and Prosperous New Year 

MICK - OR - MACK STORES 

Are the Fine Food Stores 
in Roanoke 



36 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



The Following Firms in . . . 

LYNCHBURG, YA. 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 




VIRGINIA GREENSTONE CO. 



Quarriers and Finishers of "VIRGINIA GREENSTONE" 
LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

Architectural and Industrial Stone 

"YOU CANNOT SLIP ON VIRGINIA GREENSTONE" 



NEW YEAR GREETINGS . . . 
from 

• Lynchburg's Most Centrally Located Hotel 
Excellent Meals in Our Main Dining Room 

HOTEL 

CARROLL 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

W. W. LYNN, Jr., Proprietor 




New Year 
Greetings 

from 



J ™ B 



DISTRIBUTING 

COMPANY 



HOLIDAY GREETINGS 



• • • 



L. E. 
LICHFORD 

Wholesale Groceries 
and Produce 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



Lynchburg, Va. 

Distributors 

• Miller's High Life 

• Guirrher's 

BEER 



New Year Greetings 

WILLS-CAMP CO. 

819 Main Street 
LYNCHBURG, VA. 

• The Men's Store 

• For Over 50 Years 




Mrs. Allen Wasserman, the former Miss Anita Kerpelman, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Arthur Z. Kerpelman of Suffolk, Va., whose marriage to Mr. Allen Was- 
serman of New Haven, Connecticut, took place on Sunday, June 27th at 6:30 
P. M. at the Suburban Country Club in Portsmouth, Va. 

PORTSMOUTH, VA. 

(Concluded From Page 32) 



money order for $2 to the Ameri- 
can Jewish Times-Outlook, P. O. 
Box 701, Richmond Va. You won't 
want to miss an issue of this out- 
standing magazine. 

Installation of officers for the 
Portsmouth district of ZOA will 
take place at the October meeting 
as unforeseen circumstance forced 
postponement of this event set for 
the September meeting. A promi- 
nent speaker is on tap for the eve- 
ning and entertainment will also be 
provided. 

Bernard Levin, ZOA president, 
and Miss Sara Kramer, local treas- 
urer, attended the national conven- 
tion in New York in August. 

Mazel Tov to Miss Doris Sue 
Cramer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Mac Cramer, who was married on 
August 30 to Lee Silverstein of 
Cambridge, Mass. 



Our sincere svmpathy to the fam- 
ily of the late Mrs. Marv Weiner 
Bartley. 

A room was dedicated recently in 
the Beth Sholom Home for the 
Aged in Richmond in memory of 
Iris Chernack, by her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Michael Chernack. A fit- 
ting tribute to one who gave much 
of herself to Jewish causes. 

B'nai B'rith Men and Women 
will feature Americanism at their 
October meeting when winning es- 
says of school pupils will be read. 

A novel and entertaining program 
is being planned by Sisterhood for 
their October meeting. 

Anyone having news they would 
like to go into this magazine please 
contact me at The Portsmouth Star. 

That's 30 for now. 

Your friend, 
Irma 



i 



I 



Season's Greetings 

CHAS. E. BURG 
Florist 

"Flowers of Distinction" 
LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 
and 

FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA 



• VIRGINIA 
• LAUNDRY 
• COMPANY 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



HARRIS 

CARRIAGE 
COMPANY 

• WRECKED CARS 

• BODIES 

• FENDERS 

Made Like New 

1408 Main Street 
LYNCHBURG, VA. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



3,? 



BEAUTY AND THE SYNAGOGUE 

By DR. ALFRED WERNER 



The Nazi maelstrom leveled near- 
ly all of this historic synagogues of 
Europe, and it was just short of a 
miracle that a few great edifices such 
as the Spanish and Portuguese Syna- 
gogue of Amsterdam, the Altneu- 
schul of Prague, or the Scuola Spag- 
nuola of Venice emerged from the 
last war unscathed. 

In this country, not a single house 
of worship has ever been touched by 
power-drunk troops. Synagogues are 
razed in American cities, but only 
because the Elders have decided that 
the old building either no longer fits 
the purposes of the congregation, 
or no longer satisfies the aesthetic 
needs of the new generation of wor- 
shippers. 

Though thev may have cost a for- 
tune, many of the temples built 
here before the first World War 
were nothing but poor imitation 
Moorish, Romanesque, or Gothic. 
In this period, as the educator Par- 
rington wrote, good taste reached its 
lowest ebb; it was an era of "chromo 
civilization" in which the dignified 
culture of the 18th century gave 
way to a loud and garish eclecticism. 
We can still enjoy the simple and 
graceful structure of the Sephardic 
svnagogue of Newport', Rhode 
Island, which is in perfect harmony 
with the Georgian architecture of 
the historic town, but 20th century 
American Jews are finding it in- 
creasingly difficult to tolerate tem- 
ples the facades of which, all Stars 
of David notwithstanding, look eith- 
er like Oriental palaces and mosques, 
or like medieval cathedrals. 

But need the Jew be concerned 
about the outer appearance of his 
synagogue? The answer is: "Yes- — 
as much as he is concerned about his 
own appearance and that of his fam- 
ily upon entering the house of wor- 
ship". While it is true that religious 
fervor filled the "shul" where our 
grandparents prayed, even though it 
may have been a dark and dismal 
building on a neglected sidestreet, 
it does not follow that the grand- 
children, living in the freedom of 
contemporary America, must con- 
tinue the tradition of pogrom-ridden 
Russia, Rumania and Poland. As a 



matter of fact, the Talmud inter- 
prets the Biblical phrase, "This is 
mv God and I will adorn him", as 
a demand that every religious ob- 
ject should be as attractive as possi- 
ble. The 14th century Spanish-Jew- 
ish thinker, Profiat Duran, exhorted 
his coreligionists as follows: "The 
House of Learning should be beauti- 
ful and pleasing in structure. This 
increases the desire for learning, and 
strengthens the memory because the 
viewing of pleasing forms and beau- 
tiful reliefs and drawings rejoices the 
heart and strengthens the mind". 

But what should our new temple 
look like? many officers of congre- 
gations have asked, anxiously, while 
studving sketches and blueprints. 
It must not look like a church — but 
it should not resemble a high school, 
a ranch, or a garage, either! It 
should be "modern" — but not "too 
modern", since it must not shock 
the older and more conservative 
members. 

But it should not be difficult to 
find the right formula if one heeds 
the aesthetic creed of the outstand- 
ing vanguard architect, Dankmar 
Adler, "Form follows function". 
Adler, the son of a German rabbi, 
designed many theaters, hotels, ex- 
hibition halls, as well as synagogues 
in the Midwest during the 'eighties 
and 'nineties. It was he who stressed 
the need that a building be above 
all utilitarian. 

In other words, a synagogue 
should be — a synagogue. But what 
is a synagogue? It is, primarily, a 
House of Assembly, which is the 
meaning of both the Hebrew "beth 
ha-knesseth", and the Greek "syna- 
goge". It must meet the needs — re- 
ligious, educational, and social — of 
the congregation. Perhaps it is easi- 
er to define its character by stating 
what it is not — it is not a church! 
The Christian, seeking the Infinite, 
wants his house of worship to point 
up to heaven; hence, the prepond- 
erance of vertical features: tall, nar- 
row windows, high vaults, and awe- 
inspiring towers. Synagogues, how- 
ever, should extend horizontally, 
since they have always been commu- 
nity centers and rallying points for 



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Dealers for TWO GREAT CARS 



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NEW YEAR GREETINGS 

C. W. HANCOCK & SONS 

General Building Contractors 

LYNCHBURGH - VIRGINIA 



The 

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and 

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VIRGINIA'S 
OLDEST 
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Contractors for 
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General Repair Work 
Telephone 537 2308 Twelfth St. Lynchburg, Va. 



38 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



The Following Firms in . . . 

CHARLOTTESVILLE-FREDERICKSBURG, YA. 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 



WESTINGHOUSE 

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$229.95 



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• ADVANCE CASCODE TUNER Gives 100 Mile-Plus Reception 

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"Charlottesville's Most Complete Appliance Center" 
227 W. Main St. Dial 3-3232 

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA. 




'em 

Greetings and Best Wishes 




from 



The CHARLOTTESVILLE AUTO 
and TRUCK DEALERS ASS N. 

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA 



the dispersed, and, to fulfill their 
secular functions, need large and 
well-lighted premises to include lec- 
ture halls, libraries, gymnasiums, 
workshops, and playrooms. Typical 
of the old synagogue in Europe was 
the Schulhof — the yard where a 
ceremony like the Blessing of the 
Moon took place, and where wed- 
dings could be performed. In the 
America of todav, the functions of 

J 7 

the Schulhof are being served by 
large, well-tended gardens where the 
congregants can gather before or 
after services and classes, and where 
the "booth" for the Feast of Taber- 
nacles may stand. 

The architect should know, or 
should be informed by the rabbi 
that a synagogue, to be a Jewish 
house of worship, must not be over- 
whelminglv impressive, neither the- 
atrical nor overpowering. Whereas 
a church is meant to be a monu- 
ment to the glory of God, the syna- 
gogue never aims to be a work of 
"art for religion's sake." This prin- 
ciple was often conveniently forgot- 
ten when well established large con- 
gregations, proud of their impor- 
tance and wealth, commissioned the 
architects to produce "showpieces", 
with huge portals, cupolas, col- 
umened porticos, and what not. 
Modesty does not exclude beauty — 
that kind of modesty which can be 
traced to the Hebrew sense of hu- 
mility before God. Congregations 
planning to squander millions in 
order to erect huge and lush build- 
ings should remember that the Lord 
did not reveal himself to Moses 
from a tall, majestic tree, but a small 
burning bush, and that the Deca- 
logue was given, not on one of the 
great mountain peaks, but on the 
relatively small Mount Sinai. 

There is a deep symbolic truth 
in these rabbinic parables which, 
if applied to synagogue architec- 
ture, make it Hebraic, modern, 
and, incidentally, in keeping with 
the American tradition which also 



favors simple and austere fac- 
ades. For obvious reasons, a happy 
synthesis of exterior and interior 
was not found in Europe. When I 
visited the Ghetto of Venice, I was 
astonished by the contrast between 
the plain and almost ugly outside 
appearance of the Scuola Spagnuola, 
and its lavish, perhaps too lavish 
baroque interior, the work of the 
celebrated Christian architect, Long- 
hena. The Jews of Europe had very 
good reasons for making their houses 
or worship look as unassuming as 
possible; in addition, in many places 
they were forbidden buildings high- 
er than the local churches or 
mosques, and in some instances 
were compelled to build their syna- 
gogues below ground level. 

In free America there are no re- 
strictions for Jews, or for other non- 
Christian religious groups. We can 
build in peace and security our 
houses of worship wherever we want 
to, and in whatever style we choose. 
We are guided only by our good 
taste — or by the lack of it. Fortu- 
natelv, the number of synagogues 
that are just big cathedrals without 
crucifixes is rapidly decreasing. New 
York City and the neighboring 
towns are, of course, leading the 
movement towards streamlined new 
synagogues, but many congregations 
in the Midwest and West have been 
open to the spell of modernism, too. 
Young rabbis and members of con- 
gregations, Reform, Conservative, or 
Orthodox, are willing to be led by 
such first-rate architects as Erich 
Mendelsohn and Percival Goodman 
who have designed a number of fine 
functional synagogues — Mendel 
sohn large and beautiful temples in 
Cleveland and St. Louis, Goodman 
the buildings for B'nai B'rith at 
Millburn, New Jersey, and Beth El 
at Springfield, Massachusetts. 

There is, of course, no such thing 
as a "Jewish style", for obvious his- 
toric and sociological reasons, and 
attempt to create one artificiially 



THE 
» • 



• C K 



RESTAURANT 



JAMES STRATOS, Manager 
I 18 E. Main St. 
CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA. 
'Food and Atmosphere Par Excellence' 



Happy New Year ♦ ♦ ♦ 

THE DAILY PROGRESS 

Over One-Half Century of Public Service 
CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



3S 




Additional tunds for the B'nai b'rith Swimming Pool for Paraplegics at the Chaim 
and Vera Weizmann Rehabilitation Center at the Tel Hashomer Hosptal in Tel 
Aviv were presented by former President Frank Goldman to Mrs. Vera Weizmann, 
widow of the late president of Israel, at a luncheon given by Mr. Goldman in her 
honor at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. Work on the center buildings to be equipped 
by B'nai B'rith was started last Fall, Mrs. Weizmann announced. Machines, tools 
and equipment for the Workshops for Disabled Veterans of the Israel Army and 
the Training School for physiotherapists were purchased in this country by B'nai 
B'rith and shipped to Israel, under the direction of the Aid to Israel Department of 
the Order. 



must end in dismal failure. But 
there is such a thing as a Jewish 
philosophy, a Jewish way of life. 
The painter, Moritz Oppenheim, 
expressed it very aptly when visiting 
Rome, more than a century ago. 
The pomp of St. Peter's Cathedral 
impressed him as a theatrical exhi- 
bition calculated for its effect, in 
contrast to the democratic unpre- 
tentiousness and proud simplicity of 
the Jewish synagogues which, by 
comparison, seemed "magnificent" 
to him. 

Post-war architecture in this coun- 
try is imbued with the democratic 
spirit of Oppenheim's words. Mod- 
ern America rejects such atrocities 
Greek temples, or industrial research 
laboratories built with Doric col- 
umns. 

Hence, our synagogue builders 
have not to go for inspiration to 
Hagia Sophia of Istanbul, or to the 
old California Missions. But archi- 
tects are human beings who give 
what is demanded of them, what- 



ever their artistic tenets. Their best 
intentions can easily thwarted by 
the timidity or ignorance of a con- 
gregation. There is need for edu- 
cating our rabbis and laymen alike, 
need for explaining to them why 
stylistic throwbacks ars less likely 
than more abstract, more utilitarian 
buildings to express the spirituality 
of our time — incidentally, tradition- 
al synagogues are more expensive 
than modern ones. Our people must 
learn that, whether facade or in- 
terior, ornaments should be used 
only where absolutely needed; that 
there is a dignity that stems from 
simplicity, and that there should 
always exist a close bond between 
building and natural enironment. 

Fortunately, we are eager to learn, 
and quick to grasp the essentials. 
We will be glad to exchange false 
stylistic trends for honest architec- 
tural expression, and the confusion 
caused by eclecticism, for good and 
clear design, bound to enhance the 
serene beauty of a genuine beth ha- 
knesseth. 



ji 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 ■ 1 1 ■■ ii 1 1 1 1 6 6 A.RNETTE ' S" 1,1 11,1 m ^ 

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= Home of Good Food and Delicious Ice Cream 

| BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER 

| 1211 Boulevard, U. S. 1 and 301— Colonial Heights, Petersburg, Va. 

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|t i ii 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 ii ii in i ii 1 1 1 1 1 iiimiii 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 tii 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 § 1 1 1 ii i ii hi 1 1 in 1 1 1 ti in i ii 1 1 1 1 1 in 1 1 1 ■ ii mie 

Ki. 9-1265 Est. 1860 

JAMES HENRY BEACH and SONS 

Sheet Metal Work 

Composition, Shingle, Slag and Slate Roofing 
210 KING STREET ALEXANDRIA, VA. 
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= £ 



Neighborhood Theatres 

Inc. 




WATCH FOR "THE JUGGLER" SOON AT 

JEFFERSON THEATER 

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA 



The MONTICELLO HOTEL 

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA 
"Home of Jeffersonian Hospitality" 

T. W. ETHERIDGE, Manager 



CHEVROLET COMPANY 

FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 

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Paris and Accessories 



Wholesale and Retail 



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Phone 608- 624- 1492 



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Fredericksburg, Va. 
GENERAL MOTORS TRUCKS j 

New Location : Jefferson Davis Highway 

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40 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



The Following Firms in . . . 

STAUNTON - WAYNESBORO, YA. 

... Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 



INGLESIDE 

HOTEL MOTEL and 
COUNTRY CLUB 

ON U. S. ROUTE 1 1— JUST NORTH OF 
STAUNTON, VA. 

Where the Fairways Meet the Mountains" 

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OF STAUNTON, VA. 

• COMPLETE BANKING FACILITIES 




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INC. 

"EUREKA BRAND" 
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Greetings and Best Wishes 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 




Organized 1905 



WAYNESBORO, VIRGINIA 



MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



A Year of the McCarran-Walter Act 

By PHILIP BAUM 

During the year 5713, the controversial and discriminatory McCarran- Walter 
Act has been governing the nation's immigration policy and procedure. In this 
feature article, Mr. Baum analyzes the provisions of the law and explains its 
many inequities.— THE EDITOR. 



A little over a year ago, liberal 
civic agencies by the narrow margin 
of three votes in the Senate lost 
their bitter fight to sustain then 
President Truman's veto of the 
McCarran-Walter Immigration Act. 
As a result, since December, 1952, 
when the new law took effect, we 
have been living under an immigra- 
tion measure that has subverted our 
prestige abroad and imperilled the 
security and standing of aliens and 
naturalized citizens at home. 

T he bill was passed in June, 1952, 
to take effect December 24, 1952. 
In September, months « before the 
law was to become operative, Jewish 
organizations received word that the 
Visa Division of the State Depart- 
ment had concluded that the Mc- 
Carran-Walter measure for the first 
time would require prospective im- 
migrants to furnish information re- 
garding their "ethnic" classification 
and that this provision would re- 
quire the listing of Jewish visa ap- 
plicants as a "special group." There 
was not the slightest intimation that 
such data had any relevant or legiti- 
mate connection with the issuance 
of entry documents. On the other 
hand, the dangers implicit in the 
official inquiry into religious or 
"ethnic" affiliation were obvious. As 
Rabbi Israel Goldstein, President of 
the American Jewish Congress, re- 
minded the State Department: "The 
risk of possible perversion of infor- 
mation of this kind for the appease- 
ment of bias and prejudice is no less 
great in the field of immigration 
than in the fields of employment 
and education where it consistently 
has been depreciated or forbidden 
by the Federal Civil Service Com- 
mission, the President's Commis- 
sion on Higher Education and the 




MONTICELLO 

DAIRY j 

25-123 | 

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA. I 



President's Committee on Civil 
Rights." 

Jewish Community Aroused 

Only after condemnation of this 
requirement by an aroused Jewish 
community did the Department of 
State ultimately rule that "ethnic 
affiliation" as used in the immigra- 
tion laws would not be construed 
as referring to religious attachment 
and that Jewish visa applicants 
would not, therefore, be subjected 
to interrogation about their Jewish 
background. 

The cynicism of the McCarran- 
Walter Act is underscored by its 
so-called screening provisions, sup- 
posedly drawn to protect us against 
infiltration by subversives. This end 
is hardly achieved by its current 
interpretation which flatly excludes 
ex-Communists but permits the free 
and unimpeded entry of ex-Nazis 
and ex-Fascists. Unlike earlier laws, 
the McCarran-Walter Act limits the 
definition of excludable "totali- 
tarian" groups to those which have 
urged the creation of a totalitarian 
government "in the United States." 
By invoking the astounding theory 
that the Nazi parties and the Fascist 
parties confined their aggressions 
solely within their own national bor- 
ders or within the continent of Eu- 
rope, immigration authorities in 
practice have been able to avoid 
classification of these groups as "to- 
talitarians." 

On the other hand, some persons 
have been excluded with even 
greater rigor than before. But the 
nature of the excluded classes only 
highlights the imperious character 
of the new law. Under the pre- 
McCarran-Walter law, exclusion be- 
cause of a criminal record could oc- 
cur only following conviction of a 
(Please Turn To Page 79) 

niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin.il 

Season's Greetings 

SWANSON 
MOTORS 

Incorporated 



I 15 N. Market Street 
DANVILLE, VIRGINIA 



Sales - Service 
® OLDSMOBILE 
m CADILLAC 
I'liiiiiiiiiimiimiiiiimiiiiiiimiimiiin 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



DANVILLE, YA. 

(Concluded From Page 35) 



Aetz Chayim Synagogue News 
Schule in New York where "Tal- 
midim Chachamim" who had also 
been students of the Rabbi of Ger 
congregated, that Rabbi Bulman re- 
ceived his deep love of Torah. Later, 
he so immersed himself in the lives 
and teachings of the great Jewish 
scholars that those who knew him 
felt that he had an actual intimacy, 
rarely equaled, with such figures as 
Yehuda Halevy, Maimonides, the 
Wilna Gaon, the Chasam Sofer and 
many, many others, as well as a 
thorough grasp of contemporary 
non-Jewish and Jewish scholars. 

It was in the tradition of the great 
leaders of the past that he used 
every available moment for teaching 
and study. Our men gathered at his 
home every Monday evening to 
study Chumosh with Rashi. On 
Tuesday afternoons he taught the 
women laws and customs. Study 
Group for all adults met every 
Wednesady evening. On Shabbos 
mornings after services a group gath- 
ered around his Kiddush table to 
hear him teach Torah. On Sunday 
mornings the men were with their 
rabbi for prayer, then breakfast, then 
a discussion of contemporarv prob- 
lems. He so imbued us with a de- 
sire to learn that even on the nights 
when there were no scheduled 
classes, his home was filled with 
those seeking knowledge. 

His influence reestablished daily 
morning and evening "minyonim," 
which were well attended. As evi- 
dence of a full and consecrated Jew- 
ish life a "mikvah" was built and 
last year nine families erected "suc- 
cohs." 

In addition to teaching the adults 
and carrying out the many functions 
of a rabbi, he taught each of our 



children personally and was loved 
by them. 

Rabbi Bulman was recalled to Ye- 
shiva University, the largest Yeshiva 
in the country, to serve in the ad- 
ministrative department as adviser 
to the students of Yeshiva College. 

We feel confident that with the 
example of Rabbi Bulman before 
them these students will bring to 
American Jewry a vigorous and 
meaningful Judaism. 

The Helping Hand Society held 
a picnic this month at Ballou Park. 

We, of Danville, wish all a very 
Happv, Healthv and Peaceful New 
Year. ' 




Dr. Jerome L. Leon of New York has 
been appointed Medical Director and 
Superintendent of the 49-year-old, free, 
national, inter-racial and non-sectarian 
Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society's 
Denver Hospital and Sanatorium. Dr. 
Leon has served the Department of 
Hospitals of New York City as Deputy 
Medical Superintendent at Seaview 
Hospital, municipal tuberculosis sana- 
torium; at Queens General Hospital 
Center; and as Medical Superintendent 
of Riverside Hospital. 

Do It Now! Buy That 
Israel Bond! 




mm 



from the 




J. C. McFALL'S 

DRUG and SEED STORE 

108 N. UNION ST. 
Phone 5 > • Danville, Va. 

55 Years of Service 



The F ollowing Firms Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 

DANVILLE, YA. 



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Danville's Largest & Finest Taxi Fleet 
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60th 
Anniversary 



SIXTY YEARS 
OF SERVICE 
IN DANVILLE 



F. W. TOWNES & SON, INC. 



FUNERAL HOME 



FRED W. TOWNES, JR. 
J. BLAIR KERNS 



635 Main Street 
DANVILLE, VIRGINIA 



MACK-ELLIS CO. 

CLEANERS AND DYERS „ 



PHONE 436 
217 Main Street 
DANVILLE, VA. 



CLEMENTS 
and PARKER 

Home Furnishers 
Decorafors 
FLOOR COVERINGS 

FRIGIDAIRES 
Danville Hotel Bldg. 



42 



The Following Firms in . . . 

JSVILLE - STANIEYTOWN, YA. 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 




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Greetings From 




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Broker # Stocks 

Martinsville, Virginia 



Bonds 



Rives 
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Ralph 



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Brown, Jr. 
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Our Best Wishes for a Happy New Year 

RICH OIL SALES, Inc. 



GULF GAS & OIL 
DISTRIBUTORS 



MARTINSVILLE, 
VIRGINIA 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 

MARTINSVILLE, VA. 




Mrs. Ralph Hollander, Correspondent 





| 



MRS. MARTIN BERTMAN 



Miss Rhona Betty Weinstein, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan 
Weinstein, Bassett, Va., was mar- 
ried August 9th to Mr. Martin Bert- 
man of Camden, N. J. Rabbi Roth- 
enberg of Roanoke performed the 
ceremony at 4:00 P.M. in the Grand 
Ball Room of the Hotel Roanoke. 
The altar was banked with palms 
ferns and baskets of white flowers 
and the couple stood under a palm 
canopy. 

Given in marriage by her father, 
the bride wore a gown of ivory satin 
with imported French lace and illu- 
sion neckline. Her fingertip veil of 
illusion fell from a trelle and satin 
Juliet cap, edged with notching seed 
pearls. She carried a cascade of 
bride's rose stephanotic and Fleur 
D'Amour centered with a white 
orchid. 

Mrs. Herman Obstler, sister of 
the bride, was the matron of honor. 



She wore a waltz length gown of 
champagne starched chiffon with 
torquoise tucked top and buffant 
skirt. 

Mrs. John Bertman was the other 
honored attendant. She wore a 
gown in blue chiffon, fashioned aft- 
er that of the matron of honor. 
They both carried cascade bouquets 
of blue net and brandywine roses 
with matching styles. 

Flower girl was Sheila Nareen 
Scheinin, cousin of the bride. She 
wore an orchid net gown over taf- 
feta with matching head piece. She 
carried a nosegay of orchid net and 
brandywine roses with orchid 
streams. 

John Bertman, brother of t h e 
groom, served as best man and ush- 
ers were Irving Weinstein, brother 
of the bride, Herman Obstler of 
Bassett, Sam Plevinsky, William 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



43 



Kushner of Camden and Benjamin 
Franklin of Perth Amboy, N. J. 

The bride's mother wore a gown 
of peach cotton lace, cocktail length 
with orchid corsage. The mother of 
the groom wore a similar gown in 
bine with orchid corsage. 

Immediately following the cere- 
monv the bride's parents enter- 



tained with a dinner and reception, 
also at the Hotel Roanoke. After 
a Northern wedding trip, the con- 
pie will reside in Camden, N. J. 

The bride is a graduate of Drexel 
University in Philadelphia and the 
groom is attending Temple Uni- 
versity also in Philadelphia. 



FIGHTING THE NAZI LEGACY 

By NEHEMIAH ROBINSON 

In this article, Nehemiah Robinson, who has developed the Institute of Jewish 
Affairs of the World Jewish Congress into one of the finest centers of Jewish 
research, discusses the pervasiveness of the Nazi legacy of hatred and anti-Semit- 
ism. He presents here a keen analysis of trends in international anti-Semitism 
and the efforts to check its growth and spread. — THE EDITOR. 



It has now become a truism to 
describe the Nazi era as the most 
tragic period in the history of Euro- 
pean Jewrv. Never before was so 
savage a policy applied to so great 
a number of people. It would seem 
that the horrendous dimensions of 
the blood bath indulged in by the 
Nazis would have produced in man- 
kind an utter revulsion against all 
forms of anti-Semitism. And, in- 
deed, at the war's end there was 
some belief that Nazi teachings and 
efforts to stir up global anti-Jewish 
sentiments and actions would col- 
lapse along with the destruction of 
the Third Reich and the other Fas- 
cist regimes. But these expectations 
have proven unfounded. 

Anti-Semitism, it must be con- 
ceded, is still rife throughout the 
world and hardly less pronounced 
than before the advent of Nazism, 
although it mav have assumed some- 
what less virulent forms. The rea- 
sons for the "change" lie less in def- 
erence to the memorv of the six 
million dead, than in the decrease 
or elimination of Jewish populations 
in areas where violent anti-Semitism 

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once raged. It is a sobering fact and 
a discouraging reflection on current 
world morality that Nazi propa- 
ganda continues to have a pervasive 
effect in countries where anti-Semi- 
tism was virtuallv unknown before 
the last war. 

The Allies were fully aware of the 
menace of Nazi racial teachings. 
That is why they fought not only 
on the battlefields but also in the 
arena of propaganda. Th;e Allies 
continuously warned that Nazi mis- 
deeds would be punished after vic- 
tory and intimated that the Nazi's 
anti-Jewish economic measures 
would be overthrown. There was 
general agreement that the new 
world should be founded on the 
principles of equality and human 
rights. The United Nations was es- 
tablished as the instrument through 
which these lofty ideals were to be 
attained. For the first time in his- 
tory, an international covenant of 
this nature had put so great a stress 
on equality, human rights and free- 
dom. Another unique feature of the 
United Nations, one not to be found 
in the defunct League of Nations, 
and which augured well for the ef- 
efectiveness of the UN in combat- 
tin racial and religious discrimina- 
tion, was the fact that the popula- 
tions of the world were invited to 
participate in the work of those UN 
bodies charged with drafting the 
law regarding human rights and fun- 
damental freedoms. This aim was 
to be achieved by means of con- 
sultative arrangements between non- 
governmental organizations and the 
UN Economic and Social Council 
and its subsidiary bodies, including 
the Commission on Human Rights. 

The World Jewish Congress 
seized the opportunity afforded by 
these arrangements and became the 
first Jewish organization to be rec- 
ognized as a spokesman of Jewish 
groups before the competent bodies 
of the UN. 

While the WJC has viewed its 
(Please Turn To Page 68) 




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MARTINSVILLE, VA. 




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Friend and Advisor 
Since 1908 



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44 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 





_ of Me 

LflKOLINAS 





WILMINGTON, N. C. 

Mrs. Celia Golden, Correspondent 

Miss Zalma Brower, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Brower, of Wil- 
mington, has announced her en- 
gagement to Mr. Irwin Lipsky, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lipsky of 
Brooklyn, N. Y., on August 1 5th. 

Miss Brower is a graduate of New 
Hanover High School and attended 
The Pan-American School in Rich- 
mond, Va. 

Mr. Lipsky graduated from 
Thomas Jefferson High School in 
Brooklyn and attended N. Y. State 
Institute of Arts and Science, where 
he studied drafting. 

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Phone Greensboro 4-6353 



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Commercial, Industrial 
House Wiring Service 

791 I High Point Rd. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

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S. T. Wyrick & Co. 

Office Equipment, Supplies 
Printing, Engraving 

I 1 7 North Greene St. Dial 2-4133 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



New Year Greetings 

LOGAN PORTER 
MIRROR CO. 

Master Mirrors 
HIGH POINT, N. C. 

E. A. WOODELL 
and CO. 

Printing • Engraving 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



The wedding is expected to take 
place sometime in the early winter. 

Our community is looking for- 
ward to the Fall activities, what 
with a summer of vacations at the 
beaches in Wilmington and travel- 
ing from one end of the country to 
the other — as the crow flies — we're 
all ready, more or less, to get our 
teeth into the drives planned for 
Sisterhood and Hadassah this year. 

Mr. and Mrs. Justin Raphael are 
the proud parents of a baby boy, 
born to them on July 24th. They 
have named him Kent Jay. His 
mommy is the former Shirley Ber- 
ger and ex-correspondent for the 
Wilmington column. Mazel Tov 
Shirley and Justin and Mr. and Mrs. 
Sam Berger, the grandparents. 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert Karp have 
added another son to the clan as of 
August 10th, Jeffrey Bruce is the 
new baby's name. 

I MAf | 

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1 Telephone | 

1 Co. | 

| HIGH POINT, N. C. | 



Piedmont Color & Chemical Co. 

Oils ♦ Soaps^ Finishes ♦ Bleach 

P. Box 790 Telephone 2182 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 



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A Good Place for Auto Care j 

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FRANK'S 

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I 227 N. Greene St. Dial 4-9282 i 
f 

| GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Farmers Exchange 

Fryers — Hens — Stags — Poultry 
Dressed While U Wait 
211 E. Sycamore St. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



WALTON'S 

SHOE SHOP 

Expert Shoe Repairing 
122 W. Sycamore Dial 3-4917 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes 

WRIGHT'S 



335 S. Main St. 

Give Us a Trial 



CLEANERS 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 
- to Please You 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




Geri Le Brun and Genie Jacobs, Correspondents 




Two big, fancy cocktail parties to 
report this month, and aren't we 
the ones? 

Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Pearl had 
a grand open house on Sunday, 
August 23 in honor of Dot and Al 
Hamburger, daughter and son-in- 
law of the host and hostess. Every- 
one turned out to wish a tearful 
"Good-bye" to Dot and Al, who 
are leaving for Atlanta shortly. Lots 
of luck to both of you, and here's 
hoping you find Atlanta as nice a 
place to live as Greensboro. We 
know that Atlanta will like you. 

Dr. and Mrs. Jack Tannenbaum 
entertain Benny and Betty Vatz at 
an open house on Saturday, August 
29 at their home on Latham Road. 
It's mighty sad to say good-bye to 
friends like Dorothy and Al, but 
isn't it nice to have such fine re- 
placements like Betty and Benny? 

Mr. and Mrs. David Bernstein 
are beaming at the good news from 
El Centro, California that their son 
and daughter-in-law, Harry and 
Joanne are the proud parents of 
newcomer Rachel Amelia. She was 
born on August 25th, and mother 
and baby are doing just fine. Per- 
haps they will come east soon and 
give us a chance to view the new 
Bernstein. Harry follows in Dave's 
footsteps in the newspaper line, as 
he is city editor of the Post Press 
newspaper out there. 

Margie Goldman was elected na- 
tional first vice-president of the 
B'nai B'rith Girls at the convention 
held August 21-25 at the University 
of Illinois, Champaign, 111. This is 



a signal honor and Margie is receiv- 
ing well-merited congratulations 
from her many friends. 

Our Beth David Sisterhood got 
off to a bang-up start at its first 
board meeting earlv in August, at 
which practicallv all members were 
present (which is wonderful, con- 
sidering that this is still vacation 
time). Many exciting plans were 
discussed and made for a year of 
social and fund-raising activity — the 
first of the social events to be our 
Post Yom Kippur Dance, Saturday 
evening, September 19th, to which 
all Beth David members and new- 
comers are invited, llierc will be 
dancing to a good band, refresh- 
ments, and surprise entertainment, 
and we are expecting a gala affair. 

Mazel Tov and congratulations to 
the following, who have had blessed 
events during the summer months: 
Mr. and Mrs. Adrian Gaynor, a 
babv boy — Mr. and Mrs. Leo Ing- 
"ber, blessed with a baby girl (they 
-already have two boys) — Mr. and 
Mrs. Dave Levine of Reidsville, a 
baby boy, and Mr. and Mrs. Leon- 
ard Morris (newcomers to the Beth 
David Family), a boy. . . . May they 
all derive much nachas from their 
new additions. We also wish to of- 
fer congratulations and best wishes 
to the following families who have 
moved into new homes during the 
past months: Mr. and Mrs. Reuben 
Peck, who now live at 504 Willow- 
brook Drive — Mr. and Mrs. Ludwig 
Guthmann and son Peter, who ex- 
pect to move into their new home 
at 2328 Albright Drive on Septem- 
ber 1st. — Mr. and Mrs. Edward 




INSURANCE CD M 



HOME OFFICE 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

INCORPORATED 1927 



The Following Firms in . . . 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 




^ MONTALBO'S 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 





Fur News — 

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THE MONTALDO LABEL IN YOUR FURS SPEAKS FOR ITSELF 





46 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



T T T T T 



T T T T T T 



WARREN'S 
TOYLAND 



The Largest Toy and Juvenile Furniture Shop 



2168 Lawndale Dr. in 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

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KENERLY & DAVIS 



General Contractors 



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518 Willowbrook Dial 4-9096 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



R. M. WHITE 



STUART M. HARRIS 



W. & H. 

HOME IMPROVEMENT CO. 



HOME REMODELING 
• ROOFING AND ASBESTOS SIDING 
• EXTRA ROOMS BUILT TO HOMES 
• BATHROOMS AND PLUMBING 
• INSULATION 



DIAL 4-4372 for Estimates 



715 Battleground Ave. 



Greensboro, N. C. 



B. F. Goodrich 

"LIFE-SAVER" 
Tubeless Tire 

• Seals punctures. 

• Protects against blowouts. 

• Defies skids. 

Here is the first answer to all 
three tire hazards. The new 
tread has thousands of tiny 
"grip-blocks" which give it a 
caterpillar action. 



CONVENIENT TERMS 

THE B. F. GOODRICH STORE 

125 Church St. GREENSBORO, N. C. Dial 2-3197 




Fields and children, who have 
moved to Springwood Drive, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Dave Fields, who now 
live at 1400 Garland Drive. . . . 
May they all find much happiness 
in their new homes. 

Glad to learn that Mrs. Sidney 
Guyes of Burlington is back home 
after a recent operation, and is re- 
cuperating. 

After every ray of sunshine, it 
seems a little rain must fall, and a 
little of it has touched some of our 
Beth David Family. Our deepest 
condolences to Mrs. Lindy of Bur- 
lington and Mrs. A. L. Hyman, 
who recently lost their father after 
an illness of about two years. 

Sorry to hear that Seymour Levin 
had a bad automobile accident be- 
tween Greensboro and Burlington, 
and received a broken collar bone as 
a result. However, after one day he 
was out of the hospital, all dressed 
up in a cast, and we understand he 
is already back on the job, cast and 
all. Hope it doesn't give too much 
trouble, Seymour. Our best wishes 
for a quick mend. 

Best wishes to Ladd Landau, son 
of Dr. and Mrs. Harry Karesh, who 
has been shipped to the Far East. 
. . . Also, to Donnie Prago, son of 
the Sam Prago's, who we hear is in 
Korea. Hope they'll both be home 
with us soon. 

A fond and sorrowful farewell to 
our good friends and members, Har- 
ry and Rose Abrams, who are leav- 
ing Greensboro for the not too dis- 
tant High Point. Hope we'll get to 
see you often, folks ... It was also 
goodbve to the Seymour Posner's 
who have moved to Los Angeles, 



Calif. We wish them everv happi- 
ness in their new venture. 

Wedding Bells have sounded for 
Bill Zuckerman and Sandra Schoen- 
zeit who were married in New York 
City by our own Rabbi Simcha 
Kling on Saturday afternoon, Au- 
gust 1 5th, at the Park Royal Hotel. 
They're a darling couple, and we 
know they'll make a good team. 
They will soon be in their Chapel 
Hill apartment, where Bill will at- 
tend the U. of N. C. Law School 
and Sandv will be teaching school. 
Good luck to you both. . . . 

Wedding bells were also ring- 
ing for two more sons of Beth Da- 
vid members — Sam Steinberg who 
took his Miami miss to be his 
dearly beloved wife on August 30th, 
and Jack (Buddy) Levin who 
ried lovely Miriam Block of Nash- 
ville, Tenn., also on August 30th. 
Every good wish to them both for 
a full and rich Jewish life together. 

And so ends the monthly news of 
activity for our Beth David family. 
We hope to have many more happy 
events to report in our next issue, 
and meanwhile, hope everyone is 
ready for a full vear of activity after 
a summer of much relaxation ... Be 
seein' vou soon. — Genie Jacobs. 

Miss Sandra Schoenzeit became 
the bride of William Ellis Zucker- 
man of Greensboro, N. C, at the 
Park Royal Hotel, New York City, 
on August 15th, where Rabbi Sim- 
cha Kling of Greensboro's Beth Da- 
vid Synagogue officiated. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Schoen- 
zeit, parents of the bride, received 
afterward. Standing with them were 
the bridegroom's parents, Mr. and 



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GREENSBORO, N. C. 



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GREENSBORO, N. C. 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



Mrs. Isaac Lewis Zuckerman of 
Greensboro. 

The bride was given in marriage 
by her father and attended by Miss 
Haryce Schoenzeit. Murray Politis 
of Greensboro was best man for the 
bridegroom, 'Who selected as ushers 
Elliot Rose of Durham, N. C, and 
Robert Kriegsman of Greensboro. 
Music was by Don Joseph and his 
orchestra. 

The bridal pair will live at 134 
Purefoy Road, Chapel Hill, N. C., 
where Mr. Zuckerman will enter 



the University of North Carolina 
law school in autumn. 

Mrs. Zuckerman is a graduate of 
Hunter College and has been at- 
tending Duke University, Durham, 
on a scholarship studying toward 
her master's degree in English. She 
will teach in Durham County 
schools this fall. 

Mr. Zuckerman, an only son, is a 
graduate of Greensboro Senior High 
School and of Carolina. He is a 
member of Tau Epsilon Psi Fra- 
ternity. 



ASHEYILLE, N. C. 

Mrs. Leon H. Feldman, Correspondent 



The week of August tenth was a 
memorable one in the Land of the 
Sky. This week brought to Ashe- 
ville many National officers and Di- 
rectors of B'nai B'rith for the Ad- 
visor}- Committee Meeting which 
was held at the Grove Park Inn. 

Among those present were Mr. 
Philip Klutznick, International 
.President of B'nai B'rith, his wife 
and five lovely children — Betty Lou, 
Tommy, Jimmy, Bobby and Sam- 
my; Rabbi Lelyveld, National Hillel 
Director; Mr. Richard Gudstadt, 
honorary Chairman of the A.D.L.; 
Mr. Sidney Kusworm, . Treasurer; 
Mr. Maurice Bisgyer, Secretary; 
Vice Presidents: Mr. John Horo- 
witz, Dr. Maurice Goldberg and 
wife, Mr. Benjamin Morris and 
wife, Mr. I. W. Garek and Mr. Max 
J. Schneider; Mrs. Albert Wold- 
man, President of the Women's Su- 
preme Council; Mrs. Arthur Lauf- 
man, Director of Women's Activi- 
ties; and Mr. Max Baer, Director of 
B.B.Y.O. Mr. Maurice Weinstein, 
President of District Grand Lodge 
No. 5 and founder of the B'nai 
B'rith Institutes of Charlotte, N. C, 
and Mr. Joseph Hanchrow, District 
No. 5 Chairman of the American- 
ism and Civic Affairs Commission, 
and State Chairman for the Insti- 



tutes from Wilson, N. C, were 
guests at the Sunday and Monday 
meetings. 

A dinner was held at the Grove 
Park Inn on Sunday evening by the 
members of the Advisory Board. 
Mr. Leon Rocamora, President of 
the local B'nai B'rith Men's Lodge; 
Mr. Isaac Gradman, Past President 




MRS. ARTHUR G. LAUFMAN 

of District Grand Lodge No. 5, and 
Mrs. Gradman; Dr. Leon H. Feld- 
man, Retiring American and Civic 
Affairs Commissioner and District 



LAMBETH CONSTRUCTION CO. 

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GREENSBORO, N. C. 




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GUY M. TURNER, President 



48 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




Your Complete Store for the Home = 



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GREENSBORO, N. C. 



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No. 5 Executive Board member, 
and Mrs. Feldman, and Mrs. Joseph 
Hanchrow were guests at the dinner. 
During the dinner, Tommy Klutz- 
nick, who was celebrating his sixth 
birthday, 'stole the show' with his 
speech: "Come to order. I want to 
tell you about B'nai B'rith, it's a 
fine organization. Do you know why 
everyone should belong to B'nai 
B'rith? I'll tell you, it's wonderful!" 

Monday evening found the Ad- 
visory Committee members and 
families attending a Jamboree at the 
Hominy Valley Horse and Hound 
Club which is situated by the beau- 
tiful Enka Lake. Mr. Norman Sul- 
tan was the over-all Chairman for 
this affair and was assisted by the 
Messrs. Sy Fligel, Morris Lipinsky, 
Jr., Stan Golden, Herbert Schiftan, 
Ed Goldsmith, Sol Isaac, Herman 
Silver, Lee Starer, Marty Belovin, 
Stan Smollen, Egon Frcidlander, 
Jacob Maslow, and the Dr.'s Feld- 
man and Eugene Shapiro. The 
Shrine bus was donated by the local 
club and Mr. Jerry Silverman, 
chauffeur for the evening, transport- 
ed the official members and their 
families to the Club Pavillion. Fol- 
lowing a very delicious barbecue 
supper, Mr. Klutznick gave a short 
address on the developments at the 
meeting and the services B'nai 
B'rith has, and shall continue to 
render in building Jewish and civic 
life for the well being of all. He 
commended the women on the fine 
activities which aid in carrying out 
the B'nai B'rith projects on an edu- 
cational and democratic level and 
have done so much in aiding the 
youth groups. 

Following the address, a program 
of Western North Carolina music 
and dances, arranged by Mr. Hu- 
bert Hayes, the author of Thunder- 
land, was presented. Included in 
the show was Pan Handle Pete, the 
one man band with horns, drums, 
bells and voice; the Champion 
Square Dance team from Hall 
Fletcher Hall Elementary School, 
ballad singers, and guitarists. 

Also included in the program was 
the presentation of awards. Mr. Ed 
Goldsmith was presented with a 50 
year Membership Certificate, and 
Mr. Jake Rosen was the recipient of 
the 25 year award. On the lighter 
side of life, Dr. Eugene Shapiro 
won the golf trophy. The runner-up 
was Mr. Whitlock Lees. 

After the program, the band 
played on, and those who were not 
too exhausted from the excitement 
and the laughter of the evening par- 
ticipated in a few rounds ... of 
square dancing. 



Your Shopping Center for the 
Finest in Sporting Goods 

COBLE SPORTING 
GOODS CO. 

I 19 N. Greene St. Dial 2-0912 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



W. H. ANDREWS, 
C. L. U. 



Jr. 



Manager and Associate 

Home Office Agency 
Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Co. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Flowers 

Dial 2-2313 

MASON-PETTEY 

Florists 
1600 Friendly Rd. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



GREENSBORO MARBLE 
and TILE CO. 

Marble — Tilework 
1711 Spring Garden Street 
Dial 2-2309 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Oakmont, 
Inc. 

) Commercial 
# Residential 



BUILDING 
CONTRACTORS 

Estimates Given 
Bids Submitted 

"OVER 25 YEARS 
BUILDING EXPERIENCE" 

Lawndale Dr. Ext. 
Dial 3-9877 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




Whether the young men in this picture emigrate or have to remain in Germany 
they will possess lifelong trades as radio mechanics with which to rebuild their 
lives, when they complete training at the ORT vocational center in the British 
sector of West Berlin. In the divided city that has become the chief exit from 
behind the Iron Curtain, the ORT program equips Jews with productive occu- 
pations, preparing them for skilled jobs and economic independence. Estab- 
lished after the war for DPs, the school is now aiding escapees from the East. 
Main financial support comes from the Joint Distribution Committee, out of 
United Jewish Appeal funds. 



Among the women's activities, 
Mrs. Maurice Goldberg, President 
of the Women's District Grand 
Lodge No. 5, met with the Charter 
members of the Women's group in 
Asheville and aided in planning the 



John H. 
MAXWELL 

Heating and 
Ventilating Co. 

Forced Air Heating — 
and 

Ventilating Installations 

524 Willowbrook Ave. 

Dial 4-6825 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Happy New Year 

Piedmont Outdoor 
Advertising Co. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



organization of their Chapter. On 
Wednesday, a Tea was held at the 
Battery Park Hotel in honor of Mrs. 
Albert Woldman, President of the 
Women's Supreme Council, and 
Mrs. Arthur Laufman, Director of 
Women's Activities . . . both of 
whom are members of the Advisory 
Committee to the National Su- 
preme Council. Mrs. Laufman in- 
formed those present of the purpose 
and projects of the B'nai B'rith 
Women including the ADL and 
the Youth Activities, and the im- 
portance of women aiding in the 
entire coordinated program for fam- 
ily, National and World Jewry. The 
Petition for Charter was completed 
with thirty three signatures. All 
members are looking forward to an 
active year and have offered their 
services and support for the welfare 
of the community. 

Do It Now! Buy That 
Israel Bond! 



Cecil 

Contracting Co. 

Greensboro, N. C. 



BRYAN'S SHEET METAL SHOP | 

General Sheet Metal and Furnace Work j 

III Spring Garden St. Ext. Dial 2-4319 I 

GREENSBORO, N. C. j 



BROWNHILL'S 



GREENSBORO 



NORTH CAROLINA 



Quality Fashions 
that instantly establish 
your reputation 
■for individuality. 



apparel . . 



fur 



accessories 



ELAM DRUG 


CO. 


Ethical Pharmacists to the Health 


Professions 


2112 Walker Ave. 


Dial 6612 


GREENSBORO, N. C. 





j Carolina Roofing and Siding Company 

j BONDED ROOFERS 

All Types of Roofing — Guttering 

1431 Winston Street Dial 3-2188 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



We Invite You to Visit 

LAWNDALE 
PASTRY SHOP 

"It's Different" 

Party Calces for All Occasions 

Sour Rye — Pumpernickel 
Danish Pastries, Cheese Cake, etc. 

Lawndale Drive Dial 5-3495 

RALPH'S FOOD PALACE 
Is Next to Us 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



AIR-CONDITIONED 

Private Tile Baths and 
Radio in Every Room 
Television on Request 
Beauty Rest Mattresses 

GARRETT'S 
Grade "A" Motel 
3-9304 

U. S. Highway 29 and 70 
At Sedgefield, N. C. 
HIGH POINT ROAD 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



G^J&^S^ cJCs^KL^S tfS^SSL-iSSa $ 

Dial 2-5131 f 





SYKES 

FLORISTS CO., 
Inc. 



Quality Home Grown Roses 
At No Higher Prices 



81 







120 W. Market St. 
Next to Western Union 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 

® <S£^&-^3^ <S£5=*"©r*Q5> G£^<£r^i£ Q 



I N. C. Monroe | 

Construction 
Co. 

I General Construction 

Dial 4-9759 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



50 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



MILLER FURNITURE CO. 



Good Furniture 

314 South Elm St. 



Reasonably Priced 

Dial 3-3441 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



ARNOLD STONE COMPANY 



915 Warren St. 



CONCRETE PRODUCTS 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Dial 2-1 194 



TTTTTTTT 



ALEXANDER & MANN MOTOR CO. 

Authorized Dealers 
AUSTIN— HILLMAN MINX— MIDGET— MORRIS MINOR 

Sales and Service 



234 Commerce PI. 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Dial 3-2882 



C. O. MARTIN and SONS 

GRADING OF ROADS, STREETS AND DAMS 
Drain Tile Installed Crushed Stone Delivered 

Lawndale Drive Dial 2-5323 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Bishop Rug & Upholstery Cleaning Co. 



RUGS CLEANED AND STORED 
On-Loeation Carpet Cleaning 

901 Battleground Avenue 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Dial 8916 



5:^:8:5.4: : . : : J : .. >. :^ I . ^ : . 

"Serving Greensboro Since 1914" 

GATE CITY MOTOR CO.. Inc. 

Chrysler • Plymouth Sales and Service 

1 30 North Forbis St. Dial 2-0 1 43 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



Greetings and Best Wishes 

Guilford County Beer Distributors 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Our Best Wishes for a Happy New Year 

O'CONNOR SISTERS 

Florists 

1 352 South Elm Street GREENSBORO, N. C. 



FIRST OIL-DRILLING EQUIPMENT 
GOES FROM TEXAS TO ISRAEL 




Lenore Levinson of Wichita Falls, Texas, uses crude oil to launch aa oil- 
drilling rig about to be transported to Israel, while Abraham Raben, Chairman 
of the Wichita Falls Committee for Israel Bonds, looks on. The rig, modified 
so that it is capable of drilling to a depth of 20,000 feet, is the first to be sent 
to Israel, and will be operated by Pontiac Petroleum. Funds derived from the 
Israel Bond Issue are making possible the expansion of all facets of Israel's 
economy, and the exploitation of her natural resources. 



You'll find what you want at 

WILLS-JERVIS 
Book & Stationery Co. 

1 07 S. Greene St. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



At Your Service 

KYLE'S ESSO 
SERVICE STATION 

323 S. Greene St. Dial 4-4 1 60 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 




GREENSBORO 
NEHI BOTTLING CO. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Shop at 

SEARS 

and Save 




Retail Store 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



51 



GOLDSBORO, N. C. 

Mrs. Mannah Shrago, Correspondent 



Corporal Mannie Bernstein, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Isadore Bernstein, 
is in Korea, having joined the U. S. 
forces last September. He has been 
promoted to head of the supply de- 
partment in his unit. His address is 
U. S. 551-272-75, c/o C 11th Engi- 
neer Combat Btn. A.P.O. 264, Post- 
master, San Francisco, Calif. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Leder, of 
New York, have been with Mr. and 
Mrs. Isadore Bernstein for a few 
days. Mrs. Bernstein is the daugh- 
ter of the Leder's. 

Miss Shirley Rhea Shrago, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Mannah Shra- 
go, is spending the summer at Camp 
Louise, Cascade, Ma., where she is 
waterfront counsellor and swimming 
instructor. She will enter Goucher 
College in Baltimore, Md. 

Harold Kadis, who has been tour- 
ing the various countries of Europe 
this summer, was expected back in 
New York late in August. His par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Ike Kadis, went 
up to meet him. 

Miss Faye Shrago and Miss Les- 
lie Weil are home from camp at 
Brevard, N. C, where they enjoyed 
the summer. They are the daugh- 
ters, respectively, of Mr. and Mrs. 
Mannah Shrago, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Weil. 

Mr. and Mrs. Simon Rosenfeld 
returned from Atlanta, Ga., after a 
stay of two weeks. 

Mrs. Llelen Jones, of Washington, 
D. C, spent the week end recently 
with her mother, Mrs. Yetta Cohen, 
and her sister, Byrdie. 

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Epstein vis- 
ited with Mr. Epstein's mother, 



A Profitable 

HOME 

For Your Savings 




HOME FEDERAL 

Savings & Loan Association 

113 North Greene Street 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Mrs. Morris Epstein, and his sister, 
Mrs. E. R. Shirley. 

Mrs. Leslie Weil, Miss Gertrude 
Weil and Miss Ida Hamin spent a 
week motoring in the Blue Ridge 
Mountains, in the western part of 
the state. 

Mr. and Mrs. Morris Leder, 
daughter, Michele, and Mrs. Leder's 
mother, Mrs. Barker, were at the 
Warner Hotel, Virginia Beach, Va., 
for a week. 

Mrs. Ben Ellis and daughter Jan- 
nie, have returned from Los An- 
geles, Calif., where they spent the 
summer with Mrs. Ellis' mother, 
Mrs. Hausig. 

Mrs. A. Gordon is in New York 
visiting her daughter. 

Leo Baum, of Washington, D. 
C, has been visiting with his son, 
Robert, and the latter's wife. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Korschun 
have been vacationing at Atlantic 
Beach, N. C. 

Best wishes to Mrs. Schmitt and 
Mr. and Mrs. Max Firnbacher who 
have moved into their new home. 

Arnold Leder, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Morris Leder, and Louis Weil, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Weil, 
have returned from the Boy Scout 
Jamboree in California. 

Bobby Kadis and Allen Korschun 
attended the Youth Conclave at Lit- 
tle Switzerland. 

David Weil, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Weil will enter the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina this Fall. Al- 
so matriculating there is Allen Kor- 
schun, who graduated from Exeter 
Academy at Andovcr, New Hamp- 
shire. 



Why Buy It? 

RENT IT! 

• Folding Chairs 
® Banquet and Bridge Tables, 

Punch Bowls, Cups, Plates, 

Banquet Cloths 
& Coat Racks, Rollaway Beds 
@ Silverware 
® Hospital Beds and Wheel \ 

Chairs 

• Baby Beds, High Chairs, 
Nursery and other rental 
items 

We Deliver and Pick Up 

CHAIR RENTAL 
SERVICE 

A. D. Owenby, Jr., W. M. Owenby 

GREENSBORO HIGH POINT 
Phone 4-1130 Ph. 7235 or 4644 



BULLOCK and HUMBLE 

Heating and Air Conditioning Units 

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL INSTALLATIONS 
With Nationally Advertised Units 
Carrier — De/co — Chrysler AirTemp 



1027 Oakmont 



Dial 44050 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



CAROLINA OFFICE MACHINES 

Typewriters — Adding Machines — Cash Registers 
SOLD — RENTED — REPAIRED 
► Phone 4-104! 214 E. Sycamore St. 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



Eye Glass Prescriptions Accurately Filled 





206 N. Elm 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Dial 3-9286 



ARCHER TREE EXPERT CO. 

COMPLETE TREE SERVICE 

Pruning — Bracing — Feeding — Cavity Filling 
and Tree Moving 

LICENSED AND INSURED T. C. ARCHER, JR., Owner 

209 Park Ave. — Dial 2-3305 GREENSBORO, N. C. 



See Us for ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 

Your Westinghouse Dealer 



DAVIS TIRE COMPANY 



= Dial 2-1 182 



414 S. Greene St. 



GREENSBORO, N. C. = 



COX RADIATOR COMPANY 

Radiator Service ♦ Sales and Repairs 



430 Battleground 



Dial 7504 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 




GREENSBORO BAG CO. 



BURLAP AND COTTON BAGS 
INDUSTRIAL WIPING CLOTHS 



621 Stirling St. 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Dial 3-2148 



52 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



SCHENCK and COMPANY 

PAUL W. SCHENCK AGENCY 
All Kinds Insurance Surety and Fidelty Bonds 

502 North Elm Street GREENSBORO, N. C. 



FROM MONTREUX TO GENEVA 

(Concluded From Page 16) 



NEW METHOD LAUNDRY 

Complete Laundry Service 

862-864-868 South Elm Street Dial 8862 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



^nM!!iiililSIIIIIIIilllMi>MEiElinilllliillllllllllllliI]H!i!!ISIIIIIIIIIIililllII!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIU: 

| Southern Wastepaper Company | 

= "Wastepaper Specialists" I 

| 501 East Washington Street Dial 2-1447 | 

| GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA | 

^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiigiiii!iiii!iiiiiiii!i!iiigiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiaiiiijifiiisisiiiiiiiiigiiiiiiiiiiiii~ 



Try the 

PURITAN CAFE 

You'll Enjoy Our Meals 

218 N. Elm 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



New Year Greetings 

SOUTHEASTERN 
SODA SHOP 

We Appreciate Your Patronage 
Southeastern Building 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes 

GREENSBORO ELECTRIC CO. 

RICHARD G. STANLEY, Owner 
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING AND REPAIRING 
2312 Freeman's Mill Road Dial 5-2823 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes 

PIEDMONT PIE COMPANY 



i 

j 

i High Point Road 

i 
i 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Telephone 8379 j 



You'll Enjoy Dining at 

CASEY'S BAR-B-Q RESTAURANT 



STEAKS — CHICKEN — SEAFOODS 



1715 Madison Ave. 



Dial 4-7728 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Wray Plumbing and Heating Co. 

Serving Our Community Since 1915 
| YOUR IRON FIREMAN DEALER 

= 305 Holt Avenue Dial 2-1502 

= GREENSBORO, N. C. 



ure, it was due to the effort of the 
Congress that the United Nations 
finally adopted the Convention on 
the Declaration of the Death of 
Missing Persons, with all that it may 
mean to mam thousands of people 
in the inheritance of property, the 
right to remarriage, and in many 
other ways. 

No survey of the work of the Con- 
gress in the United Nations can 
omit a reference to the contribution 
made by the Congress' Department 
of Culture to the work of the 
UNESCO. One of the most im- 
portant contributions which it has 
made has been in the field of text- 
book revision. If the place of the 
Jewish people in the development 
of human civilization will receive 
just treatment in the monumental 
history of mankind which UNESCO 
is producing, it may well be be- 
cause, on the initiative of the Con- 
gress, one of the foremost Jewish 
historians of our age has been called 
into consultation. 

When the United Nations 
granted consultative status to the 
World Jewish Congress, it virtually 
ended the discussion on the validity 
of the international organization of 
Jewish life. Groups which had ad- 
hered to the strange doctrine of 
organized Jewish disunity as a prin- 
ciple of democratic life, were com- 
pelled hastily to organize interna- 
tional groupings for the purpose 



F. R. Holliday 
& Co. 

Specializing in the 
Installation of 

Steam, Hot Water 

and 

Radiant 

Heating Systems 

OIL BURNERS 
STOKERS 
BOILERS 

A Complete Line of 

Heating and Plumbing 

for Homes and Industry 

1163 Battleground Ave. 

Dial 4-6346 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



of obtaining consultative status. 
Whether these comparatively small 
groups have been effective, the his- 
torian will judge. But that their 
organization, which was a belated 
effort to catch up with the march 
of events, is a refutation of the 
anti-Congress case, can no longer 
be in doubt. ITiose who once, in 
the words of the English poet, came 
to scoff, remained to pray. It is now 
patent that the defense of Jewish 
rights, the liquidation of the prob- 
lems which war and revolution have 
bequeathed to us, and the mainte- 
nance and strengthening of Jewish 
life, have made the Congress, or 
something like it, indispensable for 
the Jewish people. 



Special Equipment for 
Commercial Mills 

Without Interfering with 
Production 

CRAWFORD 
PAINT CO. 

Contractors & Decorators 
Commercial Painting 
Spray Painting 

1306 ELWELL AVE. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 
2-0298 



SEASON'S GREETINGS 
AND BEST WISHES 

to Our Many Jewish Friends 
for a Very Happy Holiday 
Season 



R. B. 

Langley 

1 Commercial 
Q Residential 

# Industrial 
BUILDING 

2105 Langley St. 
Dial 2-4164 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



53 



On the Founding of Bar-Han University 

By LUDWIG LEWISOHN 

Ludwig Lewisohn the world-famous Jewish philosopher and educator, offers 
in this statement a profound analysis of the moral crisis of our age for both 
western civilization and Jews as members and creators of that civilization. The 
role of the Bar-Ilan university which the Mizrachi (religious-Zionist) Organiza- 
tion of America is bulding in Israel, as Dr. Lewisohn views it in relation to the 
fight for a stable system of personal values, is here outlined. — THE EDITOR. 



It would not be difficult to wel- 
come the founding of the Bar-Ilan 
University and the early laying of 
the cornerstone at Ramat Gan in 
conventionally handsome term s. 
Others will use these terms and use 
them with sincerity and propriety. 
I desire, however, to assume a very 
special intellectual responsibility in 
this matter and briefly ground my 
conviction that the establishment of 
this university — this and no other — 
is an event of high and precise and 
unrivaled significance. 

The long crisis of mankind is 
slowly revealing itself as a crisis of 
moral lawlessness and self-worship. 
A century of merciless secularism 
has demonstrably ended in ineffable 
cruelty to man and in spiritual an- 
guish, cosmic homelessness, frantic 
confusion. The trend toward moral 
lawlessness and self-worship cul- 
minated when two great nations, the 
Russian and the German, cast off 
the millenial restraints deliberately 
and on principle, and threw the 
Western World into an icy, blood- 
soaked desolateness. Formlessness 
succeeded the precarious forms of 
yesterday; chaos invaded cosmos. 
Frightened soothsayers saw the end 
of man. 

The Jewish people was affected by 
this culmination of crisis in two 
separate ways. The Soviets sought 
from the start to extirpate Judaism 
and Hitler to extirpate Jews. One 



system murdered the soul; the other 
the body. Idolatrous slave-states 
could not endure the Jewish people 
— the living incarnation, even in sin, 
apostasy, indifference of God and 
His Law, of form, cosmos, obedi- 
ence. The destruction of so vast a 
proportion of the living Jewish peo- 




LUDWIG LkWISOHN 

pie is a description, a definition, of 
the nature of the human crisis — of 
its lawlessness and its idolatrous 
character. 

But the Jewish people was affect- 
ed in still another way. It was physi- 
cal victim. But it was also spiritually 
victimized. Thousands of Jews, es- 
pecially among those who consid- 
ered themselves as intellectuals, 
joined in the nihilist rebellion 
against the foundations of human 




pHOTO-ENGMVEft 



II 

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B£N DAY. HALFTONES - COLOR PLATES 



DeriGn/ 



DAILY n€W/ 
b vy i l d i n g 



M— Phone 1 
r-S— 3-8611 =P=i 



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KARPET-KARE The "Bigel ow" Method 

Cleans Carpets Like New in Just One Day 



IDEAL FOR WALL-TO-WALL CARPETS 



American Cleaning & Mothproof Co. 



"Excellent Rug Cleaning Department" 
ESTIMATES — NO OBLIGATIONS 
Lawndale Drive Extension 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Dial 4-2722 



illlllllllllllllllllllllllllligilllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliHIlliililiHiiHIIUSlHi: 

I COLUMBIA LAUNDRY CO. | 

= A Complete Service in Laundry and Dry Cleaning E 

= ZONED PICK UP AND DELIVERY = 

= Try Our Counter Service PROMPT — COURTEOUS — EFFICIENT = 

= Dial 8193 901 Battleground Avenue = 

| GREENSBORO, N. C. | 



Plantation Supper Club 

First in Food • Firt in Entertainment 
Higfi Point Road GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Dial 3-1917 for Reservations for Small or Large Parties 




| A Happy New Year from 

i 



HALL-KIMES JEWELRY CO. 



Specialists in Jewelry Engraving 



513 N. Eugene 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



i 

2-1310 | 



LIFE INSURANCE 

Castles in the Air become realities when supported by 
a solid foundation of Life Insurance. 

Walter J. Bernstein 

Special Agent — Ordinary Dept. 
Jefferson Building Phone 6419 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



THE PRUDENTIAL 
INSURANCE COMPANY 
OF AMERICA 
Home Office, Newark, N. J. 



THE MABIE-BELL CO. 

Architectural Concrete Products 



High Point Road 



Dial 3-4205 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Traders Chevrolet Company, Inc. 



Sales 




tervice 



OUT-VALUES — OU T-SELLS ALL OTHERS 



215 E. Market 



GREENSBORO. N. C. 



i 

I 

Dial 2-2146 I 



54 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




Pierce C. Rucker 

Associate Enterprises 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Electric Contractors 

RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL 
and Industrial 

Lighting Fixtures 
Appliances - Repairing 

C. H. TALLEY, Owner 

TALLEY 
ELECTRIC CO. 

1109 Battleground Ave. 

Dial 4-1531 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Try 

Glidden's 

SPRED SATIN 

The Only Inside 

WALL PAINT 

With 100% Rubber Base 

Fleet-Plummer 
Hardware Co. 

227 N. Elm St. Dial 3-5985 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



COBLE DAIRY 
PRODUCTS, Inc. 

Try Our Delicious 

Cottage Cheese 
Sour Cream 

You'll Like Its Taste 

At Your Grocer 
or Phone 3-0384 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Insist on the Finest 
Dial 5-2545 

STORKLINE 

Diaper Service 

"Tops in Bottoms" 
Only Home-Owned 

DIAPER SERVICE 
in 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 




Organs for Church and Home 
Baldwin - Wnrlitzer - Hammond 

MOORE MUSIC CO. 

615 W. Market St. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Something New in 
Greensboro 

Try Our 

"Orchid Service" 
For Your More Expensive 
Garments 

BLUE BIRD 

CLEANERS, Inc. 

E. J. FERRYMAN & SONS 

1613 Madison Avenue 
Dial 3-2270 



George W. Kane 

General Contractors 

ROXBORO, N. C. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 
DURHAM, N. C. 



civilization, proclaimed the godless- 
ness of the universe, sold themselves 
into the slavery of the idolators and 
helped to gnaw away the rock upon 
which alone their feet could stand. 
The bitter consequences of this 
pseudo-humanitarian apostasy crept 
even into the redeemed land of 
Israel and in this hour still threatens 
the State. For no one not wholly 
bereft of historical vision or histori- 
cal insight will imagine that the 
Medinath Yisroel can serve its func- 
tion either as a nation or as a factor 
among the nations, unless it houses 
a people that will be in the deepest 
sense a different, a differentiated 
people, a goy kaddosh (Holy Peo- 
pie). 

But why, our sages ask, can we 
endure the blows of the All-Merci- 
ful? Because, they answer, He al- 
ways raises us up again. Slowlv, 
painfully, everywhere there are those 
who are awaking from the nihilist 
nightmare; there are those who are 
preparing the turning-point of the 
long crisis of secularism and idolatry; 
there are those who are beginning to 
realize that man's freedom consists 
exclusively in his choice of a Law 
which he shall obey and that this 
Law must be, in different senses for 
different groups, but supremely for 
the Jewish people, the Law of God. 
"Greater is he"-our sages reiterate — 
"who is commanded and obevs than 
he that is not commanded." First 
guard the majestic form of life; first 
impose an intelligible world on 
chaos; first practice obedience to the 



sources of your being and the immi- 
nent command of your destiny. 

It seems to me that the founding 
of the Bar-Ilan University is the 
most concrete symbol hitherto of 
the forces of redemption that are 
gradually gathering at various points. 
It will be the first culmination. I 
take it that the University, whatever 
it teaches, and I trust it will take all 
human knowledge as its province, 
will teach from a Jewish center, will 
teach all matters under the aspect of 
Law, of form, of the necessary obedi- 
ence to one's Law which is the onlv 
definition of freedom for such a 
creature as man in such a world as 
the present. 

An eminent and dedicated Israeli 
scholar asked the other day: "Are 
we in Israel still Jews?" That is the 
supreme question. For unless the 
people of the State are Jews — Jews 
in the classical sense — and unless the 
State is a Jewish State whose conti- 
nuitv with the whole of Jewish his- 
torv is unhurt and unbreached, un- 
less that is so, the aspirations toward 
Zion and all the blood and tears 
and all the generosity and selfless 
effort of many generations will be in 
mortal danger of having been almost 



in vain. 



I am not learned nor wise enough 
to suggest any of the means bv 
which this end of a wholly Jewish 
State is to be brought about. I am 
not unaware of the very troublesome 
problems, such as for instance the 
crucial problem of adjusting the nec- 
essities of a contemporary common- 



'jiniiiiiiiiiiiigiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'.: 



1 II L Coble Construction Company [ 

| BUILDING CONSTRUCTION OF ALL TYPES § 

E 1705 Battleground Avenue Dial 2-4589 = 

E GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA = 



r t iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 



Phil R. Carlton 

Incorporated 

Real Estate — Rents 
Insurance — Bonding 



Carlton Building 
Opposite Courthouse 

Dial 8157 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



THE BEST 

in funeral home facilities, with an 
establishment built for the purpose 
and kept constantly up-tO'date. 




il 



'uneral Home 



the +rome of Thtiucjhtf ul Sc vv\a 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



55 




Dr. Arthur T. Jacobs, Executive Director of HI AS, the Hebrew Immigrant Aid 
Society, speaking on a Voice of America radio program which was beamed 
overseas, categorized the recently enacted Refugee Relief Act of the U. S. as 
"a step in the right direction," and expressed the hope that other immigration 
countries of the world would follow the U. S. example, by liberalizing their 
immigration laws and thereby absorbing their fair share of Europe's destitute, 
refugee, and homeless people who seek to reconstruct their plagued lives in 
new lands. 



wealth into the framework of halla 
chic structure. But the founding 
and functioning of Bar-Ilan Univer- 
sity is and will be a great and effec- 
tive beginning of the facing of these 
problems from the right point of 
view. 

Search and research are right and 
fruitful when the ends in view are 
right and fruitful. You will not find 
the saving truth if you do not seek 
it. And it is beyond all doubt that 
the teachers and the students at the 
Bar-Ilan University will have their 
vision on the right and eternal end 
of man's being, on the right and 



eternal nature of Jewish destiny — 
the redemption of man through the 
identification of his will with the 
Divine Will. 

A great beginning is being made. 
Let us not expect miracles. Let us 
operate with the long and kindly 
patience of Israel. Let us remember 
the saying of the sages: "Even as 
the dawn is first small and faint but 
soon grows stronger and stronger 
until at last the sun itself emerges 
— tli is it is with the redemption of 
Israel." 

Surely the Bar-Ilan University is 
a token of the dawn. 




^Forbis &Jtlurrav| 

FUNERAL HOME 

Day or Nitc, 8165 515 N. Elm St., Greensboro, N. C. 

Friendly, Sympathetic, Efficient Service 





• REFRIGERATION 

• Air Conditioning and 




• HEATING 

• Room Air-Conditioning 




ENGINEERING COMPANY 

Contractors 

DIAL 3-8246— GREENSBORO DIAL 2- 1 8 1 5— WINSTON-SALEM 



- T V ▼ VTTTYVt; 



THE ART SHOP, Inc. 

Kodaks 118 West Market Street Frames 

Photocopies GREENSBORO, Mouldings < 

Kodak Finishing NORTH CAROLINA Reproductions 

Photographic Supplies Unf ranted Prints 




BALDWIN-GARRETT COMPANY, Inc. 

Your International Harvester Dealer 

FARMALL TRACTORS and EQUIPMENT 
1011-15 South Elm Dial 4-6343 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



MARGARET SANGER, Owner-Operator 

GREYHOUND KENNELS 

Dogs and Cats Boarded 

Dial 2-451 I Hobbs Road 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Prompt Delivery Service 
DIAL 2-4127 

SUTTON'S FLORISTS, Inc. 



Market and Greene Streets 



i 

i 
i 

i 

GREENSBORO, N. C. ( 



New Year Greetings 

JOHANNESEN ELECTRIC CO.. Inc. 

Wholesale Distributors 

312 N. Eugene St. Phone 3-6906 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Hodgin Roofing & Supply Company 

Authorized Dealer for Ruberoid Products 
ASPHALT SHINGLES 

921 West Lee Street Telephone 2-4607 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



JENNINGS PLUMBING COMPANY 

Plumbing and Heating 

722 West Lee Street Dial 3-7459 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 

■A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.AA.A.A.A.Aii^^iii^^A±^^.A.A.A.A.Ai.A.A.A.i.i.i.A.i.AA.A^A.AAAA.A. 



56 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



SOUTHERN SALES CO. 

Electrical Appliances • Kelly Springfield Tires 



224 East Market St. 



Phone 3-3437 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



DIAL 3-0537 



TATUM-DALTON TRANSFER CO. 

Household Shipping and Storage 

Agents for North American Van Lines, Inc. 
311 East Washington St. GREENSBORO, N. C. 



STARR DAVIS COMPANY, Inc. 



Contractors and Distributors for 

HEAT AND COLD INSULATIONS 



Dial 5250 



502 Guilford Avenue 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Southside Hardware Co. 

A Complete Stock of Hardware 

523 South Elm Street Dial 2-2106 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



i Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company 

! Headquarters for 

\ QUALITY PAINT — GLASS 



340 North Greene St. 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



CURTIS WOODWORK — BUILDERS HARDWARE 
ROOFING MATERIALS 



Guilford Builders Supply Co., Inc. 

1621 Battleground Ave. Dial 3-9481 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



GREENSBORO 

MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Dial 2-5653 | 

i 



i 



C. T. MARTIN 

GREENE STREET SERVICE STATION 

Your SHELL Station 

200 S. Greene St. Dial 2-2523 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



THREE ASSEMBLIES— THREE MOODS 

By MAJOR ABRAHAM S. HYMAN 

In this article, written before the beginning of the World Jewish Congress Ple- 
nary Session, Abraham Hyman, former general counsel to the U. S. War 
Claims Commission, vividly recalls three stages in the last seventeen years of 
Jewish history. Mr. Hyman, who has been in the thick of some of the most 
significant post-war event' in Jewish life, incisively poses here the crucial prob- 
lems that currently demand solution by World Jewry. Mr. Hyman, in his 
capacity as advisor on Jewish affairs to Generals McCloy and Keyes, partici- 
pated in the negotiations and drafting of German and Austrian restitution laws 
and German General Claims Laws.— THE EDITOR. 



When the forthcoming plenary 
assembly is held, beginning August 
4,it will be the third time in a span 
of seventeen years that the World 
Jewish Congress will have convened 
to survey the position of the Jewish 
people throughout the world- In 
former years significant changes in 
the history of a people were per- 
ceptible only after long intervals of 
time. However, a tempo of current 
history has been so swift that these 
intervals have been immeasurably 
shortened. To gauge how much 
Jewish history has been compressed 
in the brief gap between 1936 and 
1953, it is only necessary to advert 
to the differences in the outlook of 
the three plenarv assemblies, each of 
which was arranged to coincide with 
a new phase in the contemporary 
history of the Jewi sh people 

The first plenary assembly, held 
in Geneva in 1936, found the Jew- 
ish people in a state of mortal dan- 
ger. It was a grim story to which 
this assembly had to listen: The 



DIXIE ROOFING 
COMPANY 

Roofing — Sheet Metal Work 

215 Hughes St. Dial 7730 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Get the 
Greatest Enjoyment 

«om _£ea&w{L 
HOMOGENIZED 
VITAMIN 9 
MILK 




Ice Cream - It's Delicious 

SOUTHERN DAIRIES 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



story of a sworn enemy of the Jew- 
ish people ominously repeating the 
cry, "The Jew must be destroyed"; 
the story of a world seeking to ap- 
pease an insatiable monster as the 
storv of dark reaction in Austria, 
price for "peace in our time"; the 
Poland, Rumania and Hungary; the 
story of a world demoralized and 
indifferent to moral and humani- 
tarian values. While the assembly 
resolved to face the impending crisis 
with courage, it nevertheless ad- 
journed in an atmosphere of fore- 
boding and despair. The delegates 
to the assembly realized that its 
most potent weapon, the appeal to 
the conscience of the world, could 
achieve little when mankind's con- 
science had lapsed into profound 
apathy. 

In 1948, when the second plenarv 
assembly convened in Montreux, the 
Jews were seeking to heal the cruel 
wounds inflicted by the enemy. The 
Nazis had come perilously close to 
making good their threat. East Euro- 



Happy New Year 

E. R. ZANE 

GREENSBORO, 
N. C. 



"Sleep First Class" 
YOUR CAR AT YOUR DOOR AT 

Dickinson's 

Manor Motel 

Formerly 
VICTORY MANOR 

Air Conditioned — Individual 
Room Heat Control 

member of 
QUALITY COURTS UNITED, Inc. 

1045 Market Dial 32517 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



57 



pean Jewry and its rich culture had 
been virtually annihilated. Thou- 
sands of Jews continued to vegetate 
in the DP camps awaiting develop- 
ments which would put an end to 
their homelessness. However, while 
the past was still fresh and stark in 
the memory of the delegates to the 
Montreux assembly, their attention 
was necessarily claimed by a drama 
which relegated all other problems 
to secondary importance. A dream 
and a hope kept alive by Jews for 
two thousand years had been ful- 
filled when the nations of the world 
recognized the right of the Jew to 
statehood. However, no sooner was 
this right won when it had to be 
defended with the blood of a hand- 
ful of people against whom were 
arrayed the combined forces of the 
Arab world. Israel's survival and 
fate dominated the thoughts and 
proceedings of the assembly, and 
although inwardly confident in the 
ultimate victory of the embattled 
Jewish forces, the meeting adjourned 
on a note of anxiety. 

When the third plenary assembly 
convenes this year in Geneva, it 
will be confronted with many seri- 
ous problems. To note but a few- 
It will most certainly be called upon 
to attempt a clarification of the re- 
lationship between Israel and the 
Diaspora. Assuming as we must at 
this juncture of history that the 
overwhelming number of Jews will 
continue to live in the Diaspora and 
that they will want to live a creative 
Jewish life, the problem arises as to 
how Israel can help revitalize these 
communities and help them achieve 
their aims. On the other hand, 
there is the very real problem of 

THE BOAR AND 
CASTLE 

TASTY SANDWICHES 
DELICIOUS DRINKS 
CAR SERVICE 

West Market 
Opposite Canada Dry Plant 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 




MAJOR ABRAHAM S. HYMAN 

what Diaspora Jewry can do to 
strengthen the security and eco- 
nomic viability of Israel. 

The assembly will also be re- 
quired to deal with the liquidation 
of the problem arising out of the 
war, the problem of the statelessness 
of many Jews, the residual displaced 
persons problem, and the unresolved 
restitution and idenmification prob- 
lems in Germany, Austria, Greece 
and elsewhere. A problem that will 
also receive a thorough airing at the 
assembly is the plight of the Jews 
of Eastern Europe who are virtually 
sealed off from the rest of Jewry. 
The assembly will certainly concern 
itself with the international aspects 
of anti-Semitism and with preventa- 
tive and counteractive measures. 
Finally, in view of the significant 
contributions of the World Jewish 
Congress as a non-governmental con- 
sultative body of the United Na- 
tions, the asembly will want to ex- 
amine the record, assess what has 
been achieved in the codification of 

(Please Turn To Page 59) 

Good Furniture at Reasonable 
Prices 

BURTNER 
Furniture Co. 

312 South Elm St. Phone 8417 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



TILE j 

For Every Purpose \ 

HUGHEY | 
TILE CO. 

CONTRACTORS j 

For Estimates \ 

Dial 7090 | 

Burlington Road ! 

GREENSBORO, N. C. J 



Beaman% 

Inc. 

"Since 1922" 

• Venetian Blinds 

• Aluminum Window 
Screens 

• Storm Windows 

• Modernfold Doors 

Factory and Office 
1060 Battleground Dial 7373 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Visit a 



Guilford Dairy Bar j 



for Delicious 

ICE CREAM 



West Market Street Extension 



5 



J Summit Avenue Shopping Center J 
J 1616 West Lee Street 
J Battleground Ave. 

J GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Barksdale 
Studios 



Interior Designers 

Complete Decorative 
Service 

313 N. Aycock 2-4754 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 




RUG CLEANING • • MOTH PROOFING 

FREE ESTIMATES— PICK-UP AND DELIVERY SERVICE 

SERUNIAN & SONS 

"Serving Greensboro and Piedmont Area Since 1929" 
1311 Grove Street Dial 2-2294 



Call for... DAILY BREAD FLOUR ♦ JOY BRAND 
CORN MEAL ♦ SECURITY DOG FEED 

NORTH STATE MILLING COMPANY 



I 1 1 West Bragg 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



8615 



Two-Way Radio Dispatched Taxis 
Prompt, Courteous Service 
Dial 2-5112 




Blue Bird Taxi, 

Inc. 

229 East Sycamore St. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



For 

Style • Quality 
Economical Riding 
Your Best Buy Is 




SALES and SERVICE 
Come in or a Demonstration 

Ingram Motor Co. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



58 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



Crutchfield-Browning Drug Company 

Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 

"Qualify With a Reputation" 

357 North Elm St. Phone 3-5553 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



A RABBI'S DILEMMA 

(Continued From Page 12) 



QUALITY CLOTHING FOR MEN 

AND YOUNG MEN 
BOYS' DEPARTMENT - SECOND FLOOR 

younts-De^oe Go, 

r^WHEHE. QU ALITY IS HIGHER. THAN P H» C E. J fr 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



ADAMSON 

CADILLAC-OLDS COMPANY 

Sales and Service 

< 304 East Market Street Dial 6195 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



TILLMAN'S Cos ' Wus 15 p - Cen ' 

C. P. 



I SUPER MARKETS 



224 N. Elm St. 
2 I 14 Walker Ave. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



i 

1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



GATE CITY ROOFING CO. 

APPROVED BARRETT ROOFERS 
Bird Asphalt Shingles — Siding 

Tipton Place GREENSBORO, N. C. Call 2-3382 



Shell Furnace Oil 

... a high quality, superior heating oil 
with FOA-5X additive. 

CALL 2-4195 

ATLANTIC 
COAL & OIL CO. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 




Holiday Greetings 

NEESE COUNTRY SAUSAGE CO. 

Inc. 



0. COCKMAN PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

Contractors — Plumbing and Heating Supplies 

Service Beyond Installation 
902 Spring Garden Street Call 7149 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



soming of the romance into fruition. 
And on one bright evening the 
rabbi received a call from the syna- 
gogue president greeting him with 
the news that thev were about to 
become relatives through marriage. 
The young man, Dick, had just 
telephoned from the Big City that 
he was arriving tomorrow with a 
diamond ring for the young lady 
and that he would like the engage- 
ment announcement to be made at 
the ball which was shortly to take 
place at the community center. 
Naturally enough, the rabbi was not 
overjoyed at the prospect of becom- 
ing linked in family to the president 
under those circumstances. What 
irked him even more — because it 
posed for him one of the most diffi- 
cult problems in his rabbinic career 
— was the announcement by his 
about-to-be-acquired relative that he 
was marrying off his first daughter 
and that he would like his mechu- 
ten, the rabbi, to perform the nup- 
tials. 

This was a dynamite-laden prob- 
lem. To accept the invitation and 
remain silent would not only con- 
stitute a transgression of Jewish law 
but a violation of conscience and 



professional ethics. To reject the 
invitation would have meant for 
him packing bag and baggage and 
leaving town. Such a course would 
have been more than an indignity 
to his president — it would have been 
construed as an open hint that there 
was something "wrong with the 
shiduch. It would have lent cred- 
ence to the rumors. 

In due time the rabbi summoned 
sufficient courage to pose the prob- 
lem directly to the president. He 
informed him about the rumors that 
were circulating about his wife and 
of the impediments they were cre- 
ating toward his performing the 
nuptials. At the same time he as- 
sured the distraught mechuten that 
all obstacles would be eliminated if 
he could prove the falsity of the 
rumors or if he could produce evi- 
dence that his wife was duly con- 
verted to Judaism prior to the 
(Please Turn To Page 81) 

ATTENTION— WOMEN'S 
ORGANIZATIONS! 

Obtaining subscriptions or renew- 
als for the American Jewish Times- 
Outlook is an ideal way of raising 
money for your projects or general 
fund. Write for full particulars. 



UPTOWN STORAGE GARAGE 

S. W. WILLIAMS, Proprietor 
Gas, Oil, Tires — Open All Night 
Automobile Storage — 24-Hour Service — Day and Weekly Rates — 
Washing — Polishing — Lubricating — Battery — Tire Sales 
and Service — Road Service 

301 North Elm Street Dial 2-4577 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



DIAL 3-6835 

Hotel Pharmacy 

O. Henry Hotel Bldg. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Open from 7 A.M. to 11 P.M. 
Everyday 



GRAY OIL CO. 

and Service Station 

for 

€sso 

DEALER 

FUEL OIL 
and KEROSENE 

DIAL 2-4117 

PROMPT DELIVERY 
1322 Lexington Ave. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



PIEDMONT OFFICE 
SUPPLIERS 

Office Supplies 

203 N. Greene St. Dial 4-1561 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 

1 1 1 1 in 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 in ii ii ii ii ii i ii ■■ 1 1 ii ii i in i 

Bring Your Cars 
For Expert Repairing 

TO 

Kirk's Sineath 

Motor Company 

424 BATTLEGROUND 

24-Hour Wrecker Service 

Dial 2-3456 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiih' 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



59 



JONES 

AUTOMOTIVE CO. 

Wholesale 
Parts for Trucks - Cars 
303 N. Greene Dial 3-5555 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

MARTIN'S 
STUDIO 

I 12 E. Gaston Phone 7237 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



GREENE STREET 
DRUG COMPANY 

Special Attention Given 
to Prescriptions 

Drug Dept. — 2-5177 
Main Floor — 3-2170 

124 South Greene Street 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



SCOTT SEED CO. 

Seeds — Garden Tools 

o 

235 N. Greene St. Dial 3-2554 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



CHAMPION 
Storage & Trucking Co. 

207 Walker Ave. 
Dial 2-1547 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



DICK'S SHOE SHOP 
Best Quality Repairs 

208 North Elm Street 

Dial 2-2459 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



CORNATZER 
and MOCK 

Men's Wear 
121 West Market Street 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



FLEMING-SHAW 
TRANSFER CO. 

GENERAL HAULING 

"We Move Anything" 

310 E. Sycamore St. Phone 3-6934 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



THREE ASSEMBLIES- 
THREE MOODS 

(Concluded From Page 57) 

a set of principles designed to im- 
prove the moral climate of the 
world, and determine what might be 
done to accelerate the acceptance 
of these principles by the nations of 
the world. 

Despite the number and com- 
plexity of these problems, the third 
plenary assembly will approach its 
task with the feeling that none of 
these problems are insoluble. Aside 
from their justifiable pride in the 
fact that the past five years have 
demonstrated that the World Jewish 
Congress has effectively acted as a 
unifying force in Jewry, those who 
participate in this historic gathering 
will draw strength from two other 
sources: from the new stature which 
Jews have gained in their own eyes 
and in the eyes of the world as a 
result of the miraculous achieve- 
ments of the State of Israel, and 
from the conviction, reinforced bv 
the experiences of the Jews during 
the past two decades, that they are 
members of an imperishable people. 



F. J. McFADYEN PLUMBING CO. 




Dr. Herman Schlachet, a Polish physi- 
cian, and his wife, who fled from perse- 
cution in Poland and found refuge in 
the American sector of Vienna, are re- 
united in the U. S. with their son, 
Alexander, and daughter, Jenina, from 
whom they were separated for six years. 
HIAS, the Hebrew Immigrant Aid So- 
ciety, brought the son and daughter to 
the U. S. from England, where they 
had been living since the end of World 
War II. 



TEL AVIV (WNS) — A Jewish 
family which was repatriated to In- 
dia some months ago together with 
a group of Indian Jews who were 
unable to adjust themselves to life 
in Israel returned here this week 
from Bombay after eleven months 
of unsuccessful efforts to gain em- 
ployment. 

The head of the family, who first 
came to Israel some three years ago, 
vowed he would never again leave 
Israel. 



| Heating and Plumbing Contractors 

j 611 West Lee St. GREENSBORO, N. C. Dial 9953 



iUiMimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiisiimiEfciiiiimmiiiiLL' 

| DIAL 7209 | 

I CENTRAL I 

| Floral Gardens | 

= "Flowers for All Occasions" E 

| We Deliver | 

= 1907 Spring Garden Street ~ 
| GREENSBORO, N. C. | 

?l!lllllillllllII!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIISIIISEI!EEIIIlljllT: 



SASLOW'S 

Jewelry Store 

Greensboro's Largest 
Credit Jewelry Store 



i 



Season's Greetings 



j DAVID J. WHITE ! 

i i 

, Realtor \ 

I 

GREENSBORO, N. C. j 

i 



Established 1921 

RIERSON BROS. 
WELDING SHOP 

Electric and Acetylene 
Welding 

248 E. Sycamore Phone 2-0692 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



McFALLS 

SUNSET DRUG CO. 

Prescription Specialists 
1610 Madison Ave. Dial 2 5149 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



NATIONAL CASH 
REGISTER CO. 

O. L FRYMAN, 
Branch Manager 

116 East Market Street 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



:; AN0ERS0N-B0SWELL PATROL, Inc. j 

Complete Detective Service i 

Let us collect your delinquent accounts. J* 

Dial 3-2157 GREENSBORO, N. C. 405 N. Elm St. < 



DIXIE SALES CO. 

Automotive Service 

327 Battleground Avenue 
Phone 3-6964 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



NEW HOME 

Building Supply Co. 

Millwork 
Builders' Supplies 

625 S. Mendenhall Phone 2-4101 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



1 



MOORE ELECTRIC CO. 

Residential, Commercial and Industrial 
Contractors 

6l8'/ 2 S. Elm St. Dial 2-3182 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



.VA^v ,l v^^■.^".". ,, . a . ,i . l, .^■.■.■.".■.^^■.■.■.■.■.■.v^^■.^^^v^■.■.■.•.^^^^■.■A^^^ 

0AKW00D TRAILERS, Inc. 

Dealers in Fine Trailer Coaches 
AUTHORIZED SALES AND SERVICE FOR 
POPULAR KNOWN MAKES OF HOUSE TRAILERS 

High Point Rd. GREENSBORO, N. C. Dial 4-5488 



60 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



See BEANE for 

Lumber ♦ Plywood ♦ Windows ♦ Millwork 

BEANE LUMBER COMPANY 

516 Ashe St. — GREENSBORO — Phone 4-3221 
S. Fayetteville St. — ASHEBORO — Phone 4443 



SEBURN'S 

JEWELERS 

OUTSTANDING 

MAKES 

OF 

• SILVER 

• CHINA 

• GLASS 

• JEWELRY 

I 16 North Elm St. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Season's Greetings 
7. H. Light foot 



Bring Your Glasses fo 

CITY 

OPTICIANS 

Jefferson Building 
Dial 2-4693 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



miiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiii <— . 



THROUGHOUT 
THE YEAR 

Let One of Your 
Pleasures Be 

GRIFFIN 

PIES 

GRIFFIN BAKING GO. 

W. Market Ext. 3-3995 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



I 



I 



Season's Gretings and 
Best Wishes for a Very 
Happy Holiday 



NORMAN E. 
FOXWORTH 

Engraver and Designer 
to the Jewelry Trade 

306 Watson Building 

Dial 4-4055 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



IIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIilllllllMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII v>— .,—.o_„_„_„_ „_ „—„_„_„_„_,. 



'If you need a plumber bad, 
you wanf him good." 

Dial 6518 

WHITE 

Plumbing Co. 

for 

Repairs or installations 

240 E. Market St. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



In Greensboro or High Point 
USE OUR SERVICE 




HERTZ DRIV-UR-SELF 
SYSTEM LICENSEE 

121 S. Davie Dial 4-7101 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 

I 17 S. Wrenn Dial 7975 
HIGH POINT 



GALLOWAY BUICK CO. 

BUICK 

Sales 




ervice 



202 North Forbis GREENSBORO, N. C. Dial 2-3148 



PLAIN TALK 

(Concluded From Page 25) 

has great faith in printed matter, 
and by association he believes in 
people who write things for print 
. . . "Now you yourself are full of 
the years you have lived", he said. 
"The years haven't been lost in you. 
You have kept the years living and 
flourishing". 

I thanked Joe for this flattery 
and even more substantially. I 
handed him a quarter. My brief 
encounter with him had been worth 
at least 25 cents; since he had en- 
dowed me with the answer to my 
grandson's question: Where do the 
years go? 

"Yes, boy", I said to the child, 
"that's what becomes of all the 
years. They stay with us, in us, 
that is, or they get lost on account 
of the way we do with them. They 
are us, you and me and all of us. 
We make them or we wreck them 
and lose them". 

The bright child had another 
question: "If we can make years 
good all by ourselves why do we 
pray to God to give us a good new 
year?" 

I replied: "Oh, we try to make it 
easier for ourselves by putting it all 
on God, but it's really our job: To 
make the year good and a decent 
part of our lives". 

The child asked almost accus- 
ingly: "Grandpa, don't you believe 
in God? Why do you go to temple 
on the New Year, if you don't be- 
lieve in God. Why do you go to 
pray to him?" 

I replied: "It's my idea that God 
leaves it to us to make the years 
good by the way we live; to make 
them good and take them into our- 
selves to become part of our lives. 
He shows us the way. When we 
pray on Rosh Hashonah it's to ask 
God to keep showing us the right 
way to make the year good". 

The boy said he thought I must 
be pretty smart to find the right 
answer. 

"The fact is", I replied, "that it 
was a man named Joe who gave me 
the answer. I gave him a quarter 
for it and that's a big bargain. It's 
really worth a million dollars if 
people only understood it, but they 
don't. This Rosh Hashonah, as on 
all others, they will be putting the 
new year into God's hands to make 
it good for them. Anyway, now you 
know what becomes of all the 
years". 

Do It Now! Buy That 
Israel Bond! 



GRANTHAM 
HARDWARE CO. 

HARDWARE 
Building Materials 
I I I N. Greene St. 3-2873 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



E. M. DAVIS 

Expert Jewelry Repair 
and Engraving 

2071/2 w - Sycamore 2-1310 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



LINVILLE 
SERVICE STATION 

Sinclair HC 

242 S. Greene St. Dial 2-2941 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

HOME SPECIALTY 

FLOOR COVERINGS 
Shades and Blinds 

1300 Battleground Ave. - Dial 3-3736 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



J. A. WILLARD CO. 

Machine Work — Repairs 



210 S. Forbis St. Dial 8735 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



POWELL'S 

WALK-OVER 
SHOE SHOP 

I 15 South Elm Street 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



WBIG 

Your Columbia 
Broadcasting 
Station 

O. Henry Hotel Ph. 6125 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




SS'' 

US'. 



Anti-Defamation League Chairmen of B'nai B'rith District 5 and District 7 meet 
in Atlanta to program activities for the year ahead. Extensive plans to emplov 
the manpower of the more than 200 B'nai B'rith Lodges in the South in proj- 
ects designed to better human relations were outlined during an extensive two- 
day session. Pictured above reading from left to right: Seated, George Fagin, 
Oklahoma City, District 7 ADL Chairman and George J. Talianoff, Miami, 
District 5 ADL Chairman. Standing: Alfred E. Smith, Charlotte, District 5 
ADL Co-Chairman, Alexander F. Miller, ADL Southern Director and Arthur J. 
Levin, Director of ADL Atlanta Regional Office. 

WILLIAMSTON, N. C. 



Mrs. Irving M. Marg> 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Margolis 
spent a few days with their son and 
daughter-in-law Dr. and Mrs. Rich- 
ard Margolis, in Winston-Salem. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Pittman and 
son, James, vacationed in New York 
City and Atlantic City. They also 
joined relatives for a week-end at 
Myrtle Beach. 

Mrs. Hinda Scheib, and sons, and 
Mrs. B. Goldstein of Windsor at- 
tended the Pidyen-ha-ben of Mrs. 
Scheib's grandson in Reidsville. The 




TOPS IN COOKING 
J see them at your nearest ;« 




Gas St 



emce 



olis, Correspondent 

happy parents are Mr. and Mrs. 
Dave Levine. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Pittman have 
had as their guests Mr. and Mrs. 
Ted Fleischman and daughter 
Jackie, of Anderson, S. C. 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Margolis and 
daughters, Sandra and Gail, have re- 
turned from Myrtle Beach. They 
also spent a week-end at Wrights- 
ville en route home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Zemon and 
son, Jacob, returned from Staun- 
ton, Va., where they attended the 
funeral of Mrs. Zemon's mother, 
Mrs. H. Greenstone. The com- 
munity extends its sincere sympathy 
to the family. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Levin have 
returned home from South Caro- 
lina where Mr. Levin was most of 
the summer, in the peach market. 
Before returning home they vaca- 
tioned in the western part of the 
State, and visited their grandchil- 
dren in Mt. Gilead and Chapel Hill. 

James Pittman attended the Jew- 
ish Youth Institute at Wildacres. 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Meyers 
and daughter, Diane, of Hunting- 
ton, Long Island, are visiting Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank Margolis. The visit 
is an important milestone in Diane's 
life — her first visit to her William- 
ston grandparents — and a most 
happy occasion for them. 

Mrs. B. Goldstein and son, Mey- 
er, are spending ten days in Balti- 
more and New York. 



The Following Firms in . . . 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 



LINCOLN 



MECKLENBURG MOTORS 

Incorporated 

Fully trained SALES and SERVICE per- 
sonnel, plus the newest factory-ap- 
proved equipment for your convenience 
and satisfaction. 




Sales and Service 
Third at Poplar St. 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 
MERCURY 



Dial 4-3073 



Carolina Concrete Pipe Company 

Incorporated 

Plain and Reinforced Concrete Pipe 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. — COLUMBIA, S. C. 
LILESVILLE, N. C. 

Charlotte Address: Derita Road — Dial 8874 



jUtr^to^tt Jtosral Home 

INCORPORATED 

24-Hour Ambulance Service — Dial 4-6421 



727 Morehead Street 



Charlotte, N. C. 



Rent a Car! 

Rent it now and drive it 
yourself . . . anwhere . . . 
for business or pleasure. Go 
anywhere you please ... no 
red tape. 

We Also Rent Trucks 

Scarbrough's 
Drive-It Yourself, 

Inc. 

212 W. Fourth St. Tel. 3-4513 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 




Charlotte's Most Complete 
Department Store 

700 North Tryon 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



62 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



The following nationally known and advertised products can be 
purchasd from your grocery: 



Jolly Time Pop Corn 

Braswell's Artichoke Pickle. 
Artichoke Relish, Pear Pre- 
serves, Watermelon Rind 
Pickle 

Puss and Boots Cat Food 
Uncle Ben's Converted Rice 
Calgon and Calgonite 
Church's Grape Juice 
Church's Apple Juice 
Durkee's Famous Dressing, 

Stayfresh Coconut, Spices 

and Extract 
Green Giant Products — Peas, 

Corn, Asparagus 
KANANA BANANA FLAKES 



Py-O-My Cake Mixes 
Liberty Maraschino Cherries 

and Glace Fruits 
Ocean Spray Cranberry Sauce 
La Choy Chinese Foods 
Swanson's Boned Chicken, 

Boned Turkey, Fricassee 
Underwood Deviled Ham 
Pik-Nik Shoestring Potatoes 
Wildroot Shampoo and Tonic 
Mentholatum 
Ammident Tooth Paste 
Ammident Tooth Paste with 

Chlorophyll 
Py-Co-Pay Tooth Brushes 
'For babies and infants — and others" 



Perma Starch 

Swanson's Frozen Chicken Pie 
Bridgeport Brass Insect Bomb 
Goodaire 

Morgan- Jones, Inc., Dish 
Cloths, Dish Towels, and 
Pot Holders 
Swanson Frozen Beef Pies 
Easy-Off 
Oven Cleaner 
"Green Jay" 
Grass Seed 

Braswell's Fig and Peach 
Preserves 



IF YOUR GROCER DOES NOT STOCK THESE PRODUCTS WRITE 

THE HOUSE OF STOKELY, P. O. Box 98, Charlotte, N. C. 

AND GIVE US HIS NAME AND WE WILL BE GLAD TO CALL AND HAVE 
HIM STOCK THESE PRODUCTS FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE 



Duke Photo Co. 

"DUKE" SANCHEZ, Manager 




• Weddings © Aerials 

• Commercial • Portraits 

• Kodachromes • News 

% Televisions Movies 

824 E. Trade St. — Dial 3-8230 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



CRANE CO 

m PLUMBING 

• HEATING 

• VALVES 
% PIPING 

1307 W. Morehead 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



I BUTLER 

SEAFOOD 

''''Everything in Fresh 
Seafoods" 

J 919 South McDowell St. 

J Just Across from the Addison 
Telehone 5-4409 



N. G. SPEIR 

incorporated 

Home Loans 
Real Estate Sales 

130 East Fourth Street 

Telephone 4-5386 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 




Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Zemon 
have had as their guest their neph- 
ew, Harold Greenstone, of Waynes- 
boro, Va. 

Jacob Zemon, together with a 
party of friends, has returned from 
a trip to New York City. 



CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

The Omega Chapter of Tau Ep- 
silon Phi, at the University of North 
Carolina, will hold its second bi- 
annual alumni reunion on October 
30th, 31st, and November 1st. This 
will be the week-end of the Caro- 
lina-Tennessee football game. It is 
expected that Tep men from all 
parts of the country will be on hand 
for the affair. 

Plans for the events are: Friday: 
5:30-6:30, Supper at the house. 6:30- 
' til — For those able to be with us on 
Fridav night, there will be informal 
"bull sessions" around the house. 
Saturdav: 11:00-1:00— Brunch at the 
house. 2:00-4:00 — Game. 4:00-6:00 
—"Set-ups" at the house. 7:30-12:00 
— Dinner dance at the Chapel Hill 
Country Club. This will not be for- 
mal. 1:00-? — "Partying at the 
house." Sunday: 12:30 — Lunch at 
the house." 

Those wishing to make reserva- 
tions, should inquire at the follow- 
ing places: The Washington Duke 
or the Malbourne Hotel in Durham; 
The Sir Walter Hotel, The Caro- 
lina Hotel, or the Andrew Johnson 
Hotel in Raleigh. There are also 
several motor courts in and around 
Chapel Hill. 



HIGH POINT, N. C. 

Mrs. Roberta Robinson, Correspondent 

High Point welcomes three fami- 
lies of new comers to our city. Mr. 
and Mrs. Phillip Zaslavsky, Mr. and 
Mrs. David Gelber, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Max Weiss. We hope they 
will enjoy our community as much 
as we will enjoy having them. 



RADIO TELEVISION 
& APPLIANCE CO. 

Expert Television Installations 
and Service 

1300 E. 4th St. Tel. 2-2435 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Rabbi Gold, Vice-President of 
the North Carolina Association of 
Rabbis, has returned from a leader- 
ship conference at Wild Acres at 
which time Miss Rubee delivered 
an outstanding series of enlighten- 
ing lectures on the methods of con- 
ducting Sunday School. 

Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. 
Max Friedman on the celebration 
of their twenty-fifth wedding anni- 
versary. May they have many, 
many more such joyous occasions. 

High Point's B'nai B'rith, Ladies 
Aid and Women's Council are busi- 
ly planning their years' program. 
They will soon have their first meet- 
ing of the year. 

The High Point congregation ex- 
tends best wishes for the new year 
to all of our friends and readers. 



WILSON, N. C. 

Hanar Shor, Correspondent 

What an active and eager group 
Wilson has become since our Tem- 
ple will be in readiness for the 
Holy Days. 

Plans are being made for the 
Dedication which will take place on 
November 8th. 

A special meeting of Hadassah- 
Sistcrhood was held on August 
25th at the home of our chairman, 
Mrs. Bill Golding. 

A very active intinerary is in 
store for us for the forthcoming 
year, but everyone is very proud to 
participate in carrying their load. 
We feel certain Hadassah and our 
Sisterhood will profit by our unlim- 
ited labors. 

Mrs. Joe Hanchrow, chairman of 
our Sunday School Committee, is 
working like a beaver in rounding 
up teachers. 

Mr. Meyer Brown is at home con- 
valescing. We wish you, Meyer, 
continued improvement and your 
health fully regained. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Summerfield 
arc vacationing at Baltimore and 
Atlantic City. 

QUERY-SPIVEY- 
McGEE CO. 

Purina Chows — Baby Chicks 
Hardware 

Phone 3-3282 
600 South College Street 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



O. F. "BILL" WILLIAMS, Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 

INTERSTATE CONSTRUCTION CO. 



2 1 I Atherton 



Commercial and Industrial Contractors 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Dial 3-0250 



Eat 

FOREMOST 
Ice Cream 



• Delicious • 

• Healthful • 



Drink 
FOREMOST 
Milk 



FOREMOST DAIRIES. Inc. 

1224 North Tryon Dial 2-71 16 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



UNTO THEM A SON IS BORN 

(Continued From Page 27) 



Tvi's voice was controlled, "The 
child will be born soon." 
"Put her down." 

He set Elana on her shaky feet, 
and she leaned against him gulping 
in the hot night air, breathing 
deeply, the perspiration pouring 
down her body, the pain rising in 
waves more intense than the heat. 
The Polish doctor came up quickly 
behind them and examined Elana 
in the moonlight below the one 
low-hanging unshaded electric light 
bulb. "It will be some time yet," 
he decided. 

She wanted to. Tvi and the 
doctor went back into the steam- 
ing hold of the ship, and the soldiers 
helped Elana. She stopped only 
once to let a rising pain reach its 
climax, and she leaned over herself 
until blessed relief came. 

In the hospital bay, the smell of 
the medicaments was pleasant to 
her nostrils, and she moved among 
the dimly lighted beds easily. The 
nurse showed her where the shower 
was, and gave her a sliver of soap 
and a fresh towel. She had not 
remembered how good, how won- 
derfully good a brisk cool shower 
could be. Clean and dry, in an old 
white shirt, she lay down on the 
the unsheeted mattress of the one 
empty cot in sick bay. How glorious 
to be up off the floor, with a few 
feet of space on each side of her, 
and the air smelling of ether, alco- 
hol and iodine instead of sweat and 
dry stale food. 

Something crawled on her leg. 
She slapped at it and brought it to 

Pilot Loan and 
Finance Co. 

I 19 East Market St. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 

AS MEMBERS OF 

MIDWEST STOCK EXCHANGE 

we offer our facilities for 
the execution of orders for 

listed securities 
on all principal 
exchanges 



R. S. DICKSON & CO. 



Investment Securities 
HOME OFFICE: CHARLOTTE 

Raleigh Richmond Columbia Greenville 
Atlanta New York Chicago 



her eyes to examine it. It was a 
large roach. She began to cry hys- 
terically, and in a few minutes the 
Polish doctor was close by her, his 
horn-rimmed glasses making his face 
like an owl's. His voice was low 
and sympathetic and he spoke in his 
poor English, "Is it such a bad 
time?" 

"No," she shook her head, still 
crying. 

"How often come the pains? How 
soon?" 

"I've had several since I came 
down," she managed to answer. 






The Chief Rabbi of Israel, Isaac H. 
Herzog, has "acclaimed with joy" plans 
of American Jews to obtain State of 
Israel Bond subscriptions in synagogues 
"precisely on the Holiest Days, Rosh 
Hashonah and Yom Kippur." Empha- 
sizing the "special importance" of ob- 
taining Israel Bond subscriptions dur- 
ing the High Holy Day services, Rabbi 
Herzog stated that "Israel is undoubt- 
edly the work of special Divine Provi- 
dence" and urged "that the Houses of 
God should echo this great living proof 
of the Providence of God, our State 
of Israel." 

LEFLER 

CONCRETE BLOCK CO. 

Concrete Products 
SEPTIC TANK PRODUCTS 
CONCRETE PIPE 

646 State St. Dial 5-3359 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



WHITE OAK 
DAIRY 



Buttermilk — Chocolate 
Homogenized Milk 
Cream 



Sha ron Road Tel. 2-4601 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



A. Z. PRICE & ASSOCIATES, 

Distributors for 

G. E. Heating and Air-Conditioning 

Telephone 6-2466 206 S. Church St. 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



DIAL 4-4844 



STORKLINE DY-DEE WASH 



! • Sanitary • Economical 



Convenient • Safe 



| 

Dy-Dee Wash — Double Protection j 

611 Atando Ave. CHARLOTTE, N. C. ( 

i 

JAMES J. HARRIS & COMPANY 



Johnson Building 



'Insurance' 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Dial 5-7311 



INDUSTRIALAIRE CO. 

Air-Conditioning — Heating — Ventilation 
ENGINEERS and CONTRACTORS 

Commercial — Industrial 

1600 Hutchinson Avenue Dial 3-3328 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 




LEDBETTER'S 

SHOE STORE 



228 N. Tryon 



Tel. 4-6912 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Hardware Mutual Fire Insurance Co. 



118 4th St. 



of the Carolinas 

"Safety — Service — Savings" 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Dial 2-2119 



F. & R. GOAL AND OIL COMPANY 

COAL — FUEL OIL • Order Your Supply Now 



Phone 3-6177 



624 S. Cedar St. 



CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 



Pritchard Paint & Glass Co. 



Asheville 



CHARLOTTE 
North Carolina 



Raleigh 



64 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



THOS. GRIFFITH & COMPANY 

Since 1875 Insurance Headquarters 

ALL LINES OF INSURANCE 

(EXCEPT LIFE) 

226 South Tryon St. CHARLOTTE, N. C. Phones 2-4195 - 2-4196 



CLEVELAND CLEANERS 

Garments — Slip Covers — Draperies — Furs 

QUICK PICK-UP AND DELIVERY 
Dial 5-5367 Dial 2-2413 

509 East Trade 3209 N. Caldwell 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 



H. & S. LUMBER CO. 

Lumber and Building Products 
520 Dowd Road Dial 2-5191 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 




CAFETERIAS 

Charlotte- Asheville-Raleigh'Chattanooga-Knoxville-Atlanta-Roanoke 
Greensboro 

GUY M. BEATY & CO. 

Boiler and Pipe Coverings • Asbestos Mill Boards 

520 Elliott Dial 3-8625 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 



| _ _ 

NEW CONSTRUCTION — FIXTURES — REPAIRS j 
Residential — Commercial — Industrial j 



j George D. Stanford Electric Company 1 



Dial 5-1914 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



I 

Statesville Rd. j 



NEW WAY LAUNDRY and CLEANERS 

Cash and Carry Stations All Over Town 

935 East Ninth Street Dial 3-3721 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 



Anderson Electric and Supply Co. 

# Residential Lighting Fixtures of Character for any Style or Type Home 

# Fluorescent Lighting Fixtures for Your Stores or Offices 

Electrical Contractors 
134 N. College St. CHARLOTTE, N. C. Dial 4-4637 



"I give you a shot of morphine. 
The French doctor has been sent 
for. She will be here soon." 

From somewhere Elana heard a 
strange animal scream. After a 
moment she saw the doctor's face 
receding, wavering through a mist. 
"What was that?" she asked. 

"You," he answered, "that was 
you, Elana." 

"Oh, no," she sighed, "I promised 
I wouldn't." The pain came in like 
a wave at the beach, rolling up over 
her, and she clenched her fists, wait- 
ing for its climax. She could hear 
the lapping of the sea against the 
ship, and she felt a new kind of 
drugged swimming, her arms and 
legs going off oddly in opposite 
directions. When she opened her 
eyes again, the French woman doc- 
tor was standing near her, holding 
the squirming infant aloft, and the 
child's vigorous cries sang through 
the somber night. After all, Elana 
told herself grinning foolishly, mil- 
lions of babies were born in worse 
circumstances, and all she had 
needed was a little courage. 

The nurse took the baby, and the 
doctor turned to Elana. 

"You have a son." 

"I'm so happy," Elana said in a 
ridiculous giggly voice. "I'm so 
glad.'" 

"Of course, you are," the doctor 
agreed, working busily. 

"Have you children of your own?" 
Elana asked. 

"I'm not married." She went to 
the wash basin and scrubbed her 
hands and came back talking. 



i 



FAVELL'S 

SHOE SHOP 

Shoe Service 
of Character" 

I 15 E. 5th St. Dial 4-1733 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



j 



"When I was young, I thought one 
had to make a choice between the 
biological satisfactions and the in- 
tellectual." 

"And now that you are older?" 
Elana asked sleepily, not sure she 
had heard the doctor correctly. 

"Sometimes I still think so. Isn't 
that what your people on the 
destroyers are doing? They could go 
ashore in France and have com- 
fortable plumbing, stretch out on a 
mattress, sleep between sheets, start 
accumulating a lot of material 
things .... Instead . . ." 

"Instead they are visionaries, you 
think." 

"I did not say that." 

Impulsively, Elana took the doc- 
tor's soft womanish hand, "Thank 
you for the drugs." 

The doctor covered her hand. 
"Did you think I'd let you suffer?" 

Elana felt suddenly, strangely bel- 
ligerent. "Don't you think all the 
people on these ships are suffering? 
Do you think that suffering is per- 
haps good for their souls? Do you 
think patience and endurance are 
ennobling qualities? Do you think 
pain and anguish gives character?" 

"I gave you the drugs, didn't I?" 

Tears of weariness and remorse 
came to Elana's eyes. Why was she 
quarreling with her good friend? 
"And you brought me sheets and 
you gave me comfort . . ." 

"Elana," the French woman 
spoke slowly, "patience and endur- 
ance, even suffering give a human 
being stature — if he is triumphant 

(Please Turn To Page 86) 



A Happy New Year 

PHILIP F. 
HOWERTON 
AGENCY 

CONNECTICUT LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 

Johnston Building 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



. A A A A A ■ 



W. H. HOBBS, Inc. 

Plumbing and Heating 
Contractors 

1215 Central Ave. Dial 2-1 I 19 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



HOME 

APPLIANCES CO. 

Electrical Appliances 
1522 East Fourth St. Dial 5-3756 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 




109 W. Third St. Phone 3-4158 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

Phone 3-6191 

C. D. Keith Garage 

Wrecker Service 

S. Tryon and Jackson Terrace 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



65 



ISRAEL'S CITIES— A BLENDING 
OF PAST AND FUTURE 

By D. SCHOCHER 



Israel cities have personality. 
Considering especially the small 
area of the Jewish state, the towns 
manifest striking individuality. 
Even the smaller towns seem to 
possess their own special character. 
In the dark, one can tell the dif- 
ference between Jerusalem and Tel 
Aviv or between Tel Aviv and 
Haifa. 

Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, only an 
hour's ride apart, are like children, 
one of whom resembles his mother's 
family and the other's his father's. 
Jerusalem is a Picasso painting. 
Geometrical designs. Hills and val- 
leys juxtaposed. Many planes and 
oft times startling colors. 

Tel Aviv is a cover of the Satur- 
day Evening Post. Lying beside 
the Mediterranean, all in one 
plane. Modern. Comfortable. The 
thoughts vou have in Jerusalem are 
not the thoughts you have in Tel 




j Bet-R-Way Cleaning ( 

t j 

j 716 South Brevard j 

! Telephone 3-3135 j 

| CHARLOTTE, N. C. j 



For the Best in 
PRINTING 

CALL 2-6093 




SHEPHERD 
BROS., Inc. 

121 South Church Street 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Aviv. Nor the clothing you wear. 
In winter, you are in your over- 
coat in Jerusalem, huddling beside 
the naphtha heater. In Tel Aviv, 
your white suit will do and you can 
go bathing. 

Jerusalem is antiquity plus the 
future. The Wailing Wall, the 
Tower of David, the streets a pano- 
rama of the world, monks, and 
priests of all faiths, rabbis in 
kapotes. In the cafes sit diplomats, 
politicians, men with schemes. 
Dreamers who will prove to you 
that the Lowdermilk plan will 
bring those lakes to Jerusalem, 
which the Bible says are due in the 
Great Day. 

Tel Aviv is bubbling, throbbing, 
dynamic. It is as pragmatic as the 
Perek which Jews read on Sabbath 
afternoon. It repeats with Hillel, 




Dr. Milton Rosenbaum, Professor of 
Psychiatry at the University of Cincin- 
nati College of Medicine and one of 
the nation's foremost psychiatric teach- 
ers, has been in Israel to assist in the 
establishment of a new Department of 
Psychiatry at the Hebrew University- 
Hadassah Medical School. 



Bakes Better 

Pies -:- 
Cakes -:- 



Rolls 
Biscuits 




iHTERSMHIUJNGtd 

StwcfwL 




On Sale at 

your grocer 



P. C. GODFREY, Inc. 

Plumbing and Heating 

1816 Rozzell's Ferry Road 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Dial 4-8605 



i — .i 



STOCKTON MOTOR CO. 



j 

I Sales 

' 1525 South Mint Street 



DIAMOND "T" TRUCKS 



I 



— service j 

Dial 4-5589 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



PERRY NEON 
SIGN CO. 

2217 N. Tryon St. 

Phones 2-3405 and 4-7289 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



POUND & MOORE 
COMPANY 

"It It's for the Office — We Have It" 

304 S. Tryon St. Phone 5-7751 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



MARTIN 
Transfer & Storage Co. 

1138 North Caldwell 

Phone 4-1925 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



McKEE REALTY Co. 

Real Estate — Insurance 

123 W. 4th Street Dial 3-1134 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Season's Greetings 

GARRISON 
& HOPKINS 

Plumbing and Heating 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 




REMEMBER THIS SEAL . . . 
IT'S YOUR ASSURANCE OF THE BEST 



PARKER-GARDNER 
COMPANY 

Radios — Radio Phonographs 
Television — Pianos 
Records — Sheet Music 

118 West Trade St. Dial 8257 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Better Be Safe Than Sorry 
INSURE — NOW 
with 

W. E. PRICE & SON 

166 W. Third St. Dial 2-5037 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Southern Warehouse 
& Distributing Corp. 

934 N. Poplar 5-2531 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



ALLEN ELECTRIC 

COMPANY 

Residential and Commercial 
Wiring and Lighting Fixtures 

417 Pecan St. Dial 5-8406 

CHARLOTTE. N. C. 



Dial 4-7553 



Standard Insulating Co. 

Insulators 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



205 E. Bland St. 




ELMONICO 



BBS TAURANT 



66 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



SHUMAN-YORK CO. 




COMMERCIAL — INDUSTRIAL — RESIDENTIAL 
AIR CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION 
Sales and Service 



126 West Tremont Ave. 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Dial 6-3631 



AL BROWNE'S UPTOWN SERVICE 

Tires, Batferies, Accessories — Pure OH Products 

Phone 4-4975 433 E. Trade 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 




Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for the New Year 

J. FRANK HARKEY NURSERY 

Evergreens — Flowering Shrubs — Ornamental Trees 

Sardis Rd. North Dial 3-1606 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



%\\t guar's ||eaii 

Drive-In Restaurant 

Fine Food and Service 
1426 E. Morehead, Charlotte, N. C. 



It's 



CASKIE 



for the best paper 

CASKIE PAPER CO. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



"If not now when?" It cares not 
for antiquity and is not concerned 
with far awav future. 

Haifa is a sister citv which has 
some of the features of Jerusalem 
and some of Tel Aviv. Haifa has 
the mountain and the sea. Standing 
in her port, now being enlarged by 
funds of Americans subscribed to 
Israel bonds, one gets a sense of 
the flow of the world. Perhaps this 
is the great bridge between the 
west and the newlv awakening 
giant of Asia! 

"Jerusalem is the city of yester- 
day, Tel Aviv the city of today and 
Haifa the citv of tomorrow," savs 
the epigram. Abba Hushi, Mayor 
of Haifa, talks of building the 
broadest boulevard in the world 
and plans a free port for Haifa. 

Beersheba, gateway to the des- 
ert, five years ago was a small hash 
of Arab mud hovels, but it goes 
back to the primeval days of Israel's 
past. It is the city associated with 
the patriarch Abraham who so- 
journed there attracted by the fact 
that he found water there. He dug 
seven wells, hence the same Beer- 
sheba. Mr. Henrv Morgenthau, Jr., 
head of the Israel Bond campaign, 
visiting Beersheba last year picked 
up a handful of the vellow sand 
and let it pass slowly through his 
hand, saving, "This is part of the 
fortune of Israel." Not the water, 
but the sands near Beersheba, 
which have been found rich in 
kaolin and for a varietv of glass- 
making purposes, are the attraction 
of Beersheba todav. 

Elath, farthermost outpost of the 
Ncgeb is but an infant town yet, 
but it has the seeds of growth. 
Elath is an earlv rising town. At 
six in the morning, everyone is at 
work. Later in the dav, it becomes 



very warm. It is best to take ad- 
vantage of the cool of the early 
morning and knock off later when 
the sun comes down in all of its 
intensity. The nights are cool and 
if the afternoons are very warm, you 
can go fishing. Catch a shark or 
two. At Lake Kinnereth, there is 
sardine fishing. It's very different 
at Elath. The Israelis have ideas 
you can do things with sharks. 
Their skins make good leather for 
shoes and for handbags and they 
are a rich source of vitamins. 
Sharks are tricky too. Everyone 
knows what to be "a shark at cards" 
means. Perhaps it's a good place 
for poker players. 

Nearby Elath are the ancient 
copper mines of King Solomon, 
discovered by Dr. Nelson Glueck 
in the course of archaeological re- 
search. 

Elath has become a quasi official 
testing ground and laboratory for 
the conquest of the desert. Here 
scientists are testing flowers and 
plants suitable for the Negeb. 
Elath boasts of a unique Desert 
Museum. 

Caesaria, once famed for its 
amphitheatre and Hellenic lavish- 
ness is rising from its ruins destined 
apparently in its present reincarna- 
tion to simpler splendors as a fish- 
ing center. A huge fishing wharf 
has been completed. 

Tiberias, to whose health-giving 
spas the Romans travelled in an- 
cient days is another town destined 
to greater growth. Safed, in the 
Upper Galilee has a beauty all of 
its own and it too is developing a 
peculiar uniqueness. For long as- 
sociated as a veritable capital of 
Cabalistic and mystical Judaism, 
today it has become a rendezvous 
for Israeli artists. 



CAROLINA RESTAURANT SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

"The House That Undersells" 
COMPLETE RESTAURANT SUPPLIES and EQUIPMENT 

220 S. College St. Dial 4-3269 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



NEW 




TRUCKS 



INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER CO. 



1315 Hutchinson Avenue Dial 4-2851 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A GREEN NURSE 

By RUTH LASKER 



Watch Hadassah's public health 
nurse go down the main street of 
Jerusalem's Mea Shearim, or the 
sukh (market) of the Bukharin 
Quarter, or the big courtyard of the 
Hungarian Houses. You can recog- 
nize her easily; she wears a green 
uniform and carries a big leather 
case, and it takes her a long time to 
move on. She is stopped every few 
feet either by an old patient ex- 
pressing his gratitude or by a po- 
tential one telling his troubles. 

"Come to the clinic and tell me 
all about it," says the nurse, extri- 
cating herself from the handclasp 
of a wrinkled babushka. She is cor- 
nered a few steps farther by an old 
man who wants injections "like 
Haim got." Finally she reaches the 
shabby home of the first bed-patient 
on her day's schedule, where she 
supplies medication and spreads 
good cheer. 

Ruth Alishovsky Halevi is one of 
Hadassah's eleven Green Nurses, 
who bring medical aid to the inhabi- 
tants of Jerusalem's poorer districts 
and nearby maabarot and hill settle- 
mentst. In addition to their visiting 
nurse duties, they staff a number of 
clinics to which patients flock each 
day with a variety of real and imag- 
ined ailments and with abounding 
confidence. 

In Beth Israel, where Ruth works, 
the people live as they lived many 
decades ago — in ghetto-like, light- 
less and airless, dilapidated build- 
ings, close to the Jordan frontier. 
They took a terrific beating during 
the fighting. 

Ruth didn't always work there. 
In fact, for sixteen months Ruth 



didn't work at all, because she had 
her own baby to care for. Then she 
began to wonder where she would 
be more useful — at home or in the 
nursing service; and decided that her 
years of training as a nurse and mid- 
wife at Hadassah's nursing school 
should not be wasted. Besides, she 
was needed. 

"If I work," she told her engineer 
husband, Moshe Halevi, "and get a 
full-time maid, we'll probably neith- 
( Please Turn To Page 71) 




Born in The Hague, Holland, 21 
years ago, Helen Mirjam Pinto 
has wandered, homeless, through 
France, Spain, Portugal, Madeira, 
Angola, and Indonesia, before 
finally arriving in the safe haven 
of the United States with the 
assistance of HIAS, the Hebrew 
Immigrant Aid Society. Miss Pin- 
to spent three years at slave 
Jabor In a Japanese concentra- 
tion camp in Java. After libera- 
tion she returned to The Hague 
and worked as a secretary in the 
United States Embassy there. 
Still in The Hague are her father, 
mother, and three younger broth- 
ers, whom HIAS is preparing "to 
assist in their migration to this 
country. Miss Pinto, who hopes 
to support herself by secretarial 
work and her knowledge of Ian- 
guages, will live with an uncle In 
New Jersey. 



1 
I 

i 

V 

I 



WALKERS 

DRUG STORE 



S-.o££?& — _ — J ._r,-' : r •• ■ ■* ^ £/JV/C£ 

PHONE 3-4166(4/ ^ TRVON T ™ ST. 



MACK MOTOR TRUCK CORP. 



Sales 

228 Dal+on Ave. 



MACK TRUCKS SerWce 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 5-2571 



-The NEW 



Carrier 



WEATHERMAKER 
AIR CONDITIONER' 



Cool Comfort for Stores, Offices, Shops, Homes 

tor Installation and Service write or phone 

ROSS & WITMER, Inc. 

1641 W. Morehead St. Dial 5-3374 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 



j HOME FEDERAL SAVINGS 



& LOAN ASSOCIATION 



I Loans — Home Financing 

j Insured Savings 

j 116 East 4th Street 

j CHARLOTTE, N. C. 




ft i 



Phone 2-41 17 



FRANK F. JONES - "BILL" SPARKS 

THE Real Estate Men 

Real Estate Investment Brokers and Counselor 
508 Independence Bldg. Phone 6-4466 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



LEO 

PHELAN 

Real Estate 
Insurance 

Piedmont Bldg. 
Dial 8774 
Charlotte, N. C. 



RUGS and CARPETS 

CLEANED 
Wall to Wall Carpets 
Cleaned on Your Floor 

Complete Household 
Cleaning 
Mothproofing & Repairing 
All Rugs Re-Sized 

Charlotte 
Floormaster Co. 

Dial 4-8430 
1721 N. Davidson St. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



C. V. STRAWN 
& SON 

General Contractors 



3000 Wilkinson Boulevard 
Phone 3-5871 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Fisherman's Net 

Shrimp and Oysters 
Vz FRIED CHICKEN 



FRESH FISH 
(All You Can Eat) 



With Slaw — French Fries 
Hush Puppies 

Mon. thru Wed. — Reserved for 

PARTIES 
Thurs. thru Sat. — 6 P.M.-ll P.M. 

FOR ORDERS TO GO 
AND PARTY RESERVATIONS 
DIAL 5-4524 

3101 Tuckaseege Road 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



j Sno-White Launderers & Dry Gleaners, Inc. 

1 J. J. FELLERS, Manager 

j 20 Per Cent Discount Cash and Carry — "The Fastest Service in Town' 

, Open 7:30 A.M. to 6 P.M. daily including Saturday 

j 1107 East Fourth Street Telephone 3-8885 

j CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 

: WWtffi%?$&&^gffi?$^%$imWWWWWfi. :5;::m': v3::':.;'i: : 'WW {' " 'W : j"-: WW " w 

Fidelity Van and Storage Company, Inc. 



Long Distance 
HOUSEHOLD MOVING AND STORAGE 

200 West 29th Street Phone 4-5316 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



68 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



The Following Firms in . . . 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 



^°< v -"v,, , in 



Block; 





THE WILMINGTON SAVINGS 
and TRUST COMPANY 



TRUSTS 



COMMERCIAL 




SAVINGS 



WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



YOPP FUNERAL HOME 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

AMBULANCE SERVICE 

DIAL 6666 WILMINGTON, N. C. 



( sr$*> I 



You taste 

\ 




its quality 




BOTTieD UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COIA COMPANY BY 



Wilmington Coca - Cola Bottling Works, fnc. 

WILMINGTON. NORTH CAROLINA 




These students peer through microscopes supplied by Pioneer Women, the Women's 
Labor Zionist Organization of America, through its fund raising activities in the 
United States: and Canada. The agricultural school Hadera, is maintained by Pioneer 
Women through its sister organization, the Working Women's Council in Israel. 
There 200 students receive a general education as well as agricultural training. Most 
of the graduates become farmers. 

FIGHTING THE NAZI LEGACY 

(Continued From Page 43) 



UN work as of utmost importance, 
it has never fallen prey to the illu- 
sion that the UN constitutes the 
panacea for all Jewish ills. The 
nature of anti-Semitism, hclonging 
as it does more often than not to 
the domain of psychopathology, has 
proven too complex to he success- 
fully combatted solely through fur 
thering principles of equality or 
fighting discrimination. 

The WJC has hailed and coop- 
erated in all campaigns to root out 
the evil of anti-Semitism. But it 
has kept such campaigns and efforts 
in proper perspective. It has con- 
stantly stressed the fact that anti 
Semitism must be regarded and 
fought as a rooted historical phe- 
nomenon. Therefore, the WJC has 
never relaxed its unflagging atten- 
tion and investigation of any and 
all manifestations of anti-Semitism. 
It has promptly intervened to curb 
and frustrate anti-Semitic incidents 
and campaigns, without awaiting the 
result of the action of the UN or 
other anti-bias bodies. 

The WJC is keenly aware that 
due to the new techniques of com- 
munication, anti - Semitic propa- 
ganda can now be spread all over 
the globe with much more facility 
and less expense than in previous 
years. A case in point is the Swed- 
ish anti-Semite, Einar Aaberg, who 



TINGA NURSERY & 
BULB FARM 

Camellias — Azaleas 
Broad Leaf Evergreens 

Phone 2-1975 Castle Hayne Rd. 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



almost single-handedly has succeed- 
ed in inundating such distant lands 
as the United States of America, 
South Africa and Latin America 
with his vicious anti-Jewish fabrica- 
tions and distortions. The British 
fascist Mosley is another case in 
point. 

The Allies were cognizant of the 




Greetings 





Shop at Sears 
and Save 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



TTTTTTTT ' 



TTTTTTTT ' 



TAXI? 

"The Leader" 

Coastal Cab 

Radio-Dispatched 

Dial 4464 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



MOHR'S 




MECHANiUAL REPAIRS 
Corner 12th and Market 
Dial 9261 Wilmington, N. C. 

TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT 

NATIONAL SIGN 
SERVICE 

Dependable 

106 N. Water Dial 2-1539 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 



SNEEDEN 

Air-Conditioning and 
Refrigeration Co. 

Dial 3-2828 Market Street Rd. 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



JOHNSON 
Trimming Shop 

Auto Body Repairing 
Convertible Tops Replaced 

306 Castle St. Dial 9536 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 



POINT PETER 
CONCRETE CO. 




Grade A 
Concrete Blocks 

Dial 2-0368 

1502 N. 7th 

At Seaboard Roundhouse 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



fact that the poison of Nazi propa- 
ganda might not evaporate simply 
through the collapse of the Third 
Reich. They initiated a series of 
measures for the denazification and 
democratization of Germany and 
Austria. Unfortunately, these were 
never fully implemented in Ger- 
many, due, in the main, to the dis- 
sensions which arose between West 
and East. The WJC has, however, 
never given up the fight against the 
persistence of the racial Nazi teach- 
ings and anti-Semitic acts and has 
constantly intervened with the Al- 
lies. It has also made surveys and 
studies of anti-Semitic sentiments 
and events and presented them to 
the Allied governments to bolster 
its interventions. 

What is presently the situation 
as regards the persistence of Nazi 
legaev and what is the WJC doing 
and going to do in this field? The 
fact that within the last few years 
an international anti-Semitic con- 
gress took place in Sweden, and a 
vear later, a second session in 
France, is complete proof of the 
existence of Fascist forces in various 
countries ready to cooperate on an 
international scale. The strong 
showing of neo-Nazi forces in West- 
ern Germany and the existence of a 
similar party in Austria and of a 
Fascist Partv in Italy with repre- 
sentatives in the respective Parlia- 
ments testify to the fact that the 
anti-Semitic teachings of Nazism arc 
still very much to be reckoned with. 

A Jewish body restricted to one 
or a few countries cannot see more 
than part of the total picture, and 
even this part is glimpsed partially 
because of the lack of knowledge of 
the forces behind the local move- 
ment and its ramifications abroad. 
Onlv a truly international body like 
the WJC can be in a position to 
see the whole picture, to expose the 
forces behind such international 
movements and to react promptly 
and efficiently to every action taken 
by such movements. The continu- 
ing success of the WJC in these 
tremendous effoits depends on the 
application of the knowledge and 
experience which it has acquired 
over the years and on the earnest 
and devoted support of its affiliated 
organizations. 



NEW YORK (WNS) — After 
more than four years of litigation 
instituted by the American Jewish 
Congress, the U. S. Court of Ap- 
peals for the District of Columbia 
restored U. S. citizenship to Morris 
Mendelesohn, a naturalized Ameri- 
can who has been stranded in Israel 
since 1936 through no fault of his 
own. 



E. W. GODWIN'S SONS 

For Better Lumber 

"Everything to Build the Home" 

SASH - DOORS - TRIM 
MOULDING - ROOFING MATERIALS 
INSULATING MATERIALS - MILLWORK 

Phone 7747 



Wilmington, N. C. 



M00RE-F0NVIELLE CORP. 

Chrysler Air Temp Air-Conditioners 
Sales and Service 



1809 Dawson 



Dial 4772 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 




People's Savings Bank & Trust Co. 

A COMPLETE BANKING SERVICE— ESTABLISHED 1900 
Let Us Serve Your Banking Requirements 

Insured up to $10,000 — Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corp. 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Front and Princess Streets Wilmington, N. C. 



PLUMBING and HEATING 

INDUSTRIAL, COMMERCIAL, RESIDENTIAL 
New Installations • Remodeling • Repairs 
Pipe and Boiler Insulation 

SALES AND SERVICE ON 
AMERICAN STANDARD • BRIGGS • CRANE 
PLUMBING AND HEATING FIXTURES 



A. W. BRANCH & SON 



Dial 2-3470 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



3909 Park Ave. 



IDEAL 

Laundry & Dry Cleaners, 

RUG CLEANERS 
A Service That Meets the Needs 
of All Homes 

Dial 6651 WILMINGTON, N. C. 206 S. Front St. 



70 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



SHOEMAKERS, Inc. 

Stationers — Office Supplies — Equipment 
206-208 Princess Street Phone 2-3332 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



MILLER BUILDING CORPORATION 

Franchisee! 

— BONDSTONE — 

Dealers 

Phone 3-4159 Insurance Building 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 



I SAVINGS 



Current Dividends 3% 



INVESTMENTS 



| Cooperative Savings & Loan Association j 



8 Front St. 



Frederick Willetts, Jr., Secretary 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



i 

Dial 5233 j 

i 



Reduce Your Insurance Costs 
Buy MUTUAL INSURANCE 

H. G. LATIMER & SON, Inc. 

Wallace BIdg. Dial 96C6 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 



E. S. PIVER & SON — Roofers 

Commercial Roofing and Sheet Metal Work 



i 

j 800 South 17th Street 



Dial 5919 



WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 





Fountain Oil Company 




Local Distributors for 


(rich field) 


Richfield Oil Products 


^^soliney/ 


Oil Burner Service 


Castle Hayne Road 


WILMINGTON, N. C. Dial 3-2443 



CITY ELECTRICAL SUPPLY CO. 

Electrical Contractors 

Specializing in Maintenance and Repairs 
29 North Third Street Phone 6091 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 



.iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiilillliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

TRUCK-TRACTOR SALES, Inc. 

Sales — WHITE TRUCKS — Service 

I I I I South 1 7th Phone 5869 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

uiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiih 



5713 — A YEAR OF 
CHALLENGE AND 
ACCOMPLISHMENT 

(Concluded From Page 24) 

jobs, opportunities — and shining 
hope. 

These are but the highlights of 
the roster of UJA achievement in 
5713. They reflect well and truly 
the stage of maturity reached dur- 
ing the United Jewish Appeal's fif- 
teen years. 

Behind this record of progress and 
achievement lies the great dream of 
the American Jewish community: 
peace and security for Jews every- 
where, and a strong and prosperous 
Israel to stand as a bulwark against 
tyranny and persecution and a mon- 
ument to human perseverance and 
ingenuity. 

The dream is strong and, although 
it has sustained American Jews for 
fifteen years, it is still in the build- 
ing. With others, American Jews 
look for the day when we will see an 
Israel without barren stretches of 
earth thirsting for water, without 
temporary immigration camps filled 
with families who have not yet 
found relief from homelessness, 
without unemployment and ration- 
ing and the continuous spectre of 
austerity. We envisage an Israel of 
farms, settlements, industry, new 
towns and busy streets — with roads, 
schools, hospitals enough for all the 
people's needs — with a feeling of 
freedom, warmth and happiness in 
the air. That is the Israel we look 
forward to, and that is the demo- 
cratic Israel wc are helping build. 
It is in this dream that the Ameri- 
can Jewish community has put its 
faith. 

The establishment of the UJA 
fifteen vears ago gave us a powerful 
instrument for the expression of that 
faith. Todav, because of this, the 
United Jewish Appeal is an integral 
part of Jewish community life, an 
expression of modern participation 
and an old and vcrv wise tradition 
of help. 



PORK SHOP BOMBED IN 
JERUSALEM 

JERUSALEM (WNS) — A pork- 
selling butcher shop near the Knes- 
set building was bombed this week 
for the third time but suffered no 
damage because an alert customer 
extinguished the incendiary bomb 
before it exploded. 

The owner of the butcher shop, 
Itzhak Levi, was a government wit- 
ness in the recent trial of religious 
extremists who were accused of set- 
ting fire to vehicles used on the Sab- 
bath. 



Gurr Jewelers 

Wilmington's Fine Jeweler 
and Silversmith 

264 N. Front 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



Dial 7292 

IDEAL 

Plumbing Co. 
All Work Guaranteed 

126 South Front Street 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



CAROLINA 
Ml LI WORK CO. 

Cabinet Makers 
Millwork — All Kinds 

731 S. 17th St. Dial 3-2463 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 

£11 1 1 1 1 1 II I II II II 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 II II IIS 

E Serving the E 

= Coastal Carolinas = 

= with E 

= Quality | 

= Dairy Products = 

I WHITE | 

E Ice Cream and Milk | 

E Company j 

riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiirc 



Famous for Diamonds 

If It's From 




WILMINGT0NS LEADING JEWELERS 



It's Guaranteed 

10 N. Front 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



CAPE FEAR 

MOTOR SALES, 
Ltd. 




Authorized Sales and Service 
215-217 Market Street 
Telephone 6657-6658 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



71 



A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A GREEN NURSE 

(Continued From Page 67) 



er gain nor lose by it financially. But 
I can do a lot of good." Moshe said 
it didn't matter to him whether she 
washed baby clothes or donned her 
uniform again, so long as she was 
happy. 

So one day last spring, she report- 
ed to Hadassah. "Can you use me?" 
she asked Rehuma Druckman, Hos- 
pital and District Medical Service 
chief. Could Hadassah use this 
bright girl with a reputation for 
thoroughness and hard work! Ruth 
underwent a month's specialization 
training. She worked in various 
clinics in the city, also in a canvas- 
hutted maabara for a while, where 
conditions were pretty grim and peo- 
ple had to learn from scratch about 
sanitation and hygiene. Then she 
was transferred to Beth Israel, the 
cherim and peddlers. 

For the past twelve years, Hadas- 
sah district nurses, like Ruth, have 
been bringing the hospital to the 
patient's home. It solves a number 
of problems: it lessens pressure on 
hospital beds and in many instances 
makes the patient's illness easier to 
bear. Long-term patients are given 
physiotherapy and diversional thera- 
py (a kind of occupational therapy). 
Special attentions, like delicacies 
and little pleasures, are reserved for 
patients suffering from incurable dis- 
eases. If the need is great, the nurse 
provides clothes for the children. 

FREEMAN 
SHOE COMPANY 

"Shoes That Satisfy" 
* 

24 North Front Street 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WILLIAMS 
CLEANERS 



Try Our Shirt 
Laundry Service 
808 S. 17th St. Dial 2-1357 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



More often than not, Ruth has 
to help with advice on non-medical 
problems, for she is trusted. "What 
shall I do?" asks Mr. S., a bearded 
middle-aged man, who main occupa- 
tion is studying the Talmud. He is 
in complete despair. "My wife, un- 
der the influence of her wicked sis- 
ter, deserted me. What shall I do 
with the four children?" He used 
to sell soap, candles and matches 
at street corners, when he wasn't in 
( Please Turn To Page 7 5 ) 




Dr. Herman M. Pomrenze, former Chi- 
cago physician who is now Medical Di- 
rector of the Israel Federation of La- 
bor's Arza Sanatorium near Jerusalem. 
Dr. PomreiTze is in this country as 
secretary pro tem of the Medical Asso- 
ciates for Kupat Holim which is hold- 
ing its first annual convention at the 
Commodore Hotel in New York on 
December 26-27. 



ALLEN LUMBER 
COMPANY 

Kiln-Dried N. C. Pine 
and Cypress 
Telephone 2-2231 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 

Dial 9649 

WILL REHDER 

FLOWERS 
For All Occasions 

155 North Front Street 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



ATLANTIC UPHOLSTERING CO. 

Upholstering and Furniture Repairing 

620 Orange St. WILMINGTON, N. C. Dial 5107 



HANOVER IRON WORKS 

HORACE T. KING 
Sheet Metal, Roofing and Heating Contractors 
Lennox Oil Heating and Carrier Air Conditioning 
I 12 N. Water Street Dial 2-3257 

WILMINGTON. NORTH CAROLINA 



! J. W. MURGHISON CO. 

| Wholesale Hardware 

j 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 Chestnut St. Dial 6604, 6605 

\ 
I 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



i 



.(lllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllMlllllliilllllllllllllllllll!lllllliail!lll!IIMIIIIIIIII!llll!llllii) 

CROSS SEED COMPANY 

Wholesale -Retail SEEDS -TUXEDO FEEDS 

10-12 Market Street Telephone 2-1005 j 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitgiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitgiiEiiiiini' 



JAMES A. SIMON CO. 

General Contractors 

RESIDENTIAL — COMMERCIAL — INDUSTRIAL 

Dial 9759 P. O. Box 1505 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 



DODGE — PLYMOUTH PASSENGER CARS 
and DODGE JOB-RATED TRUCKS 

SALES AND SERVICE 

BAUGH MOTOR COMPANY 

216 N. Second Street Dial 7554 WILMINGTON, N. C. 



y.iMiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiif!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiigniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii9iiiir£ 

| GAUSE MIRROR AND GLASS CO. | 

= Plate Glass ♦ Window Glass ♦ Mirror Glass = 
= Picture Framing Pick Up and Delivery I 

I 250 Castle Dial 3-1394 = 

= WILMINGTON, N. C. E 

TilllllllllllllllIIIllllllllllllllllllllliIilllinillllllllllll!IIIIIIIIIIIMIHIinSllllllllilIIIHilllll(~ 



FARRAR TRANSFER & STORAGE WAREHOUSE 

Authorized Agents for Allied Van Lines, Inc. 

Household Goods Moved, Packed, Shipped and Stored 

1121 S. Front Dial 5317 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 



CITY-DIXIE LAONDRY and DRY GLEANERS 

"A Service for Every Home" 

Prompt Call for and Delivery Service 

412 S. 17th St. Dial 6696 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 



Waccamaw Oil Transport Company 

Dependable Petroleum Transportation 

106 South Front Street Phones 2-2285 — 2-1456 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 



72 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



The Following Firms in . . . 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 



1 
1 




i 
i 

V 

i 



Fayetteville' s Finest Department Store 



ROGERS & BREECE 

Established 1902 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 24-Hour Ambulance Service 



i 

) 123 Bow Street FAYETTE VILLE, N. C. Dial 2-2191 j 

i 



DAVID G. ALLEN, Contractor 

TILES — MARBLE — TERRAZZO 
Authorized SUNTILE Dealer 

N. C. State Permit 16 
403 Rowan Street Dial 2-6367 

Albert J. Wagar, Manager FAYETTE VILLE, N. C. 



Home Federal Savings & Loan Assn. 




of Fayetteville 

Savings and Home Financing 

241 Green Street Dial 2-5161 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



MACHINE AND WELDING CO. 

ELECTRIC ARC and ACETYLENE WELDING 
General Repairs on Anything 
Boiler Patching, Pipe Fitting, Welding of All Kinds 

Dial 2242 — 110 E. Edgerton St. — Dunn, N. C. 
Dial 2-4593 — I 17 N. Race Path — Fayetteville, N. 



C. 



Parher Neon Co 



SALES 




SERVICE 



Bulletins, Trucks, Gold Leaf — A Complete Sign Service 
Phone 2-8316 FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 143 Maxwell St. 



A A A A 



STORIES OF KING DAVID 

By LILIAN S. FREEHOF — A Review 

STORIES OF KING DAVID. By Lillian S. Freehof. Philadelphia, Pa., The 
Jewish Publication Society of America, 1952. 161 pages and 62 illustrations. 
$3.U0. 



When the author of Ecclesiastes 
said that "of making of many books 
there is no end," he was not speak- 
ing of Jewish juveniles. Of such we 
have not nearlv enough, especially 
of the kind rooted in the Jewish lit- 
erary and spiritual tradition. For, 
whatever one expects from the books 
meant for all children, those in- 
tend for a Jewish child must be 
tested bv their effectiveness in in- 
troducing their readers to Jewish re- 
ligious and cultural values. This 
limits the field considerably and 
faces the author with a challenge 
which frequently proves discourag- 
ing. This may account for the small 
number of workers in this field as 
well as of the superior quality of 
those who accept the challenge. 

Mrs. Lillian S. Freehof has met 
the problem inherent in Jewish ju- 
venile literature and has solved it 
successfully, wth skill and imagina- 
tion. For material she turned to 



FAIRES TRAILER 
COMPANY 

Trailer Headquarters 
for the Carolinas 

Offices in 

CHARLOTTE-GREENSBORO 
RALEIGH-FAYETTE VILLE 
JACKSONVILLE, N. C. 



that inexhaustible supply of Jewish 
imaginative literature which goes by 
the name of Midrash. Those mid- 
rashic elements which cluster about 
biblical personalities have been col- 
lected in that peerless scholarly 
work, The Legends of the Jews, by 
Professor Louis Ginzberg, published 
by The Jewish Publication Society 
a good many vears ago. Mrs. Free- 
hof took the suggestions given there 
and expanded them into charming 
and amusing short stories, each cen- 
tering about an incident in the 
eventful life of David, King of 
Judah and Israel. 

There are about twenty stories, 
beginning with the explanation of 
the reason why David lived exactly 
seventy years and concluding with 
one of the manv tales which hint 
at David's immortal influence. Be- 
tween fhese are set the adventures 



BUTLET? 
Nurseries * 

Personal Attention to the 
Design and Execution of Any 
Type of Landscape Work 

4 Miles on Elizabethtown Road 
Dial 3-1524 R.F.D. 7 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



j i 
i ! 
i i 

j ! 



JOHNSON COTTON COMPANY 

OF FAYETTEVILLE, Inc. 
Everything for the Farm and Home 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



i 
i 

i — ■ - ' 

in 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 if 1 1 1 1 ii i in 1 1 in ii ii i in i in 1 1 1 1 1 it ii 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 in 1 1 1 ii fri mi i ii i if 

CHRYSLER AIR-CONDITIONING 
HEATING and COOLING 

JOHNSON SERVICE CO. 

Dial 2-6650 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 

Pi ■ 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ i ■ i i ■ i ■ ■ ■ i n i i n 1 1 1 1 1 1 i n i i i i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 ■ i ■ ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 i T 



I 



Cape Fear Supply Co. 

Building Materials— Mill Supplies 

319 W. Russell ~ D,al{ \™ y Fa ^" eville ' N ' C « j 



WHEATLEY MOTORS, Inc. 

LINCOLN 

MERCURY 



Sales and 
Service 




Body Repairing — Wheel 
Aligning — Complete Paint 
Work — Upholstering 



419 W. Russell — Dial 3-3114 



\ 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. [ 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



73 



Buy Mutual and Save the Difference 
FROM 

NORMAN 

INSURANCE SERVICE 

Sandrock Building Dial 2-7157 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 

M. and 0. 
CHEVROLET CO. 

SALES SERVICE 

427 Franklin St. Phone 3-1655 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



Park Place Garage 

COMPLETE AUTO REPAIR 

24-Hour Wrecker Service 

Morganton Road 
and Broadfoot Ave. 

Dial 3-0573 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



BLACKWELL & RAY 

Fayetteville's Qualified 
ELECTRICAL 
CONTRACTORS 

Dial 2-8188 118 Old St. 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



BOULEVARD 
FLOWER MART 

Bonny Doone 
Next to Harold's Bar-B-Que 
Ft. Bragg Blvd. - Dial 7-0520 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



TP" 



Burkhead-DeVane 
Printing Co. 



i 



1 Printers — Office Supplies j 

| 218 Franklin St. Phone 2-3007 ! 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. I 



i DUIANF 

! • Cooking 

• Water Heating 
f • Refrigeration 
I • Space Heating 

j Fayetteville Bottle 
| Gas Company 



Dial 2-3848 

Nights, Sundays and Holidays 
Dial 2-7280 

233 Franklin St. 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



of the shepherd, the chosen king, 
the fugitive from Saul, the con- 
queror, the poet-musician, and oth- 
ers. Children of seven to eleven are 
sure to be enthralled bv them. 

The inllustrations of the book de- 
serve separate consideration. Mrs. 
Seymour Kaplan has given these 
stories a pictorial attractiveness rare 
in Jewish juvenila. He not only 
caught the spirit of the legendary 
past, but has succeeded in repre- 
senting it with modern dynamism 
as well as a touch of humor. Printed 
in color, the book is sure to capture 
and hold a child's attention. 

Do It Now! Buy That 
Israel Bond! 




Bronze lamp with Handle in shape of 
Seven-Branched Candlestick of about 
the 4th Century A.D. The handle of 
the lamp was made in the shape of the 
candlestick (menorah), with one side 
supported by lulav and ethrog (the 
symbol of a Jewish holiday — Succoth — 
Feast of the Tabernacles) and the 
other side supported by a shofar (a 
ram's horn whose use on Jewish holy 
days has continued to the present). 
Bronze lamps of this kind are extremely 
rare. There are many pottery lamps of 
the Byzantine and Roman period deco- 
rated with Jewish symbols, though the 
symbols in the shape of the handle 
probably followed the often-used Chris- 
tian fashion of the period when the 
handle of the choicest lamps were fash- 
ioned in the forms of religious symbols. 
This lamp is part of the collection of 
Mrs. Miriam Shaar Schloessinger. 



EDWARDS 
MILLWORK CO. 

One of the Largest and 
Most Modern Equipped in 
Fayetteville 

Wholesale - Retail 
DIAL 2-4094 

417 Glidden St. 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



TUNE TO 

WFNC 

F or Latest News 
and Entertainment 

CAPE FEAR 

DR0ADGASTING GO. 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



First Citizens 
Bank & Trust Co. 

Complete 
BANKING SERVICE 

Established 1898 

1 00 Hay Street 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



TTTTTTTTTT 



BRYAN PONTIAC-CADILLAC CO. 

Sales and Service 

GOODWILL USED CARS — DIAL 7554 
410 W. Russell FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. Dial 2-6364 



M & M Truck & Tractor Company 

• INTERNATIONAL TRUCKS 

© FARM MACHINERY 

• HOME APPLIANCES 

Lumberton Road FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



HAYMOUNT 
Esso Service 

24 HOUR SERVICE 



DIAL 3-0115 



824 Hay St. 



Fayetteville, N. C. 



DIAL 2-7988 

Boulevard Florist 

At Crossover of 

Old Ft. Bragg Highway 
and New Boulevard 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



THOMAS & HOWARD 
COMPANY 

Whole Groceries 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



HIGHLAND 
LUMBER CO. 

Builders Supplies 

Dial 2-3191 325 Blount St. 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



■, ''.■:::;t;v.t; ■ .t. .v.t,"..v.. .•ri\\if,iVrstx.-;\S;::.vrLV!. =- 



TAXI? 

2-5131 

Safety Taxi Company 

Competent and Courteous 
Drivers 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. J 



Moving and Storage 

Local and Long Distance 
MOVING 

• Packing • Shipping 

• Crating • Storing 

Agent for 

NORTH AMERICAN 

VAN LINES, Inc 



Ft. Bragg Rd. — Dial 3-2104 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



74 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



The Following Firms in . . . 

GASTONIA. N. C. 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 



SUNRISE DAIRY 

Qualify Dairy Products — Ice Cream 

CITY-WIDE DELIVERY 
Dial 6354 GASTONIA, N. C. 509 W. Franklin 




i First Federal Saving & Loan Assoc. 



^ttT&i&' Insured Savings 

251 W. Main Avenue Telephone 7248 

GASTONIA, N. C. 



CAROTHERS FUNERAL HOME 

A Complete Dignified Service 
AMBULANCE — DIAL 6337 

125 West Franklin Avenue 
GASTONIA, NORTH CAROLINA 



NORMS SUPPLY & MACHINE COMPANY 

Automatic Heating Plants and Mill Supplies — Appliances 

232 East Airline Avenue Phone 7931 

GASTONIA, N. C. 



IHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllii 

A. F. GRIGG SHEET METAL WORKS 

Over 31 Years Experience in 
CUSTOM SHEET METAL WORK 

310 North Oakland Telephone 7141 

GASTONIA, N. C. 

yiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Gastonia Plumbing & Heating Co., Inc. 



1301 W. Franklin Ave. 



Contractors 



GASTONIA, N. C. 



Dial 7215 



WITTEN IRON & METAL COMPANY 



310 East Long Avenue 



DR. BENJAMIN GRUSKIN - - 

He Played An Important Part 
In The Discovery of Chlorophyl 



In all the thousands of words 
that have been written recently in 
promoting Chlorophyl, in many 
manufactured products in daily use, 
little attention has been paid to the 
fact that Dr. Benjamin Gruskin, 
who died two years ago, was a pio- 
neer in the discovery of Chlorophyl 
as a therapeutic agent. 

Dr. Gruskin was born in Finland 
and came to this country at the age 
of four. He became a leading pa- 
thologist in Chicago and was a pro 
fessor at Loyola Medical School. 
His prime interest was research, par- 
ticularly with reference to cancer, 
and he affiliated himself with the 
Memorial Hospital for the Treat- 
ment of Cancer and Allied Diseases, 
at Cornell University. He subse- 
quently became Director of Cancer 
Research at Temple University in 
Philadelphia. 

It was in the course of his work 
in research that Dr. Gruskin 1930 
began using Chlorophyl in the treat- 
ment of wounds. His research work 
at the time was being financed by 
the Lakeland Foundation, a non- 
profit making organization. Follow- 
ing his experiments with Chloro- 
phyl, the foundation urged him to 
take out a patent, which he subse- 
quently did, in 1938. Although the 
patent was in his name, he assigned 
it to the Foundation. For this he 
was granted a life monthly payment 
of $500. 

Subsequently, the Foundation 
sold a license to the Rystant Co.. 
organized by two advertising execu- 
tives, and in 1945, commercial use 
of Chlorophvl began with the man- 
ufacture of an ointment, Chlore- 
sium. Three years later a toothpaste 
with chlorophvl was produced, and 
in 1950 the Rystan Company 
bought the patent from the Lake- 
land Foundation. The rest is mer- 
chandising history. 

Dr. Gruskin was acclaimed for 
another discovery. His so-called 
"five minute" test for pregnancy is 



considered among the most accu- 
rate tests for this condition. 

Dr. Gruskin was a graduate of the 
University of Pittsburgh, and the 
Rush Medical College, Chicago. At 
the time of his death, he was under- 
going the rice treatment at Duke 
University in Durham, N. C. He 
is survived by his wife and two sons. 
His son, George, is an executive 
with the William Morris Theatrical 
Agency. 

In commenting on the fact that 
the Chlorophyl industry reached 
sales running into the hundreds of 
millions of dollars in 1952, and is 
apparently only beginning, Mrs. 
Gruskin, who is employed in Phila- 
delphia said, "My husband was born 
twenty years ahead of his time and 
died twenty years too soon. He 
would be amazed, and, I'm afraid, 
a little shocked, if he could see what 
has happened to his discovery." 



EVANS 

College of Commerce 

CLAUDE A. WHITE, President 



Day and Night Classes 

Stenographic, Secretarial 

Junior Accounting 
Senior Accounting, and 
Business Administration Courses 

Comptometer - Multigraph 
Multilith 
Book-Keeping Machines 



Eree Employment Service 
For Employers and Employees 



Licensed by the State Board 
Member of National Council 
of Private Business Schools, 
and North Carolina Associa- 
tion of Business Schools 



Phone 5-3501 Realty Bldg. 
GASTONIA, N. C. 



GASTONIA, N. C. 



I = 

j = 

j = 

i i 

Phone 5-5961 j S 

i I 

I i 

i = 




Call On Us for Quick Service 
on: 

RING HOLDERS 
BOBBIN SHAFT GEARS 
BOBBIN GEARS 
SPINDLE SHAFT GEARS 
|# | IITT7 MACHINE & 

ALU 114 FOUNDRY CO. 

GASTONIA, N. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



7h 



A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A GREEN NURSE 

(Concluded From Page 71 ) 



the beth hamedrash. Then he de- 
veloped stomach ulcers and had to 
stay in bed. Ruth helps get the 
children cared for, and promises him 
a fortnight's "good living" at Ha- 
dassah's convalescent home in the 
city. After that he will have to find 
light work. 

And so on, from case to case. In 
each place Ruth unpacks her leather 
bag and places sterilized syringes, 
bottles and bandages on a neat plas- 
tic cloth she brings along, unfolds 
a white apron and sets to work with 
quick, quiet movements. 

One of Hadassah's eleven Green 
Nurses is stationed at the Roths- 
child-Hadassah-University Hospital. 
She maintains contact with the pa- 
tients' families, and, if the patient 
is a breadwinner, sees to it that wife 
and children have enough to eat. 

Once the patient is ready for dis- 
charge, the nurse of the district is 
alterted to maintain post-hospital 
care, and the hospital physician 
turns over his records to the district 
physician. Thus the recuperating pa- 
tient is in safe hands. Neither ig- 
norance nor passivity will prevent 
his full recovery, because both the 
doctor and the Green Nurse serving 
his district will watch over him. 

Ruth keep watch over own family 
too. Jacki, the blonde two-year old, 
is well looked after by the young 
Egyptian maid. By the time Moshe 
comes home around 5 o'clock, Ruth 
has already done the shopping and 
carried her purcheses up the seven 
flights of stairs. There is rarely 
enough electricity for the elevator. 

And there is even a small surplus 



each month, for trained nurses had 
their wages upped recently. That 
makes Ruth extra proud, Every now 
and then, with a grandiose gesture, 
she offers to take Moshe out in the 
evening to a movie or dinner. "And 
pay for a baby sitter?" asks Moshe. 
"Oh no, the dear old ladies next 
door (one is 75 and the other 80) 
are happy each time we step out so 
they can watch over their pet Jacki." 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 




d 

mm 



MRS. JACK LEVIN 

The marriage of Mildred Block, 
daughter of Mrs. Rose Block and 
the late Aaron Block, of Nashville, 
Tenn., to Jack Levin, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Sol Levin, of Burlington, 
took place on August 30th in the 
West End Synagogue, Nashville. 
Due to the serious illness of an 
uncle of the bride, the wedding 
plans were changed and only the 
immediate family attended. 



BURLINGTON, N. C. 



GRAHAM, N. C. 



MIDWAY OIL CORPORATION 

CITIES SERVICE PnJlKH 



Distributors 



P. O. Box 552 — Telephone 6-6666 and 3062 
GRAHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 





THE BREAD 


YOU NEED 




FOR ENERGY 




BURLINGTON 


Bamby Bakers 


SALISBURY 



The Following Firms in . . . 

BURLINGTON - GRAHAM, N. C. 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 



TERMITES 

fobs Done in Accordance with U. S. Dept. of Agriculture. Known to be 
permanent. Proof happily furnished that we consistently make good where 
others fail. 

Hundreds of Satisfied Customers for References 
Industrial and Commercial Fogging for All Types of Insects 

ROOFING — SIDING . . . All Types 

Special Type Known to Last 25 Years — EASY TERMS 

ROY WEST & CO. 

CARL F. MILLER, State Manager 
STATE OFFICE: 1511 South Park Avenue— BURLINGTON, N. C. 

Phones: 6-0771 — Night 6-1015 

Three Generations of Same Business 



Season's Greetings and Best Wishes to All of Our Many 
Jewish Patrons and Friends for a Happy 
and Prosperous New Year 

CITY RADIO SALES & SERVICE 

Opposite State Theatre -:- Telephone 6-9237 

BURLINGTON, N. C. 




West Elm St. -:- Telephone 6-3308 
GRAHAM, N. C. 



TTTTTTTT 



T T T T T 



Greetings From MORTON'S 

"The Home of Beautiful Curtains" 

122 Maple Ave. BURLINGTON, N. C. 



BURLINGTON AWNING COMPANY 

Four-Way Aluminum Awnings • Canvas Awnings 
Storm Windows and Doors 
1905 Webb Ave. BURLINGTON, N. C. Tel. 6-7749 



Elon Rd 



WHITE ENGINEERING CO. 

Plumbing and Heating 

"Specializing in Larger Work" 

P. O. Box 371 Phone 6-6930 

BURLINGTON, N. C. 



Part of All You Earn Is Yours to Save 



C 



0MMINITY FEDERAL 



Saving* cmd Jotz<n CZMOcia&on 



445 S. Spring St. Opposite Post Office Phone 3631 

BURLINGTON, N. C. 




76 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



The Somers-Pardue 
Agency, Inc. 

Serving in 
REAL ESTATE 
GENERAL INSURANCE 

MORTGAGE LOANS 
BONDS and RENTALS 

431 S. Spring St. 

"The Post Office Is Across the 
Street From Us" 

BURLINGTON, N. C. 

Members 
C. G. Somers Earl Pardue 

Glenn Miller Bob Arthur 



Elkins-Terrell 
Inc. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiEiMimiiiiiiiiiimiiiiii' 

MACK TRUCKS 

Sales — Service 

Complete Truck Service 
on Any Make or Model 

Automotive Service, 
Inc. 

Authorized Dealer for 
Alamance, Caswell, Orange, 
Person and Randolph 
Counties 

116 S. Beaumont Ave. 

DIAL 6-5258 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 



Sales 

DE SOTO 
PLYMOUTH 

Service 

319 North Main Street 

Dial 6-5538 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 



SELF 

ELECTRIC 
COMPANY 

9 Residential 
& Commercial 
£ Industrial 
WIRING 

DIAL 6-1992 
GRAHAM, N. C. 



BURLINGTON ROOFING CO. 

Barrett Roofing — All Kinds of Sheet Metal Work 
Forced Warm Air Heating 

A. APPLE, Owner 



I 

j 159 E. Ruffin 



M. 



BURLINGTON, N. C. 



Dial 6-5756 



TIRE SALES CO. 

• Kelly Springfield Tires 
• Appliances 
104 W. Main Dial 6-6331 

BURLINGTON, N. C. 



Jennings M. Bryan 

Insurance That Protects 
Dial 7458 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 




Burlington Coca-Cola 
Bottling Company 



WELBORN 

Cleaner Products 
Co., Inc. 



SOAP PRODUCTS 
Wholesale — Retail 
WELBORN'S CLEANER 
WELBORN'S LIQUID HAND SOAPS 
WELBORN'S PINE OIL SCRUB SOAP 
and other soap products 



Five Points — P. O. Box 422 
HIGH POINT, N. C. 



THE SYNAGOGUE 

( Concluded From Page 1 9 ) 

not permit the totality of Jewish liv- 
ing to become limited to worship 
alone. 

Synagogue worship, piety and 
reverence arc precious elements in 
the makeup of a religious Jew, but 
they must not quench the eternal 
Jewish thirst for divine learning 
which is the source of Jewish piety. 
Divine knowledge is unlike secular 
knowledge. It possesses a power — 
a spiritual mystic power — all of its 
own. The studying of Torah, it- 
self communicates religiousity and 
morality. 

Our Sages tell us that since the 
destruction of the Temple, the 
Holy One Blessed be He has no 
other dwelling place among men 
than in the four ells of the 
Halakhah, which is equivalent to 
saying that Judaism means, above 
everything else, life according to the 
divine law of the Torah. There can 
be no Jewish observance or piety 
without Jewish learning. If we 
want an observant, religious genera- 
tion it must be instructed with 
God's word given to us in the 
Torah. The immortal words of 
Rabbainu Saadia Gaon arc still 
valid today, "Our nation is a nation 
only by virtue of the Torah". We 
require a traditional synagogue that 
will make the social, religious, and 
educational aspects of Judaism one 
inter-dependent unit. 

In ancient times when every Jew 
was a "living Torah", and every 
Jewish home a little sanctuary, the 
Synagogue was nevertheless the 
central institution in Jewish life. 
Today, the future of Judaism de- 
pends upon our obility to create a 
spiritual and intellectual environ- 
ment based on the concept of the 
indivisibility of Torah learning and 
worship, of the dependence of our 
communal and social endeavors 
upon the spiritual teachings of our 
traditions. In ancient times, the 
pious life of every individual Jew 
had its profound influence on the 
life of the spiritual community. 
Today, the Synagogue through edu- 
cating in Torah must bring about 
the establishment of a spiritual 
community which can exercise its 
influence upon the life of even- 
Jew. 

ATTENTION! 
WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS 

Obtaining subscriptions or renew- 
als for the American Jewish Times- 
Outlook is an ideal way of raising 
money for your projects or general 
fund. Write for full particulars. 



Dial 6-1669 

TROLLINGER'S 

FLORIST 

* 



BURLINGTON, N. C. 

MODERN 

VENETIAN BLIND CO. 

Manufacturers of 
Quality Venetian Blinds 
1905 Webb Ave. Telephone 6-5443 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 

G. Marvin Holt, Inc. 

FRIGIDAIRE 

Sales — Service 

Dial 3661 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 



National Bank 



of 



Burlington 




BURLINGTON, N. C. 



HOOD SYSTEM 
INDUSTRIAL BANK 

SAVINGS — LOANS 

BURLINGTON, N. C. 



PEELE ELECTRICAL CO. 

G. E. APPLIANCES 

1229 Webb Ave. Dial 6-4441 

BURLINGTON, N. C. 



RICH & THOMPSON 
FUNERAL SERVICE 

AMBULANCE 
Dial 6-1622 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



77 



THE SAGA OF THE SOIL 

By DR. ABRAHAM GRANOTT 



The beginning of the vear 5714 
affords an opportunity to review the 
work of the Jewish National Fund 
and list some of its achievements. 
Characterized by the 23rd World 
Zionist Congress held in Jerusalem 
in 1952 as one of the major funds 
of the Zionist Movement, serviing 
as one of the chief instruments for 
the realization of Zionism, the Jew- 
ish National Fund has an interest- 
ing and impressive story to tell of 
land reclamation and land develop- 
ment, which is part of the great 
saga of the State of Israel. 
80% of Total Jewish Land Holdings 

in Israel Is in the Hands of the 
Jewish National Fund 

A few figures will tell the story: 
The Jewish National Fund now 
owns about 3,500,000 dunams. Of 
these, 2,500,000 dunams have been 
redeemed since the establishment of 
the State, which means that we 
have been able to acquire within 
the last five years more than twice 
as much as were in a position to re- 
deem in almost half a centurv. 
Eighty per cent of the total of Jew- 
ish agricultural land is in the hands 
of the JNF; four-fifths of the total 
agricultural production of Israel de- 
rives from Jewish National Fund 
land. Noteworthy in this connec- 
tion is the growth of the soil 



brought about through the reclama- 
tion projects of the Jewish National 
Fund: The JNF has added to the 
Jewish patrimony 300,000 dunams 
in the swamp regions and about 
200,000 dunams in the hill areas of 
'the Galilee, the Shomron and 
Judea as well as in the wastes of the 
Negev. 

All 350 new settlements launched 
since the foundation of the State 
in 1948 were established on land 
provided by the Jewish National 
Fund. 

Since the establishment of the 
State of Israel, the JNF has planted 
approximately 18,000,000 trees, al- 
most three times the number 
planted in the course of half a cen- 
tury. 

Water for Parched Land 

The Jewish National Fund is 
deeply interested in irrigation, since 
water is second only to the land 
itself as a prerequisite to Israel's de- 
velopment. Out of the 3,500,000 
dunams that are being cultivated by 
Jewish farmers in Israel today, less 
than 500,000 are under irrigation. 
The Jewish National Fund is a 
major partner in Israel's foremost 
public water supply company, Mek- 
orot, which has established the 
country's principal water supply 
system and is responsible for the 




The Terra Sancta College, temporary main building of the Hebrew University in 
Jerusalem. When the road to Mt. Scopus was cut, the University leased a major 
part of this monastery building for Univesrity use, Franciscan monks continue to 
occupy a section of the building. 



I 



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TEXTILE DISTRIBUTORS 

INCORPORATED 
MILL AGENTS 

Ladies' - Men's - Children's HOSIERY 

THOMASVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 



McCLURE 

FUNERAL 
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141 S. Main 
GRAHAM, N. C. 
Dial 2711 

605 Webb Ave. 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 
Dial 7488 



LILIEN & LEE, 
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BURLINGTON, N. C. 



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BURLINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



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Motors*, Inc. 

CHEVROLET 



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BURLINGTON, N. C. 



TOWER HOSIERY MILLS 

INCORPORATED 

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Cement Brick 9 Slag Blocks 
Concrete Pipe • Septic Tanks \\ 
4 In. Tile 11 



KING BRICK & 
PIPE COMPANY 

ROY W. KING, Manager 

Phone 7446 1 637 S. Park Ave. 
BURLINGTON, N. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



The Following Firms in . . . 

WINSTON - SALEM, N. C. 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 



New Department — Pest Control 

BROOKBANK & STONE 

ROCKWOOL INSULATION & ROOFING CO. 

"COMFORTIZE YOUR HOME — YOU WILL NEVER REGRET IT" 
3045 Indiana Avenue Dial 3-1 151 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



Complete Dry Cleaning Service 
Fur Cleaning and Storage 

£mit(l DRY CLEANERS 

310 North Claremont Avenue Phone 3'2491 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



SALEM ELECTRIC COMPANY 

Contractors 

FRANK R. MYERS and E. L. THOMAS 
Anything Electrical — Anytime — 24-Hour Service 

315 South Liberty Dial 6174 

WINSTON-SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA 



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| CAROLINA MARBLE AND TILE COMPANY ( 

§ SINCE 1921 | 

| 1001 North West Boulevard Dial 4-3641 | 

| WINSTON-SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA | 

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Dodge Plymouth 

Dodge Job-Rated Trucks — Sales and Service 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



ROMINGER FURNITURE CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1900 

Home Furnishings ♦ Phil co - RCA - Zenith Radios 

423 North Liberty Street 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



Anderson Patrol, 
Inc. 

Complete Detective Service 
Let us protect your business 

or home against burglary. 
Dial 5-4431 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



COX'S SEED STORE 

Seeds, Bulbs, Poultry Feeds 
Fertilizers and Dog Food 

600 North Trade Dial 7242 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



development of new resources. An 
indication of what is done to in- 
crease Israel's water supply is to be 
found in these figures. By the end 
of 1951, the annual supply was 85,- 
000,000 cubic meters; in 1952, the 
water supply rose to 120,000,000 
cubi cmeters. The pipeline to the 
Negev and the laying of a second 
water main to Jerusalem are some 
of the recent achievements of our 
water supply arm. 

The Jewish National Fund has 
contributed greatly to the solution 
of the housing problem in Israel, 
70,000 men, women and children 
are housed in rural housing devel- 
opments, while 100,000 live in urban 
housing developments located on 
JNF land. 

More Deserts to Reclaim 

One might ask: — "What are the 
tasks of the Jewish National Fund, 
now that we have a Jewish State?" 
Again, we let the figures tell their 
own story. 

Out of the 20,500,0000 dunams 
within the buondaries of the State 
only 5,000,000 are under cultivation; 
the rest is desert, rock, swamp and 
sand dune. 

It is the task of the Jewish Na- 
tional Fund, afte racquiring the soil 
of Israel as the possession of the 
Jewish people, to develop the land 
and prepare it for cultivation and 
the settlement of the new immi- 
grants who come streaming to the 
shores of the Jewish homeland and 
those who, we hope, will come from 
countries which hitherto were closed 
to Jewish emigration. The estab- 
lishment of the State of Israel af- 
fords the Jewish National Fund a 
historic opportunity to make rapid 
headway in the attainment of its 
goal. That goal is to make room in 



Israel for every Jew who needs or 
wishes to settle there. To support 
the new immigrants, large areas of 
land must immediately be brought 
under cultivation. To keep the 
country's economy balanced about 
20% of its people must be settled 
on land. Obviously, the land should 
not become a source of private 
profit or an object of speculation. 
The task of bringing the land into 
the eternal possession of the Jewish 
people and making it fit for settle- 
ment remains the duty of the Jew- 
ish National Fund. In the first half 
century of its existence, the JNF 
established the foundations of the 
Jewish homeland; it is the task of 
the Jewish National Fund, within 
the next decade or so, to fill the 
vacant spaces of Israel's territory and 
to transform waste and desert lands 
into a garden of God. 



NEW YORKER HEADS 
JEWISH CONGRESS 

GENEVA, Switzerland— Dr. Na- 
hum Goldmann of New York has 
been elected president of the World 
Jewish Congress. The Polish-born 
American has served as acting presi- 
dent of the organization since 1949. 

Dr. Goldmann was chosen for a 
four-year term at the closing session 
of the congress meeting here. His 
election came after delegates ap- 
proved a resolution expressing con- 
cern at the "steady growth of neo- 
Nazi elements" in Germany. 

The congress asked the German 
government to take action against 
these groups. A French move to 
condemn German rearmament as a 
danger to the world and to the Jew- 
ish people was defeated after a hot 
debate. 



Your Convention Hotel 



350 ROOMS 



350 BATHS 



Centrally 
Located 



i 




The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



79 




The New Year will see introduced into Israel's manufacturing plants and 
workshops the skills of hundreds of newly trained mechanics and craftsmen, 
such as these young men practicing metal forging at the OR T Vocational Cen- 
ter in Jaffa. ORT schools in 17 cities and towns are helping to train Israel's 
young manhood in the skills and techniques required for the efficient operation 
of the country's industries. ORT in Israel is supported by the American Jew- 
ish community, in part, with funds made available by the Joint Distribution 
Committee, a member agency of the United Jewish Appeal. 

A YEAR OF THE McCARRAN-WALTER ACT 



(Continued 

crime involving "moral turpitude," 
that is, a crime which our own ju- 
dicial system would regard as re- 
prehensible or blameworthy. By 
dropping the "moral turpitude" 
qualification and by permitting ex- 
clusion upon conviction of any so- 
called non-political crime, no mat- 
ter how trivial, the new law for the 



Mat 



DKl'AKl'MKM' h'l'UKE 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



O'HANLON'S 

DRUG STORE 

Sick Room Supplies 
Latest Magazines — Cosmetics 
Candy — Luncheonette 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



From Page 40) 

first time vests foreign courts with 
the power to screen our immigrants. 
It commits us to ratify the verdicts 
of totalitarian tribunals that operate 
on premises hostile to our demo- 
cratic concepts. To take but one of 
many instances, the Belgian war- 
bride of an American airman has 
been denied entry under the new 
law because, while at slave labor 
for the Nazis, she was convicted by 
Nazi courts of falsifying documents 
to obtain food ration tickets. We 
are saddled with an immigration 
act that excludes victims of Nazi 
courts while a red carpet is spread 
before the Nazis. 

Meanwhile, the original pro- 

Firestone Stores 

Phone 4-5573 
5th at Cherry 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



WARNER FLOORING GO. 

FLOOR COVERINGS 

LINOLEUM RUGS and CARPETS 
RUBBER and ASPHALT TILE 

626 W. Fourth St. Tel. 6023 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



We Appreciafe Your Patronage 
Complete Auto Service 

Downtown Garage 

Day — STORAGE — Night 
431 N. Main St. Dial 8177 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



BOCOCK-STROUD 
COMPANY 

Your Sporting Goods Center 
Fourth at Spruce St. Dial 4-2421 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



DAVIS INSURANCE 
SERVICE 

Incorporated 

All Forms of Insurance 

836 Nissen Bldg. Dial 4-8326 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



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REYNOLDA, Inc. 

® Plumbing 
• Heating 
• Landscaping 
• Greenhouses 

Ph one 2-1343, Reynolda, N. C. 
WINSTON-SALEM 



1340 on your dial = 



1 WAIR 1 

| WAIR-FM I 

1 AMERICAN 1 

| BROADCASTING 1 

1 COMPANY | 

1 WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. E 



ZINZENDORF LAUNDRY 

Dry Cleaners — Rug Cleaners 
Dial 2-5178 WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



FIVE Complete Stores 

in ONE 
Roof-Top Parking for 
Over 300 Cars 




801 W. 4th St. Dial 4-4461 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



I - 

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Radio Station 1 

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"980 On Your | 

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"Serving the Negro people in = 

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Gasoline — Fuel — Motor Oil — Kerosene 
DIAL 2-1353 

LEONARD OIL COMPANY 

Prompt, Courteous Delivery of Fuel Oil and Kerosene 
Haled St. WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



America's Finest 



F OWENS-CORNING 
IBERGLASS 

Home Insulation 



All Metal Weather 

Stripping 
Aluminum Storm 
Windows & Doors 

212 N. Trade Dial 2-3821 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



80 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



The Following Firms in . . . 

HICKORY - STATESYILLE, N. C. 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 



The FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
OF CATAWBA COUNTY 

HICKORY, N. C. 



ELECTRIC WIRING COMPANY j 

Commercial — Industrial — Domestic Installations j 



I 

j 1341 First Ave. S.W. 

i 



Dial 741 I 



HICKORY, N. C. 



* 

Duncan Plumbing & Heating Co. 



• 122 Court St. 



Contracting and Repairing 



STATESYILLE, N. C. 



Dial 3412 ' 



fc. X X X X X X 



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BELK'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

DRY GOODS, CLOTHING, NOTIONS, SHOES, 
READY-TO-WEAR 

STATESVILLE, N. C. 

HllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllilllllllinillllllMlllllllliriiMiCIMIIIIIIKIIIilillllll 



Hickory 
G Hildebran 



Granite Falls 
Valdese 



HICKORY TELEPHONE CO. 

HICKORY, N. C. 



SPALNHOUR'S 

Hickory's Leading Store 

Fashions for Men, Women and Children 
HICKORY, N. C. 



PARAMOUNT MOTOR SALES 




Phone 7716 



Sales & Service 
HICKORY, N. C. 



19 4th St. S.W. 



poncnts of the McCarran-Walter 
legislation betray no sign of willing- 
ness to modify or alleviate the Act's 
racist provisions. For the past year, 
the McCarran- Walter clique has 
met every suggestion for a change 
in the national origins quota system, 
the keystone of our present immi- 
gration laws, with virulent if not 
slanderous opposition. 

Racism Issue 
The national origins quota system 
under which the overall annual 
quota of 1 54,000 is allocated among 
the various countries of the world 
in the same proportion which per- 
sons deriving from those countries 
bore to the total white population 
of the United States in 1920, was 
enacted in 1924 by a Congress 
caught up in the anti-alien excite- 
ment of World War I. It repre- 
sented then and represents today 
a blatant attempt to shut out the so- 
called "new immigrants" from 
southern and eastern Europe and to 
encourage immigration of those of 
presumably "superior stock" from 
northern and western Europe. 

The racism of the national origin 
quota plan is supplemented by a 
provision which imputes to peoples 
deriving from the so-called "Asia- 
Pacific Triangle," a contaminating 
ancestry from which they cannot 
escape no matter to what ends of 
the earth they may flee. In appar- 
ent contradiction to the national 
origin system, the new law requires 
that persons who derive as much 
as one-half of their ancestry from 
countries within this "Asia-Pacific 
Triangle," which includes the whole 
of Afghanistan, Burma, China, Indo- 
China, Korea, Japan and India, are 
required to obtain visas under the 
minisculc quotas granted those 
countries, no matter in what place 
they actually were born. To keep 
out Italians, Greeks and Slavs, the 
McCarran - Walter Act relies on 
place of birth and relies on ancestry 
under the "Asia-Pacific Triangle" 
provision. In either case, the Act 
treats individual worth, merit and 
need as completely irrelevant. 
New Emergency DP Law 
Despite the unrelenting opposi- 
tion of the McCarran-Walter bloc 
which it rests, arc repealed. Presi- 



in Congress, adocates of a humane 
and civilized immigration statute 
have been untiring in pressing for 
revision of the law. During the 
closing days of the last session of 
Congress, President Eisenhower and 
the present Administration suc- 
ceeded in enacting an emergency 
refugee bill granting 214,000 extra 
quota visas to expellees and refu- 
gees during the next three and one- 
half years. The emergency bill, 
however, leaves intact the worst fea- 
tures of the McCarran-Walter Act 
and disturbs none of its discrimina- 
tory provisons. The emergency ref- 
ugee measure may possibly help to 
regain some of the status this coun- 
try lost abroad through the enact- 
ment of the McCarran-Walter law, 
but we can never fully undo the 
harm wrought bv that legislation 
until its basic concepts, particularly 
the national origins quota system on 
dent Eisenhower recognized that 
fact during his campaign for the 
presidency last Fall when he re- 
peatedly promised to lead the fight 
against the national origin plan. 
Last April, the President sent a per- 
sonal message to Senator Watkins, 
as chairman of the Senate Judiciary 
Committee, urging early Congres- 
sional consideration be given to 
changing ten of the most serious 
shortcomings of the permanent Mc- 
Carran - Walter Immigration Law 
omitting, surprisingly, any reference 
to the national origins system. To 
date nothing has been done. 

Enactment of the emergency bill 
demonstrates what the President can 
achieve, even in the face of deter- 
mined opposition, when he chooses 
to exercise forceful leadership. It is 
earnestly to be hoped that the 
President will be spurred by the 
successful passage of the temporary 
refugee measure to redeem his elec- 
tion pledges for basic revision of 
the permanent immigration laws. 





Season's Greetings from 

New Melville's 



HICKORY, N. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



81 



The Rabbi's Dilemma 

(Continued From Page 58) 



bride's birth. After some unhappy 
moments the president admitted 
that his wife was of Irish descent 
but that she was converted to Juda- 
ism by a rabbi who tied them in 
marriage. But the rabbi was still 
unimpressed and he kept on press- 
ing for more information. Could he 
produce the marriage certificate? 
Was there any other written evi- 
dence of the marriage? Were there 
any living witnesses to the marriage? 
The indignant president was now 
beginning to lose his patience. He 
did not relish the cross-examination. 
Much time had passed since he mar- 
ried the woman and he doubted he 
could produce the requested evi- 
dence. Moreover, he plainly told 
the rabbi that he did not think it 
worth the effort. 

Trying a new ^approach, the rabbi 
threw out the suggestion that all 
would be well if the bride were 
converted to Judaism. The presi- 
dent's reaction to this suggestion 
was a violent one. In uncontrolled 
anger he demanded to know wheth- 
er it was a rabbi's function to ruin 
a family. He had kept the secret 
from his children for more than 
twenty years and, in fact, had eradi- 
cated it even from his own mind 
and now a capricious rabbi would 
have him gather his children, for 
whose Jewishness he bled, and shout 
into their faces that they were Gen- 
tiles. "I thought the days of the 
Inquisition are long past", the irate 
president shouted as he left the 
rabbi. 

That night the rabbi did not close 
an eyelash as he contemplated the 
dilemma. At the break of dawn he 
set out for consultation with a prom- 
inent rabbi in an adjacent town. 
But the law on that point was clear 
and inexorable. Unceremoniously 
the rabbi advised the president that 
under no circumstances would be 
perform the ceremony. 

In the meantime the community 
began sensing the rupture between 
the two men, and although the 
cause of the tension was a deep 
secret there developed at once a 
schism in the community, some 
siding with the rabbi and others 
with the popular president. 

However, on the day before the 
wedding the president's wife made a 
surprise visit to the rabbi's home. 
Without much ado she told the 
bewildered rabbi: "You will perform 
the marriage ceremony at my daugh- 
ter's wedding". The distraught 
rabbi, claiming illness, tried to ex- 
tricate himself but there was no 



denying the woman's hopes. As he 
stared in amazement at his visitor, 
the woman smilingly told him that 
she was in fact a Jewish woman and 
that her children too were Jewish. 

While the woman elaborated on 
the theme, the now healthy rabbi 
almost staggered as he reached out 
for a chair near the table. Her hus- 
band had returned broken-hearted 
from his conversation with the 
rabbi. He could not bear the 
thought that his children were pure 
and unadulterated goyim. And then 
a brilliant thought occurred to her. 
If the religion of children is de- 
termined by their maternal origin, 
herself was of a Jewish mother who 
did not abandon her faith when she 
tied her fate with a non-Jew under 
regrettable circumstances. To prove 
her origin, the president's wife pro- 
duced letters from her mother that 
were virtually in the category of 
dying testaments. Every line of the 
letters breathed with a spirit of Jew- 
ishness and bespoke convincing at- 
tachment to the ancient faith. 

But there was still an unanswered 
question. Why had her husband 
concealed that fact when one word 
could have prevented so much an- 
guish and embarrassment? Lowering 
her head, the woman replied: "My 
mother made one more unnecessary 
and wayward step — she became a 
Christian before my younger sister's 
birth. Father brutally insisted on 
that and she simply could not resist 
the pressure. My husband was 
ashamed to bring her name upon his 
lips, but I know, rabbi, and I am 
prepared to say it under sacred 
oath, that in her heart my mother 
remained a Jewess all her life." 

The rabbi of course was now well 
enough to perform the ceremony in 
accordance with the laws of Israel 
(Please Turn To Page 93) 




Jimmy Durante, who received B'nai 
B'rith's annual Humanitarian Award 
during a half-hour radio show broad- 
cast over the NBC network. 



| MAYFAIR 

j CHENILLES, Inc. 



CALHOUN, GA. 



SPARKS 

Incorporated 
D A L TON, GA. 




Sellers Manufacturing 
Company 

Royal Cotton Mill Co. 

COTTON YARNS 
Mercerized — Carded — Combed 

.... Sales Office . . . 
SAXAPAHAW, NORTH CAROLINA 



j Dial 9004-5-6 

i 



Est. 1917 



L. Gordon Iron & Metal Company 



! SCRAP IRON 
I 

i 



STEEL TIN METALS 
COMPRESSED STEEL 

STATESVILLE, N. C. 



Best Wishes for the New Year 

FRALEY'S 
FOOD FAIR 

STATESVILLE, N. C. 



RAYLASS 

Department Stores 

Everything to Wear 
for the Entire Family 

STATESVILLE, N. C. 



WASTE 



Season's Greetings 

MERCHANTS & 
FARMERS BANK 

STATESVILLE, N. C. 
Branch at Troutman, N. C. 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 



STATESVILLE 
LAUNDRY 

350 S. Green St. Dial 4371 

STATESVILLE, N. C. 



Hickory Foundry & Machine Shop 

GENERAL REPAIRS — PROMPT SERVICE 
RENEW MOTOR BEARINGS — GEAR CUTTING 



9th Ave. and 21st St. 



HICKORY, N. C. 



Tel. 2-7982 



82 



The Following Firms in . . . 

RALEIGH - DURHAM, N. C. 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 

DURHAM, N. C. 



PINE STATE 

MILK * ICE CREAM 
DAIRY PRODUCTS 

PINE STATE CREAMERY 

RALEIGH * OXFORD 

SOUTHERN ICE CREAM CO. 

HENDERSON 



SERVED IN NORTH CAROL-I N"A. SINCE 1919 




FRIENDLY CLEANERS 

We Specialize in Evening Wear and Wedding Gowns 

2910 Hillsboro Street Dial 3-6667 

• BRANCH OFFICES # 

HQ E. Morgan Street — 416 W. South Street — 1106 W. Cabarrus Street 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



RALEIGH TRAILER SALES 

R. S. ROYALL, Owner 

Dealer in New and Used Trailers 

LONG TERM FINANCING 

5420 Hillsboro Rd. RALEIGH, N. C. Dial 3-2706 



OPTICAL LABORATORY 

GREIG L. HICKS, Manager 
Basement Professional Building Phones 3-4629 — 3-4620 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



G. S. TUCKER & BROS.. Inc. 

"Raleigh's Oldest Furniture Store" 
Quality Furniture at Reasonable Prices 

12 E. Hargett Street Phone 2-2563 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Chinese and 
American Foods 

TEMPTINGLY PREPARED 
— in — 

THE ORIENTAL 
MANNER 

Canton Cafe 

Fully Air-Conditioned 
408 Hillsboro Dial 9224 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



CLARK 

ART SHOP 

Nationally Advertised 
Rugs and Linoleum 

VENETIAN 
BLINDS 

Dial 8319 
300 Glenwood Avenue 
RALEIGH, N. C. 




Mrs. Sam Freedman, Correspondent 



Hello folks!! Missed the last is- 
sue, don't want to be late again and 
miss wishing everyone A Happy 
New Year. The best sign that the 
New Year is approaching is the ar- 
rival in the mails of all sorts of 
literature with New Year greetings. 
Also, Eva Lieberman is another 
sure sign that the New Year holi- 
days are approaching — for this is 
the time that Eva is busy contacting 
everyone for their New Year's greet- 
ings for the Sisterhood Annual 
which she and Mrs. Sam Freedman 
are compiling. Eva is the commu- 
nity's number one fund raiser. 

The summer vacationists are be- 
ginning to trek back to Durham — it 
will be so good to see and hear 
them relate their interesting experi- 
ences. Already Mayor and Mrs. E. 
J. Evans have returned from their 
trip to Israel — the Mayor has ap- 
peared before many civic clubs in 
the city; and Sara is scheduled for 
many talks for Hadassah — the best 
ambassadors we have! 

Mrs. Joe Rose, Dottie to all, has 
just returned from an extended 
three months trip to Europe. Dottic 
was in England for the Coronation; 
her itenerary also included a trip to 
Paris where she was the guest of 
Mrs. S. Shapiro, our Rebbctzin; 
then on to Rome and Israel where 
she spent many weeks touring the 
country. Dottie, too, is scheduled 
to speak to us for several of our af- 
fairs. Only yesterday she was the 
guest speaker at the kick-off break- 
Ideal Plumbing & 
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Plumbing and Heating 

Contractor 
Repair Work a Specialty 
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RALEIGH, N. C. 



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Painting and Interior 
Decorating 

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RALEIGH, N. C. 



fast for the Hadassah Year Book 
in the Wcdgewood Room at the 
Washington Duke Hotel. The H. 
M. O. solicitors were told some 
very interesting experiences that 
Dottie encountered on her many 
tours thru Israel. She was so inspir- 
ing that many of the solicitors were 
fired with determination to go out 
that morning and make greater ef- 
forts to get greater increases on all 
their ads. 

A few weeks ago, the many 
friends of Mr. and Mrs. M. Peck 
were hovered around their televi- 
sion sets to watch the program, 'Til 
Buy That". Harvey Peck sold a live 
lobster for $150 cash on that pro- 
gram. Congratulations, Harvey, 
come on home and let the sister- 
hood in on some of your unusual 
ideas of making money, please. 

Mr. and Mrs. N. Wolf have just 
returned from Miami, Florida. 
Claire has been appointed the rep- 
resentative of the Women's Organi- 
zations Division of t h e National 
Jewish Welfare Board on the Vol- 
untary Service Hospital Advisory 
Committee in Durham. A big title 
and job! 

Mrs. Maurice A. Goldberg of 
Washington, D. C, was guest 
speaker at a meeting of the Nathan 
Rosenstein Lodge of B'nai B'rith. 
Sigmund Meyer, Lodge President, 
presided. The meeting was attend- 
ed by members, their wives and 
guests. 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



83 



Mrs. Goldberg spoke very inter- 
estingly and informatively on the 
women's program of B'nai B'rith. 
Guests were then invited to a beau- 
tifully appointed table. 

Everyone in Durham is always 
glad to see Leon Moel come back 
from his summer home, Virginia 
Beach. Leon never leaves Durham 
without taking someone with him 
as his guest. Among the many visi- 
tors at the summer home have 
been: Joe Rose; Charlie Wilson; 
Mr. and Mrs. George Lewin and 
family, and others. 

Natalie Moel had as her guest for 
several weeks at Virginia Beach 
Lubah Freedman and Carol Bloom- 
field. The girls report that Florence 
and Leon Moel, Natalie's parents, 
exemplify the perfect hosts that 
Emily Post wrote about. 

Carol Bloomfield and Lubah 
Freedman attended Wild Acres in 
Little Switzerland and are now the 
guests of Ina Faub and Barbara 
Herman in Winston-Salem. 

Leah Bloomfield, Fabianne, Glen- 
da and Karen Wolfe, Melvin Gor- 
don were campers at Camp Blue 
Star. 

Congratulations to Robert Lip- 
ton upon his election of president 
of the newly organized Durham So- 
ciety for Financing the fight against 
Dread Diseases. 

Mrs. }. Baker was the guest of 
her daughter, Mrs. I. Zelon and 



Mr. Zelon. Mrs. Baker was the 
guest at a lovely luncheon at the 
Washington Duke Hotel given by 
her daughter. Many other courte- 
sies have been extended to Mrs. 
Baker during her stay in the city. 

Mr. and Mrs. Murray Weissman 
and two sons, Larry and Ricky of 
Brooklyn, N. Y., were the visitors 
of Mrs. Weissman's sister, Mrs. 
Paul Yeyser and Mr. Keyser and 
family. The came especially to see 
their new nephew and cousin, Alan 
Keyser. 

Mrs. Lena Katz has just returned 
from Washington, D. C, where she 
visited her daughter, Marice. 

My. and Mrs. Mannie Blum have 
returned from an enjoyable trip to 
New York. 

On the sick list this month arc: 
Mr. Sam Freedman, Mr. Charlie 
Margolis and Mrs. E. J. Evans- — we 
wish them all a speedy recovery. 
Also, we hope that Mr. Dave Berg- 
man is resting more comfortably. 

Condolences are extended to 
Mrs. Harry Goldberg on the loss of 
her mother, Mrs. A. Greenstone of 
Staunton, Va. 

Mrs. Ellis Goldman of Washing- 
ton, D. C, is the guest of her broth- 
er, Mr. Harry Bergman and Mrs. 
Bergman. 

The Durham Community wishes 
to extend to all greeting for a very 
Happy and Peaceful New Year. 



IS THE DIASPORA IN EXILE? 

(Continued From Page 21) 



struction was due to external rather 
than internal causes. One need but 
recall the fate of German and Polish 
Jewry in our own day. 

Can a healthy social organism, 
which knows how to keep the bal- 
ance between adjustment and inde- 
pendence, be said to have been in 
exile? Innumerable authors (Yitz- 
hak Baer, the historian, and Martin 
Buber, the theologian, most recent- 
ly) have pointed out the Diaspora's 
refusal to forget the national home- 
land. The Jewish heart always 
ached for the land of the people's 
birth and Jewish eyes always looked 
forward to its restoration. Ample 
proof of this attitude is found in 
the writings and prayers of the past. 



Clearly the Jews were not satisfied 
with their lot. What else would 
one expect, in view of the oppres- 
sion to which thev were subjected? 
Their neighbors did everything pos- 
sible to keep the Jews from feeling 
at home among them. At the same 
time, Jewish imagination could mag- 
nify the glories of the past and pro- 
vide solace through dreams of a fu- 
ture which would fulfill every vearn- 
ing and justify every hope. More- 
over, God's promise of a national 
restoration was explicit in the sacred 
writings; and our ancestors, feeling 
that they were far from that state 
of holiness in which they believed 
a Jew must live, naturally looked for- 
ward to the Messianic era when a 



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DURHAM, N. C. 



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225 Foster St.— Phone 3-8121 
DURHAM, N. C. 



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1914 Perry Street Dial 8-1123 
DURHAM, N. C. 



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NEW METHOD 
Laundry and 
Dry Cleaners, Inc. 
CALL 6959 

DURHAM, N. C. 



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PEPSI COLA BOTTLING CO. OF DURHAM, N. C. 



84 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




Featuring Popular Priced Merchandise 

General Offices, I 14 E. Chapel Hill Street 
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 

UNITED DEPT. STORES CO., DURHAM, N. C. 
BURLINGTON UNITED DEPT. STORE, BURLINGTON, N. C. 
NACHAMSON'S DEPT. STORE CO., KINSTON, N. C. 
UNITED DEPT. STORES, REIDSVILLE, N. C. 
UNITED DEPT. STORES CO., SUFFOLK, VA. 
UNITED DEPT. STORES CO., MARTINSVILLE, VA. 



Durham Distributing Co., Inc. 

The Beer That Made Milwaukee Famous 




Phone 4-8501 

E. PETTIGREW ST. DURHAM, N. C. 




Hurtz Driv-Ur-Self 
System Licensee 

U-DRIVE-IT 
AUTO COMPANY, Inc. 

Raleigh-Durham Airport 
Phone 4-5862 
202 Cleveland Street 
Phones 4993 - 4994 
DURHAM, N. C. 



O'Brient's i 

Music Store : 

Magnavox, Admiral 
and GE Television 
Combinations 
Records and Sheet Music 



13 W. Parrish Street 

Phone 2-6261 
DURHAM, N. C. 



CARY LUMBER COMPANY 

A Complete Line of Building Materials 
for the Better Builder 

208 Milton Ave. Dial 2161 

DURHAM, N. C. 



Wm. Muirhead Construction Co. 

Building Contractors 

DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



holy people would live in the Holy 
Land. They considered themselves 
in exile; nevertheless, they had a 
sense of belonging which is the es- 
sence of feeling at home. 

The exile, for a large number of 
Jews, began with their emancipation. 
They were granted political rights 
and, somewhat grudgingly and by 
no means universally, admitted to 
social equality. In theory the exile 
ended. But the payment that was 
expected and rendered was in spir- 
itual coin, with the result that the 
actual exile only now began. For 
most western Jews exiled themselves 
from Jewish cultural activity, from 
the basic concepts of Jewish religious 
life. They fortified their sense of 
alienation even further by centering 
their attention on their would-be 
persecutors. They were so eager to 
be loved, or at least accepted as 
complete equals, that they willingly 
discarded much of that which had 
given the Diaspora communities 
creative personality. They made 
themselves indistinguishable from 
the undistinguished mass, yet thev 
continued to suffer from the fear 
or rejection. They thus acquired 
the characteristics of an exile: tim- 
idity, a sense of homelessness, a lost 
of self-respect. This kind of exile 
is, indeed, deserving of sympathy. 
This kind of Diaspora will destroy 
itself and leave the continuation of 
Jewish life only to the national com- 
munity in Israel. 

Should this happen, it would 
mean a loss to Jewish as well as non- 
Jewish civilization. Both would lose, 
not only the variety upon which cul- 
ture thrives, but also the positive 
values, the viewpoints and the an- 
swers to social problems which Juda- 
ism offers. For a generation as con- 
fused and misguided as ours, so ter- 
rified of its problems and of its own 
nature that it seeks to escape to 
otherworldliness, the wisdom of 
Judaism can still serve as a balm, 
provided the Diaspora Jew learns 
to live by it and exemplify it. The 
Diaspora's going into self-imposed 
exile is losing for Judaism an unri- 
valled opportunity to rise to great 
heights in freedom and to serve 
mankind in joy. 

Essentially this is a problem for 
the individual Diaspora Jew. Self- 
imposed exile requires no redeemer 
other than oneself. It remains true, 



however, that Jewish leadership 
must show the way. Various insti- 
tutions and community organiza- 
tions have, in fact, grown increas- 
ingly aware of their duty in this re- 
spect, a duty which goes far beyond 
fighting antisemitism and is at least 
equal to the alleviation of distress. 
A conference for this special pur- 
pose has long been agitated. It 
would serve to clarify the goal and 
perhaps hit upon a method. 

One means surely must be to en- 
courage the Diaspora Jew to read 
books of Jewish interest and con- 
tent. He must be re-introduced to 
his ancestors. Thus far, all he knows 
about them is that they were per- 
secuted and that they suffered. But 
why thev were persecuted and for 
what they were willing to suffer 
remain mysteries to the average 
Jew. He is not even aware that the 
beauties of his faith and the dignity 
of his life played a larger role in the 
Jewish past than did the sufferings 
and the persecution. Nor does he 
suspect that, like his ancestors, he 
himself has more to give to his 
milieu than to receive from it. 

Yet scholars have worked to make 
all these matters clear. Books exist 
on these aspects of Jewish life and 
more are being written and pub- 
lished constantly. Picking almost at 
random from among volumes which 
have appeared quite recently, one 
can point to an excellent study of 
Jewish law (George Horowitz's "The 
Spirit of Jewish Law," published by 
the Central Book Company), to an 
instructive presentation of Jews who 
cooperated in the development of 
the United States (Jacob R. Marcus' 
"Earlv American Jewry." Volumes 
1 and 2, the J. P. S.), to a stimulat- 
ing collection of essays on Jewish 
life in Europe during the Middle 
Ages (Cecil Roth's "Personalities 
and Events in Jewish History). The 
most comprehensive discussion of 
the subject in English will be, when 
it is completed, S. W. Baron's "A 
Social and Religious History of the 
Jews" (Columbia University Press 
and the J. P. S.), of which thus far 
two volumes have already appeared. 
Novels for adults and stories for 
children can also serve this purpose. 

An important book published 
during the past year deals with the 
(Please Turn To Page 86) 
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RILEY PAINT CO. 

Paints — Varnishes 

£ 322 Chapel Hill Phone 9-1971 

£ DURHAM, N. C. 

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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



85 



CHARLESTON, S. C. 

Mrs. Irving M. Robinson, Correspondent 



The Sisterhood of Synagogue 
Emanu-El held it's first board meet- 
ing of the year 1953-54, at the home 
of the president, Mrs. Irving Solo- 
mon. 

The following names were an- 
nounced as the chairman of the fol- 
lowing committees: 

Synagogue Suppers: Mrs. Sam Co- 
hen and Mrs. A. L. Cohen; Thrift 
Shop: Mrs. Milton Banov, Mrs. 
Leon Steinberg, Mrs. }. A. Spar; Fi- 
nance: Mrs. Edward Kronsberg; 
Floral Fund: Mrs. Matthew Stein- 
berg; Torah Fund: Mrs. Donald Co- 
hen; Synagogue Affairs: Mrs. Hy- 
man Rephan, Mrs. Gus Perlman, 
Mrs. William Pearlman; Book 
Shop: Mrs. Leon Steinberg; Mem- 
bership:: Mrs. Moses Sharnoff, Mrs. 
Milton Abrams; Leagrams: Mrs. 
Melvin Bluestein, Mrs. Abram 
Berry, Mrs. William Ackerman; 
Budget: Mrs. George Bogin; Sister- 
hood Luncheons: Mrs. Irving Stein- 
berg; Kitchen: Mrs. Lewis Wein- 
traub; Sick Committee: Mrs. Dan 
Vane, Mrs. Robert Cohen, Mrs. 



Mitchell Robinson; House Commit- 
tee: Mrs. N. Berkman; Kiddish 
Treats: Mrs. Jacob Renzer, Mrs. S. 
Toporek, Mrs. Frank Kline; Friday 
Night Refreshments: Mrs. Irving 
Levkoff, Mrs. Leonard Karesh; Hos- 
pitality: Mrs. Sidney Raskind; Min- 
yon Breakfast: Mrs. J. Bluestein; 
Minyon for Mothers: Mrs. Jack To- 
porek; Program: Mrs. Joe Dumas, 
Mrs. N. Frisch, Mrs. L. Toporek; 
Sunday School: Mrs. Robert Wearb; 
Communtiv Cooperation: Mrs. J. 
Meddin, Mrs. A. H. Levkoff; Juda- 
ism in the Home: Mrs. Morris Ros- 
en, Mrs. Louis Tanenbaum; P. T. 
A.: Mrs. J. Needle, Mrs. Sidney 
Rittenberg; Telephone Committee: 
Mrs. Mose Mendelsohn; Social Ac- 
tion: Mrs. Arthur Rittenberg; Pub- 
licity: Mrs. Irving M. Robinson. 

The new officers are: President, 
Mrs. Irving Solomon;; 1st vice presi- 
dent, Mrs. Milton Kronsberg; 2nd 
vice pres., Mrs. Saul Krawcheck; 3rd 
vice pres., Mrs. Abe Dumas; treasur- 
er, Mrs. Sidney Addlestone; record- 
ing secretary, Mrs. Gus Simon; cor- 



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CHARLESTON, S. C. 



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10 Mile Dial 4-5393 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



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The Following Firms in . . . 

CHARLESTON, S. C, 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 




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CHARLESTON'S 

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DA IRY 




Season's Greetings from * 

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The Store of Fashion j 

234 Bull St. ! 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 1 



Neiu Year's Greetings 



To All Our Jewish Friends 



The Citizens & Southern National Bank 

of South Carolina 

Charleston — Columbia — Spartanburg 



The Carolina Mutual Insurance Co. 

Organized 1851 
Fire Insurance — Windstorm 

"A Legal Reserve Mutual Fire Insurance Company, All Policies Non-Assessable" 

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Time-Tried Company 

37 Broad Street— HOME OFFICE— Charleston, S. C. 

"Dividends to Policy Holders" E. EDWARD WEHMAN, Jr., President 



AL'S 

DELICATESSEN 

and 

RESTAURANT 

AIR-CONDITIONED 

For Your Comfort 

478 King St. Dial 2-4681 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 

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• shopping center 
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• national brands for 
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86 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



For Your Drug Store Needs 

Dial 2-2460 

Registered Druggists 

CONWAY 

DRUG COMPANY 

City-Wide Delivery 

617 King Street 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



Onslow's Candy Store, 
Luncheonette and 
Soda Fountain 

HOME-MADE CANDIES AND 
DELICIOUS LUNCHES 

334 King Street 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



ROSALIE 
MEYERS 

Feminine Apparel 

Phone 3-7321 3 Liberty St. 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



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McCRARY 1 

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Company = 

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CHARLESTON, S. C. I 



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517 King Street 
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Magnolia Sign Co. 

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and SIGNS of ALL KINDS 

P. O. Box 75 Dial 2-4748 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



ICE CREAM 



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responding secretary Mrs. Sam Alt- 
man; financial secretary, Mrs. Harry 
Appel; board of directors, Mrs. Na- 
than Goldberg, Mrs. Melvin Blue- 
stein; auditor, Mrs. J. A. Spar. 



Unto Them A Son Is Born 

(Concluded From Page 64) 

over his tragedies. If he is victorious 
over the calamities that befall him. 
I saw it in the Resistance against 
the Nazis. Those who really fought 
came out of the war better, stronger. 
Those who quailed, those who com- 
promised, those who hid away, 
blanching in fear, they came out of 
the war broken. It is not the trial 
which matters but how a human 
being meets it." 

For a long moment, Elana could 
not answer, feeling sleep sweeping 
over her. Then she roused herself 
to confess, "Before my son was 
born, I hated everyone on the ship. 
Now I am proud of them." 

The French doctor nodded, un- 
derstandingly. "I am proud of all 
of you too,' she said. 



Is The Diaspora In Exile? 

(Concluded From Page 84) 

spiritual odyssey of Franz Rosen- 
zweig (Nahum N. Glatzer's "The 
Life and Thought of Franz Rosen- 
zwcig," a Schoken Book published 
by Farrar, Straus and Young and the 
}. P. S.), that extraordinary inter- 
preter of Judaism hardly a quarter 
of a century ago. Brought up in an 
assimilationist atmosphere, he made 
up his mind to enter the Church. 
But he was sentimental enough to 
want to bid good-bye to Judaism 
and therefore spent one Yom Kip- 
pur in an orthodox Eastern Euro- 
pean synagogue. His sensitive spirit 
penetrated beneath externals and he 
recognized in Judaism a nobler and 
more complete answer to his spir- 
itual needs than anything he 
thought he had found elsewhere. 
If one may put the story of Rosen- 
zweig's life into other words, his 
family had carried their child into 
exile; he was about to surrender 
the last vestige of individuality; but 
he found himself in time and dedi- 
cated his life to leading the Diaspora 
into spiritual freedom. Rosenzweig's 
story is symbolic of our generation 
in the Diaspora. We ourselves will 
choose whether we are to remain in 
exile or become a creative commun- 
ity, having an equal share in the 
Jewish future with a creative Israel. 



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H. O. RILEY, Manager 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



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790 Meeting St. Dial 2-3863 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



: FAMOUS : 

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• Opens 5:30 P. AL • Dial 3-12V 

Savannah Highway 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 




JACOBS 

HOSIERY CO. 

WHOLESALERS 

223 Meeting St. 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



THOMPSON-MILER 
HARDWARE CORP. 

Wholesale 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



ROBERTSON AND 
VENNING 

Insurance 

63 Broad Street Dial 8125 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



87 



Economize at the 



11 



ECONOMY 

SUPER MARKET 



Rivers Ave. 
at 

5 Mile Viaduct 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



You'll Enjoy 

Swifts 
Ice Cream 



CHARLESTON, S. C. 



La BRASCA 

SPAGHETTI HOUSE 

Italian Spaghetti 
Chicken — Steaks 

975 King St. Dial 3-5667 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



McDAID BROTHERS, Inc. 

Wholesale Distributors 
Lighting Fixtures 
Electrical Supplies ♦ Appliances 
33 Hayne St. Dial 3-4561 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



JUDAEN DESTINY 

(Continued From Page 8) 

do about this." He sighed. Then 
he resumed. "The Croatians too, 
and the Dalmatians, Turks and 
Northerners, Alemanni and Russi, 
from the Frankish coasts to Corfu, 
are pillaging and destroying fields 
and homesteads. There is kidnap- 
ping and more slave trade than ever. 
What defensive measures are there? 
Even the galleasses sailing from 
Venice must go in convoys for pro- 
tection." 

"I know, Rabbi. I have experi- 
enced the results in my business." 
He smiled wryly. "Our losses have 
been heavy these last few years, but 
we can manage." 

"Yes, Don Immanuel, but the 
restlessness is spreading over the 
Eastern frontiers as well, and over 
the Northern regions. You've heard 
of the Baltic pirates, under Ruric? 
And the Italian cities warring 
against each other. And most of all, 
those Hungari from the Eastern 
plains. They have been scurrying 
over the provinces like monstrous 
barbarians. What do they fear of 
Greek fire or longbows? They have 
small swift horses that carry them 
night and day over the plains. I 
have heard tales ..." The Rabbi 
halted, and a look of fear came from 
his eyes.' So you are right, Don 
Immanuel. The Holy Land will 
give you peace, and security. A wise 
counsel." 

"It is not that alone, Rabbi, that 
has helped my decision. My work 
is done." The Radanitc made a 
sweeping outflung gesture with his 
hands. "My dear Zipporah is gone. 
I have enough means. What can 
hold me here? See, my bales have 
been carried by barge and flat stlata 
over the Rhone; by galleass and 




LEO J. DAWSON 
& SON 

Plumbing and Heating 
18 Gaillard St. Dial 2-0555 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



TRIEST & SHOLK 

Insurance — Real Estate 
59 Broad 8226 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



ACE 
EMPLOYMENT 
AGENCY 

COMPLETE SERVICE TO 
EMPLOYER AND EMPLOYEE 

65 Society St. Phone 3-4627 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 




Southern Homefurnishers 
Since 1885 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



E. B. GRIFFIN 
Auto Paint & Body 
Shop 

"NO JOB TOO LARGE OR 
TOO SMALL" 

577 Meeting St. Phone 2-4460 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



de MORE S 

Canvas Goods - Awnings 
Furniture Upholstering 

540 Meeting St. Dial 2-1548 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



BAILEY'S 

OFFICE SUPPLIES 

Complete Line 

135 E. Bay St. Dial 3-2680 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 

BUTT'S ELECTRICAL 
SUPPLY COMPANY 

Wholesale 

480 E. Bay Dial 5786 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



McGorty's Typewriter 
Service and Supply 

TYPEWRITERS REPAIRED 
Complete Duplicating and 
Addressing Service 

162 E. Bay Dial 2-0154 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



BURBAGE TIRE 
COMPANY 

Sinclair Oil Products 

Contain RD119 Rust Preventive 
524 Meeting at Lee Dial 6295 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



McEVOY S GARAGE 

General Repairing — Wheel and 
Axle Aligning — Body and 
Fender Work 

396-398 Meeting St. Dial 5035 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



COULTER & POOSER 

Plumbing Contractor 

814 Spruill Avenue 
Dial 4-3948 
NORTH CHARLESTON, S. C. 



Greetings From 

COASTAL 

OUTDOOR 
ADVERTISING 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 

H. L. KOESTER 
& Son 

Wholesalers 

231 Meeting Dial 8814 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 




Observant Jews of the Talmudic (Byzan- 
tine) period fixed representations of a 
temple facade symbolizing the Lost 
Temple of Jerusalem on to the prayer- 
wall or East-wall (i. e., facing toward 
the Holy City) of their houses, hence 
the name "Misrah" which means East. 
Such reliefs from the Talmudic period 
and from Palestine are extremely rare, 
and this plaster relief is on loan from 
the collection of R. Jonas, Haifa. 



Sightseeing Tours by 
Limousine or Taxi 

CAROLINA 
CAB COMPANY 

93 Society St. Dial 5757 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



TAYLOR'S BAKERY 
KITCHEN 

Established 1938 

Jewish Bakery Products 

42 Spring St. Dial 2-0235 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



M. ROBINSON 
Florist 

FLOWERS FOR EVERY OCCASION 

Dial 5698 596 Rutledge Ave. 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



MOLONY 

Distributing Company 

Star Annex Dial 4-1602 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



88 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



DARLINGTON APARTMENTS 

Enjoy Comfortable Living in an 

"Efficiency" or "One Room" 
Apartment 

At the Beautiful Completely Air Conditioned 
14-Story Apartment Building 
at King and Mt. Pleasant Streets 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



I T TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT- 



T T T T T T T 



VAN-CM ITH COMPANY 

WAJUUE- ^ERVICE-Vo-QPERATIOll 



Building Material — Ready-Mixed Concrete 
276 East Bay Street Dial 8871 

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 



SAM SOLOMON CO. 

WHOLESALE 

Dry Goods — Notions — Ladies' Ready-to-Wear — Hosiery 
484 King Street Dial 7466 

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIillllllll 

AVONDALE PHARMACY 

Incorporated 

Self Service Drugs 
AVONDALE 

Dial 3-3079 Charleston, S. C. 

Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliii 




MOLONY FERTILIZER CO. 

Fertilizer and Fertilizer Materials 

Dial 4-5356 
CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 



FUEL OILS — FURNACE OLLS — KEROSENE 

Printed Gallonage Receipt Dial 2-1224 

SOLOMON OIL CO. 

Meeting Street Road CHARLESTON, S. C. 



balinger, by fishing craft and camel. 
Once I thought that my business 
was more than trade; it was a means 
of opening up new territories, bring- 
ing strange peoples together. Com- 
merce, I pondered, would be a 
handmaiden to human under- 
standing among the nations. So I 
thought, so I planned. It was, you 
will admit, Rabbi, an ambition." 

That Rabbi nodded, without com- 
mitting himself. "Perhaps," he 
interjected after some moments, 
"realizable; but too big for one man 
to attempt." 

They sat in the high ceilinged 
dining room, while Ali the Nubian 
softly cleared the table. 

"I had other interests too, Rabbi, 
as you may remember." The Rada- 
nite's eyes twinkled for a moment. 

"Yes, you once told me about 
your history of spices. How is it 
going?" 

"Slowly. There's so much to 
absorb, and I have touched only the 
fringes; but it has kept me busy 
these last years." 

"You will finish it, surely, when 
you get to the Holy Land. An ideal 
place for study." 

"Perhaps it was only a whim of 



mine, childish too, to care about 
potions and the properties of herbs 
and such things." 

"Not at all, Don Immanuel," the 
Rabbi soothed him. "All knowledge 
is our province. Our sages com- 
mend the practice." He rose, and 
the Radanite rose likewise. They 
went to their sleeping quarters with 
final greetings. 

When the Rabbi, in his capacity 
as agent for charities, left next 
morning, the Radanite called Guil- 
bert. 

"You will go to the waterfront 
when the next galleass comes in 
from Venice, and arrange for my 
sailing" 

"So you have decided, Master?" 

"I have. You will attend to the 
bedding, and the barrel of water on 
board? And pay the captain also 
his fee for cooking space on board, 
and a berth for myself. And also a 
seaman to look after me." 

"Don't worry about the details. 
1 shall arrange them. Have you 
planned the rest of the voyage?" 

"The usual route, I think. From 
Venice to Byzantium, G u i 1 b e r t. 
Thence to Joppa. From Joppa they 



"Gifts That Are Different" 
Hildebrand's Antique and Plating Co. 

76 Calhoun Street Dial 2-3275 

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 



International Harvester Co. 



TRUCKS 

1450 Meeting Street Road 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



Dial 3-2513 




IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIC 

McKETHAN OLDSMOBILE, j 

Inc. 

SALES 

SERVICE 

650 King Street — Phone 2-0594 '■ 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 

IMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIU 

ATLANTIC PAINT CO. 

Paints — Varnishes — Glass 
Imperial Wallpapers 

207 Meeting Street Dial 5761 

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



89 



say I can get to the Holy City in 
three days, by camel or mule." 

"And this?" Guilbert swept his 
arms over the counting-house, em- 
bracing, symbolically, the entire 
business of the Radanite. 

"For the present, you will be in 
charge, Guilbert. Let things remain 
as they are. And do not forget the 
weekly sums to our synagogue, and 
if the Rabbi comes next season, let 
him have fifty gold bezants." 

"So much, Master?" 

"Better for them than for the 
Dukek's borrowings, which have 
remained on our books for these 
twenty years. But I shall write down 
all my instructions, so that you can 
follow them as the need arises." 

During the next few weeks the 
Radanite wrote letters to relatives in 
Treves and Valence, to his agents 
in Venice, Kairouan, and Damascus. 
In the evenings, with the help of 
Guilbert, he examined the condition 
of his tradings, the statements of 
his agents, the warehouse inven- 



A Very Happy 
New Year 

CANNON 

DISTRIBUTING CO. 

Distributors of 
Outstanding 
Electrical Appliances 

198 E. Bay Dial 2-4108 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



A CHAMPION 
for all 
HOLIDAYS 




Distributed 
by 



I. M. Pearlsfine & Sons 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



tories. He went down into the cold 
vaulted cellars beneath his stone 
house and under the warehouse 
itself, and from large, strongly-pad- 
locked and iron-bound trunks he 
took out small bags of gold bezants, 
little leather wallets full of lapis 
lazuli, cornelians, rubies. He wrote 
an especially long and detailed letter* 
to the Rabbi of Safed. He inquired 
about a room that would face the 
valley, in a simple pious family. 
Lastly, he stacked in large leather 
bags personal items, family letters, 
and lockets that belonged to his wife 
Zipporah. Then he waited. 

In the counting-house there was, 
in these days, much whispering and 
conjecture. 

"I wonder why he wants to leave 
so soon. Trade is good and with 
the unrest that we all hear about 
from the Venetian sailors and the 
seamen from New Rome, there will 
soon be need of pikes and gauntlets 
and such. We'll be busy arming 
the soldiery." 

"And ourselves too, I think," a 
young scrivener put in. 

"In any case, the Master can't 
leave us like this, can he?" 

"Why not? You can go elsewhere, 
Rudolf. You're free." 

"No, I hear from Benedict that 
he may put one of us in charge, for 
some time, in any case." 

"Not you, anyway, Rudolf." 

The weeks passed, while, in the 
long silent evenings, Immanuel the 
Radanite sat, most of the time 
alone, dreaming of his wife, haunted 
by the flow of his past years. If 
only he would hear from Safed now. 
It was now gone on three months. 
Shortly the sailing season would 
open. He must be ready to go at 
the earliest moment. 



X 



x ^e memo/?//; 



GGANITf-M-ARBL-t 
BRONZ-E T-flBLETJ 
MAUSOLEUM J 




SUCCtSSOfcS lb £XVI£TT 

cMyQrs J).0. "gfiarlesjonS.t 
•Di-«L 9788 



Season's Greetings from 

SUPERIOR LAUNDRY 



4307 Bull St. 



SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



Phone 6-3344 



CALL FOR 



ClanSSenS 



BREAD 



CLAUSSEN BAKING CO. 

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 



DAN VANE 



JACK VANE 



Vane's United Phonograph Co. 

"Everything in Home Appliances" 

Dealers for Outstanding Lines of Refrigerators, Washing 
Machines, Radios, and Television Sets 



3 Stores for Your Convenience 
CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 



E. P. BOTZIS— Pharmacists— C. W. DUCKER 

HAMPTON PHARMACY 

The Most Modern Community Pharmacy in 
698 Rutledge CHARLESTON, S. C. Dial 5547 



NO DOWN PAYMENT — REMODELING - REPAIRS 
REPAY IN 5, 10, 15 YEARS 

Plumbing, Roofing, Brick and Asbestos Siding, Rooms Added, 
Concrete Porches, Built-up Roofs, Painting. Homes Built — 
FHA Financed. We will obtain the money for you. 

GERMAIN CONSTRUCTION, Inc. 

Insured Contractors Dial 2-0374 or 3-5573 

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 



'A Thinking Fellow Calls a Yellow" — DIAL 6565 « 

YELLOW - DIAMOND CAB CO. 

Cars Equipped With Two-Way Radio 
CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 



i Charleston Sheet Metal and Roofing Works, Inc. 

I ROOFING ♦ SHEET METAL WORK 

£ Heating and Air Conditioning Contractors 

£ 181 Church St. CHARLESTON, S. C. 3-4551 



90 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



1 nos. d. r\\ ien 






ALLEN & WEBB 


MILL 


SUPPLIES AND MACHINERY 


HEATING 


AND REFRIGERATION SUPPLIES 


176 Meeting St. 


Dial 2-7791 


CHARLESTON, S. C. 



MAXWELL BROS. & HALL 

Fine Furniture You Will Like 

360 King Street 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



W. C. WILBUR & COMPANY 

Real Estate — Insurance — All Lines 

5 Exchange Street Dial 8341 

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 

PLANTERS FERTILIZER 
and PHOSPHATE CO. 

Manufacturers 
CHARLESTON, S. C. 



iisiSSS SSiS: 



Powers Carpet Cleaning & Rug Co. 

Cleaning — Storage — Repairing 

Route I, Folly Beach Road Dial 5202 

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 



Carolina Sheet Metal & Roofing Company 

ROOFING • SHEET METAL 

Warm Air Heating and Service 

Dial 2-1767 — Highway No. 614 St. Andrews Parish 

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 



^!lll!lllillllllllll|||1}HlilllilllllllfllilllllllllllMIIII!!Illlllllllligigilll!i)!MS!!9lliDiliS!H9i!^ 

| BERLIN G. MYERS LUMBER CORP. | 

= LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIALS = 

| BUILDERS AND GENERAL HARDWARE | 

= Dial 4-6286 Reynolds Avenue at Meeting Street Road E 

1 CHARLESTON, S. C. § 

~jiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini? 

I GENERAL WHOLESALE CORP. 

= Wholesale Grocers = 

| 38 John St. 3-5319 = 

| CHARLESTON, S. C. | 



One morning a traveler stepped 
from a galleass that drew up in the 
Marseille harbor. He brought a 
letter to Immanuel from Safed. It 
had gone, in the usual way, to Joppa, 
from there to Byzantium, and from 
a Byzantine trading vessel to Venice 
and so to the Radanite. The writer 
was enthusiastic about Immanuel's 
plans. Come, he wrote, as you are. 
We shall take care of you. The 
land itself will take care of you, for 
we need little here; and our days 
and nights are devoted to studv. 

The Radanite was in good spirits. 
He spoke to the members of his 
synagogue. He called Benedict the 
porter and made him secure for the 
rest of his life. He had a long talk 
with Guilbert. 

"It is only a matter of a short 
time, now. A week at the most. 
The next galleass that comes in; 
that will be mine." 

"Thev say, Master, in the city," 
Guilbert broke in, "that the sea 
robbers are starting early this season. 
Word has come that they attacked 
a hippogogus, killed the horses on 
board, and butchered the crew. 
Thev are desperate, and it seems 
that one galley in particular has 
spread terror; made up of Northern- 
ers, from the barbaric frontiers." 
"Don't worry, Guilbert. Basil is 
alert. The Byzantine dromons and 
Pamphylians are waiting for them, 
to clear them out of the Big Sea, 
catch the corsairs, and hang them 
in the public square in Bvzantium. 
I saw such hangings once, and the 
Emperor himself was present. In 
any case, Guilbert, I have decided, 
and my life is with our God." 

The last farewells were said to his 
friends, and the members of the 
synagogue where the Jewish com- 
munity foregathered. Good wishes 
came to him from fellow merchants, 
from Guilbert and the aged Bene- 
dict, and the scriveners came singlv 
to wish him godspeed. 

The galleass was to sail at dawn. 
That night Immanuel the Radanite 
slept lightly. His dreams were vivid, 
filled with the whispered talk of his 
wife Zipporah. His entire life swam 
past — from the time when as a 
voung man he had come south from 
the Frankish regions to start his own 
agency; the undercurrent of regret 
that he had no son; the contacts he 
had made with men from strange 
countries, pilgrims and scholars, 
rabbis, physicians, astrologers; the 
rich, easy economy of his household 
all these years. There came to him 
too his love of fine things, jade 
pieces and odd carvings from 
Cathay, herbal lore, and the spaci- 

( Please Turn To Page 98) 



TUNE TO 



730 

WPAL 

Your 
Independent 
Radio Station 

+ + 

CHARLESTON 
SOUTH CAROLINA 



Dial 2-0687 

Charleston Tree & 
Landscape Service 

S. BECKETT, Owner 

Tree Experts 

"Let Your Tree and Garden 
Care Be Our Care" 

LANDSCAPE GARDENERS 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



The Hughes Co. \ 

Lumber and Building j 
Material 



Dial 8181 82 Mary St. 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



1 

| Dial 5505 

j Cleaners Vt 



Laundry 



I Main Office and Plant 

| 537 Meeting- Street 

! Cash and Carry Stations 

j 170 Ashley— 194 Meeting St. 

j CHARLESTON, S. C. 

i 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 

COLUMBIA, S. C. 



91 




Mrs. Theodore P. Solomon, Correspondent 



Miss Arlene Lois Levy, daughter 
i of Mr. and Mrs. Moe Levy of Co- 
lumbia, became the bride of Benja- 
min Sheppard Pearlstine, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Sam Pearlstine of St. Mat- 
thews, in a beautiful ceremony on 
the night of Tuesday, August 18, at 
the House of Peace Synagogue. 
Rabbi Morton Gordon and Rabbi 
David Karesh officiated, as the bride 
was given in marriage by her father. 
The bride was lovely in flowing 
white lace. She had as her matron 
of honor, her sister, Mrs. J. L. Bal- 
ser and her maid of honor. Miss 
June Gottlieb. Bridesmaids were 
Mrs. Harold Rittenberg, sister to 
the bride, Mrs. Herschel Cooper, 
sister to the groom, Miss Joanne Le- 
vine and Miss Cynthia Gergel. Her- 
schel Cooper was best man, and the 
ushers included Harold Rittenberg, 
Dr. Leonard Balser, Morris Ruben- 

mmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiMiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

WHERE 
YOU 
SEE 

FINE BUILDING 
YOU'LL SEE 
THIS JOB SIGN... 



FOR THIS PROJECT FURNIShIiIy 



IRON & METAL CO. 

COLUMBIA SC. PHONE 4-0301 



STRUCTURAL STEEL FOR 
BUILDINGS RNO BRIDGES 



KLINE IRON & METAL CO. 

1225-35 Huger St. Columbia. S. C. 

Phone 4-0301 

'iiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiimiiiiiii 



stein and Jack Dumas. Miss Susan 
Ilene Balser was junior bridesmaid 
and little Stepbanie Cooper was 
flower girl. Young Richard Balser 
served as ringbearer. 

Immediately following the cere- 
mony, a beautiful reception was 
held in the Columbia Hotel ball- 
room. A well-known orchestra pro- 
vided music for dancing; an elabor- 
ate buffet supper was served, and 
champagne flowed from a lit-up 
fountain of many colors. A special 
table was set for the wedding cake 
which stood three feet high and 
was outstandingly beautiful, covered 
with large, but delicate, white or- 
chids exquisitely designed of sugared 
icing. 

Ben and Arlene planned a honey- 
moon trip to Florida. 

Prior to her marriage, Arlene was 
delightfully entertained by her 
many friends. Mrs. Elsie Wolfe and 
Miss Cecile Wolfe gave a tea in her 
honor at their home; Mrs. Ben Ar- 
nold honored the bride-elect with a 
brunch at the Wade Hampton Ho- 
tel; Airs. Isadore Gergel and Mrs. 
George Gottlieb entertained with a 
luncheon at the Hotel Wade Hamp- 
ton. ... A party was given by the 
bride-elect's sisters, Mrs. J. L. Balser 
and Mrs. H. B. Rittenberg, at Mrs. 
Rittenberg' s home. Mam relatives 
and friends attended the showing of 
Arlene's trousseau at the home of 
her parents, and Mrs. J. T. Pearl- 
stine and Aliss Hannah Pearlstine 
honored Arlene with a tea at Airs. 
Pearlstine's home. Also, mam 
parties were given by relatives and 
frii;nds in St. Mathews. The re- 
hearsal party was given on the eve 
of the wedding by the bride's aunt, 
Mrs. Ethel Katz. 

Alelton Kligman of, Columbia, 
has announced the opening of his 



DeLuxe 

Gives You a Complete Laundry 
and Cleaning Service 

Cash and Carry — Also Called for and Delivered 
DIAL 2-8656 

De Luxe Laundry & Dry Cleaners 



309 State Street 



WEST COLUMBIA, S. C. 



The Following Firms in . . . 

COLUMBIA, S. C. 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 



BOYLE-VAUGHAN AGENCY 



M 
II 
II 
II 

M 

1222 Washington Street • COLUMBIA, S. C. Phone 2-2158 || 

H 



INSURANCE 
SURETY BONDS 





THE 


R. L. BRYAN CO. 


Esta I 


wished 1844 


♦ Books ♦ Gifts ♦ Cameras 




OFFICE 


AND SCHOOL SUPPLIES 


1440 


Main Street 


Phone 3 2201 






COLUMBIA, S. C. 



WALKER'S AMOCO STATION 



YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME AT 



1 PI rl PVwHr < 




THROUGHOUT SOUTH CAROLINA 



Sal 



es 



1331 Gervais St. 



For Economical Transpotration 



COLUMBIA S. C. 



s 



ervice 



, , 



CRUSHED GRANITE 
The Weston & Brooker Co, 



Plants at: 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 
CAMAK, GA. 
GRANITE HILL, GA. 



Offices: 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 
MACON, GA. 




Complete Car Care 


"The Sign of Greater Values" 


1328 Gervais St. 


COLUMBIA, S. C. Phone 9279 





CENTRAL CHEVROLET COMPANY j 



j 

Dial 3-2281 \ 



ELLIS DERRICK'S GULF FOUNTAIN 

ELLIS DERRICKS, Owner 
"Fountain of Youth for Your Car" 

GULFLEX LUBRICATION — WASHING — WAXING 

Liberal Trade-in Allowance on Tires, Batteries and Accessories 
Corner Gervais and Assembly, Columbia, S. C. Phone 9363 j 



92 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



new office for the general practice 
of law. Prior to this time, Mr. Klig- 
man was associated with the law 
firm of Edens and Woodward. He 
is a graduate of the University of 
S. C. School of Law and while at- 
tending the University of S. C. he 
won manv outstanding honors on 
the varsity debating team; and 



i 



BERRY'S 

Woman's Apparel 

1608 Main Street 



! B. BERRY'S 

! Department Store 



1416 Assembly St. 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



among other honors, was elected a 
member of Who's Who in Ameri- 
can Colleges and Universities. He is 
married to the former Miss Helenc 
Firetag, of Charleston, S. C. 

Henrv Ray Wengrow, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Sam Wengrow, of Colum- 
bia, won first place in the extempo- 
raneous speech contest during the 
A.Z.A. summer tournament held in 
Savannah, Ga., August 16 and 17, 
at the Jewish Alliance. Henry Ray 
was presented with a medal for this 
outstanding achievement during the 
final banquet on Monday night. 

Manv southern chapters attended 
this tournament which also includ- 
ed many sports events and social 
affairs. Those A.Z.A. members 
from Columbia who attended were: 
Henry Ray Wengrow, Sammv 
Freed, Maxie Rivkin, Marvin Wal- 
berg, and Stuart Ginsberg. Several 
B'nai B'rith girls from Columbia at- 
tended the dance and other social 
events. Thcv were: Misses Loretta 



= C. Jos. Niggel 



J. H. Niggel 



Geo. M. Niggel 



J. H. Morgan — 



NIGGEL BROTHERS 



Tile — Marble — Terrazzo — Resilient Flooring 



COLUMBIA, 
SOUTH CAROLINA 




3804 Devine St. 
Phone 551 I 



Say It With Flowers 
From the 

SHANDON 

GREENHOUSES 

3013 Millwood Ave. Dial 5109 

COLUMBIA, S. C. 



DREHER 

Packing Co., Inc. 

MEAT PACKERS 

COLUMBIA, S. C. 



SOUTHERN JUNK 
& PAPER CO. 

HUGO BRUCK 
PHONE 2-2764 
1334 Rosewood Drive 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



Electrical Contractors 

GREEN ELECTRIC 
COMPANY 

3425 Main St. Phone 2-4597 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



COPELAND CO. 

Incorporated 

Men's Wear 

1409 Main St. Ph. 3-1656 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



Do Your Shopping 

at 

SILVER'S 

5c, 10c and $1 Store 

COLUMBIA, S. C. 



HUGH ROBINSON CROWSON-STONE 
TILE CO. PRINTING CO. 



1415 Taylor St. Dial 9963 

COLUMBIA, S. C. 



Printers — Lithographers 

819 Mian St. Dial 3-7523 

COLUMBIA, S. C. 





HENRY RAY WENGROW 

Berry, Laurel Zalin, Carol Gray and 
Miriam Gorney. 

Bernard S. Fleisehman of Colum- 
bia, certified public accountant, has 
recently been elected a member of 
the American Institute of Account- 
ants, national professional society of 
C.P.A.'s. 

Among the new arrivals in Co- 
lumbia are: A daughter, Shcrri Jill, 
to Mr. and Mrs. Saul Lavisky on 
August 3; a daughter, Joanne to Mr. 
and Mrs. William Gottlieb on June 
27; and a daughter, Elaine Lynn to 
Mr. and Mrs. Jake Berry on July 27. 

Best wishes for a speedy recovery 
to the following Columbians who 
have been ill: Mrs. Oscar Kronrad, 
Mrs. Anna Kronrad, Mrs. P. Metz- 
ler and Mr. Aaron Kaletski, who is 
recovering from an operation. We 
are happy to hear that little Meryl 
Denise Kahn, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Bernard Kahn, has fully recov- 
ered from a broken arm. The cast 
was removed this week. 

Many visitors have come to Co- 
lumbia during August. Mrs. Dannie 
Hersh and her daughter, Nancy of 
Charleston, visited her mother, Mrs. 
Oscar Kronrad and sister, Mrs. 
Louis Coplan. Mr. and Mrs. Mar- 
tin Samuels and son, Larry, visited 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Gabe 
Stern. She is the former Irene Stern. 
Many parties were given in Irene's 
honor during her visit. Irene and 
Marty are now living in Miami, Fla. 
Rozalyn and Bertha Luberoff of 
Philadelphia, Pa., visited their sis- 
ters, Mrs. H. C. Miller and Mrs. 
John Gottlieb. Mrs. I. B. Miller is 
visiting her mother, Mrs. Ethel 
Katz. She is the former Delores 
Katz. Mr. and Mrs. Phil Widis 
(formerly Doris Schwartz, of Co- 
lumbia), of Charlotte, N. C, at- 
tended the Levy-Pearlstine wedding 
in Columbia. Mrs. Stanley Cohen 
visited her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Morris Gray this summer. Mrs. Til- 



lie Barazani and daughter, Karen, of 
Brooklyn, N. Y., spent the summer 
with her sister and brother-in-law, 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Arnold; and 
Mrs. Charles Moss of Philadelphia, 
Pa., visited her sister, Mrs. Herman 
Stein. Mrs. Rubin Rosen (former- 
ly of Columbia) enjoyed seeing 
many friends while visiting her sis- 
ter, Mrs. Saul Lavisky. Mrs. Ben 
Prager visited her brother, Dr. Leon- 
ard Balser, and Mr. and Mrs. A. 
Hirsh visited Columbia (Mrs. Hirsh 
is formerly of Columbia). She is the 
mother of Mrs. Emil Gross of this 
city. Little Janis Dickman, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Max Dickman, 
enjoyed a visit with her grandmoth- 
er, Mrs. Clara Blick in New York. 
She returned home with her two 
cousins, Linda and Ronald Goff- 
man. 

Many Columbians vacationed at 
the mountains. Among them were 
Mr. and Mrs. Sol Lourie, Mrs. M. 
B. Kahn and Mrs. Lil Reyner. Mr. 
and Mrs. Dan Daniel vacationed at 
Miami Beach. Dr. and Mrs. Albert 
Cremer and Mr. and Mrs. Meyer 
Kline vacationed in Cuba; Mrs. 
Florence Reyner and daughters, 
Robin and Wendy spent a week at 
Myrtle Beach, and Mrs. Hvman 
Rubin visited her sister in Charles- 
ton. 

Good luck to Mr. and Mrs. Sam 
Roth who recently moved into their 
new home on Sylvan Drive. Colum- 
bia welcomes the new chaplain to 
Fort Jackson. Chaplain and Mrs. 
Sholom Singer and son, Hillel are 
now residing at Myron Manor. 

The Columbia Chapter of Ha- 
dassah is planning a dance at the 
Jefferson Hotel on October 10. A 
well-known orchestra will provide 
music for dancing and an outstand- 
ing floor show will be presented un- 
der the direction of Ivan Gottlieb, 
master of ceremonies. Mrs. Ivan 
Gottlieb is entertainment chairman, 
and Mrs. Sam Roth is over-all chair- 
man of the affair which promises to 
be the social event of the season. 

The Hospitality Committee of 
the Columbia Chapter of Hadassah 
entertained with a lawn party at the 
home of Mrs. Ted Solomon, hos- 
pitality chairman, in honor of non- 
members of Hadassah. A lovely 
evening was enjoyed by all, and a 
door prize was won by Mrs. Saul 
Hurwitz. Hostesses for the evening 
were: Mrs. Lee Baker, Mrs. Melvin 
Abelove, Mrs. Albert Cremer, Mrs. 
Max Dickman, Mrs. Saul Kahn, 
Mrs. William Kronrad, Mrs. Mel- 
ton Kligman, Mrs. H. C. Miller 
Mrs. Lewis Perloff and Mrs. Jeff 
Sunshine. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



93 



The Daughters of Israel of Beth 
Sholom Synagogue and the Jewish 
Welfare Board sponsored a party for 
the Fort Jackson servicemen on 
Sunday, August 23. Mrs. Abe Zalin, 
chairman of the affair planned a 
program consisting of a skit by 
Frank Harris and Mrs. Meta Miller 
and a group of solos by Chaplain 



Sholom Singer, accompanied by 
Mrs. Ivan Gottlieb. Delicious re- 
freshments were served by members 
of the community. 

The Tree of Life Sisterhood is 
making extensive plans for the 
forthcoming bazaar to be held in 
November. Mrs. Charles Reyner is 
chairman. 



GREENVILLE, S. C. 

Mrs. Joseph Ginsburg, Correspondent 



Al Abelkop, secretary, has re- 
ceived both from the Supreme 
Lodge and from the District Lodge, 
certifiicates for his 25 year member- 
ship in the order. They were pre- 
sented to him at a special program 
during the local meeting by Presi- 
dent Nat Kaplan and Past President 
William Rosenfeld. 

Twenty-five members and their 
1 ves attended the Asheville Lodge 
Jamboree at Enka Lake on August 
10th, at which Supreme Lodge 
President Philip M. Klutznick was 
present. A delightful repast and 
program was enjoyed. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nat L. Kaplan were 
graduates of the B'nai B'rith Insti- 
tute on Judaism held at Wildacres 
during the weekend of the 8th. A 
report on the Institute was given at 
the last meeting. 

Two boys were sent to camp for a 
week each bv the lodge and the 
project of supplying shoes for the 
needy children attending public 
schools has been undertaken by the 
Lodge. 

Three wives of local members 
have become Charter Members of 
the Asheville B'nai B'rith Women's 
Chapter which was recentlv in- 
stalled. Congratulations to Mrs. Nat 



PET 

DAIRY PRODUCTS 



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R. G. PACE 
BUILDING CO. 

501 New Buncombe Road 
Phone 3-1181 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 



"Service Beyond Protection" 

The William Goldsmith 

Company 

35 West McBee Dial 2-4601 

GREENVILLE, S. C. 



Kaplan, Mrs. Al Abelkop and Mrs. 
Nathan Stotsky for their interest in 
B'nai B'rith. 

A delegation attended the South 
Carolina Association of B'nai B'rith 
Lodges Executive Meeting which 
took place on Sunday, August 23rd, 
at Hunter's Island. 

Production has started on the 
B.B.B. Revels, being produced by 
Past President Max Heller, and un- 
der the direction of "Legs" Cohen, 
which will be presented in October. 

Plans are now in process for the 
celebration of Morris M. Camp- 
bell Lodge's 20th Anniversary, 
which takes place earlv in the year. 
Federated Jewish Charities 

The annual campaign of the Fed- 
erated Jewish Charities, Inc., of 
Greenville, S. C, under the able 
leadership of President Max Shore 
is now in progress with approxi- 
mately 75 % of the quota raised, and 
which now shows a 35% increase 
over 1952. Congratulations to Max, 
and mav he keep up the good work. 
Temple Israel 

The Sisterhood of the Temple 
Israel held a reception at the Tem- 
ple in honor of Rabbi and Mrs. 
Milton Gerald Miller. The entire 
Jewish community turned out to 
welcome them to our fair citv of 
Greenville. We sincerely hope they 
will be with us for main - years to 
come. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Long are 
vacationing in Bermuda. 

Mr. Ben Meyers is at Fort Jack- 
son. He is a Lt. Colonel in the 
armv reserves. 

Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. 
Jerry Rosenberg on the birth of a 
son born Mondav, August 17th. 

The Rabbi's Dilemma 

(Concluded From Page 81) 

and Moses. Since the townspeople 
had no inkling of the behind-the- 
scene struggle, many ascribed the 
rabbi's change of heart to hypocrisy. 
Fear of an irate president, they said, 
made even a "Christian mechuten- 
este" kosher for him. But in the 
heart of one Jew — the president of 
the synagogue — there was mounting 
respect for the sober honesty of the 
rabbi. 



The Following Firms in . . . 

GREENVILLE, S. C. 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiieiiEigiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii' 

Season's Greetings 

DIXIE-HOME STORES 

Carolina's Own Chain Grocery Store 
Home Office 
GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA 
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BIHARFS RESTAURANT 

A Restaurant Name Famous in 
South Carolina for Over 30 Years 
Lewis Plaza GREENVILLE, S. C. 



j i 
i Greenville Truck & Tractor Co. ! 



GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA 



! INTERNATIONAL TRUCKS t- FARMALL TRACTORS j 
! McCORMICK-DEERING MACHINES 



322 Rhett Street 



I 

Dial 5-1051 | 



DEEN'S ESS0 

SERVICE STATION 

PARTS— ACCESSORIES 
ATLAS TIRES 
ATLAS BATTERIES 

COMPLETE ONE STOP 
STATION 

For Road Service 

Dial 3-9795 

Super Highway 
Opposite Bob Jones Univesrity 

White Oak Drive 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 



DRAUGHAN'S 

Business College 

Serving the 
Piedmont Section 
Since 1910 
DIAL 2-1642 

Paris Theatre Bldg. 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 



CAROLINA TIRE & 
RECAPPING CO. 

Custom Treading for Particular People 
91 I New Buncombe Road 
Phone 2-1932 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 



H. E. MIMS, Manager 
METROPOLITAN 
LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

South Carolina National Bank 
Building 
Phone 3-3621 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 




PEPSI-COLA BOTTLING 
COMPANY 

GREENVILLE, S. C. 



Harriet 
Hesse 

Interior Decorating 

9 West Lewis Plaza 

Phone 5-4080 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 



94 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



WESC 

The Strongest Radio Voice 
in 

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660 on Your Standard Dial 

WESC-FM 

Affiliated with 
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92.5 on Your FM Dial 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 



Greetings From 



GREENVILLE, S. C. 



You Always Save at 
Belk-Simpson Co. 

104 S. Main Dial 2-4641 

GREENVILLE, S. C. 

HALL & COX 

Insurance - Real Estate 
I 12 W. Washington 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 

Ellis Gulf Station 

and 

Ice Cream Bar 

1810 New Buncombe Rd. 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 

DRINK 

CANADA DRY 

Canada Dry Bottling Go. 

GREENVILLE, S. C. 

Byrum & Bates 

Radio & TV Headquarters 

Telephone 5-851 I 245 N. Main St. 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 



J Shop at the 

l SEARS 

5 STORE 

3 Your Shopping Center 



A JEWISH PLATFORM OF GOOD-WILL 



(Continued From Page 7) 




GREENVILLE, S. C. 



■.WAWiWiW.VAVAWi 1 



Prescription Specialists 

BRUCE & DOSTER 
COMPANY 

Your REXALL Dealer 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 

21 Years of Experience 

P. R. LONG CO. 

Rental — Real Estate 

108 West Washington Street 
Phone 2-7391 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 

Need a Plumber? 
Dial 2-5012 

SAM F. FLOYD 

6 Duncan Street 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 

Fire -Automobile INSURANCE 

WHITE 

GENERAL INSURANCE 
AGENCY, Inc. 

Morgan Building Phone 2-2703 

GREENVILLE, S. C. 

Attaway-Easterling 
Pontiac, Inc. 

Sales Ponfiac Service 

Phone 2-1808 Phone 2-1809 

40 Rutherford Street 

GREENVILLE, S. C. 



Robinson's 

17 No. Main Street 
GREENVILLE, S. C. 



Judaism's God of love, revealed 
by Amos, by Hosea, by Jonah, by 
Malachi, could not have command- 
ed of His people, (His people only 
in the sense that they had dedicated 
themselves unto Hun and conse- 
crated themselves and their children 
and children's children to become 
His everlasting servants) such a uni- 
versal and loving Father of all man- 
kind could not, by the farthest 
stretch of the imagination, have is- 
sued any commandment which 
openly declared "Thou shalt love 
thy neighbor as thyself," but which 
subtly implied that that term, 
"neighbor," was to include only 
"thy fellow Jew." Those who argue 
thus have failed to read on in the 
selfsame Nineteenth Chapter of the 
Book of Leviticus even as far as the 
thirty-fourth verse where, as though 
anticipating the detractors of the 
future, the ancient teachers of Israel 
took great pains to specify, "but the 
STRANGER that dwelleth among 
you shall be unto you as the home- 
born, and thou shalt love him as 
thyself; for yc were strangers in the 
land of Egypt." Now, what kind of 
strangers were the Hebrews in the 
land of Egypt concerning which 
they were reminded, as a sign and 
token of the manner in which they 
were to treat the strangers, the non- 
Israelite, the non-Jew? They were 
in Egypt the helots, the pariahs, 
the lowliest and most degraded of 
serfs. And this, their earliest origin, 
they were bidden never to forget in 
order that they might love the 
humblest of their neighbors, the so- 
journers in their midst, as them- 
selves. 

Again, in the selfsame chapter in 
verse seventeen we read: "Thou 
shalt not hate thy brother, even in 
thy heart"; while in verse eighteen, 
even more specifically we are en- 
joined: "Thou shalt not AVENGE, 
nor BEAR ANY GRUDGE — but 
thou shalt love thy neighbor as thy- 
self." 

More specific still is the counsel 
of the Book of Proverbs which ap- 
plies this transcendent ideal to the 
actual deeds of daily life when it 
admonishes: "If thine enemy be 



hungry, give him bread to eat; and 
if he be thirsty, give him water to 
drink." The later writers of the Tal- 
mud went yet farther in their appli- 
cation of this lofty principle by em- 
phatically stating that "even if thine 
enemy rise up early in the morning 
and come to thy door to slay thee; if 
he be hungry give him bread to eat; 
and if he be thirsty, give him water 
to drink." And whereas there may 
be those who dismiss these sublime 
utterances as mere vague theorizing 
on the part of the sages and rabbis, 
we need but to turn to the Book of 
Exodus or the Book of Deuterono- 
my where we find inscribed into the 
actual law code which every faithful 
Jew was enjoined scrupulously to 
obey, such statutes as these: "If 
thou seest the ass of him that hateth 
thee lying under his burden, and 
thou woudst forbear to help him, 
thou shalt, nonetheless, surely help 
him." (Exodus 23:4-5) Underly- 
ing all principle and practice in 
Israel was the inescapable convic- 
tion that "vengeance is the Lord's 
alone" (Deuteronomy 32:35) and 
that, as for man, he must love and 
serve his fellow creatures, all of 
whom are made in the image of 
God: he must serve and love even 
the foe who seeketh his destruction. 

This is Jewish teaching, Jewish 
teaching which nowhere in the en- 
tire Torah or Talmud or later phlo- 
sophic writers or rabbinic masters is 
repudiated or even challenged by 
any authoritative voice in Israel. 
Passage after passage of a similar 
nature might be quoted from the 
Jewish teachers of every century 
through which the Jew struggled, 
from every country whither his peo- 
ple wandered, wherein, despite 
every provocation for the Jew to 
preach hatred and yet more hatred, 
vengeance and yet more vengeance, 
he persists in proclaiming again and 
yet again that "hatred is tantamount 
to bloodshed" (The Talmud). This 
divine doctrine of love, yea even 
love of his enemies, was crystallized 
by the sage Hillel many years be- 
fore the Nazarene in his concise an- 
swer to the Roman who challenged 
him to rehearse the whole of Juda- 



5 Metal of All Types — All Light Gauge Scrap 

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£ New Buncombe Road GREENVILLE, S. C. Dial 2-7356 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



95 



ism while he stood on one foot: 
"What is hateful unto thee, do not 
unto thy fellow. That is the whole 
of the commandment." replied Hil- 
lel, "All the rest is commentary." 
And lest again petty detractors sug- 
gest that Hillel had in mind only 
his fellow-Jews, he later amplified 
this first historic proclamation of 
the Golden Rule by more explicitly 
asserting: "Be of the disciples of 
Aaron: loving peace and pursuing 
peace, and loving all thy fellow 
creatures," using the generic term 
"Kol Ha Beriyoth," meaning all 
created beings. 

What the early rabbis taught con- 
cerning the love which the Jew is 
commanded to bestow upon his fel- 
lowman, upon even his enemy, up- 
on criminals likewise (whose pun- 
ishment was ever to be softened by 
the gentle quality of mercy), yea, 
upon the beast of the field as well 
•for which the Sabbath was, par- 
tially at least, ordained; what these 
early rabbis taught, their later dis- 
ciples deepened and enriched. Thus 
Maimonides continuously expressed 
the profoundest admiration for the 
teachings of both Christianity and 
Mohammedanism, which was all 
the more remarkable in the intoler- 
ant medieval world in which he 
lived, a world in which there raged 
the bitterest religious barbarities and 

Season's Greetings 
from 

RUBEN'S 

Department Store 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 

McAULIFFE 

REALTY COMPANY 

Real Estate — Insurance 
Renting — Surety Bonds 
807 Broad St. Phone 2-6086 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



feuds, a world which had scarcely 
emerged from the deep black of the 
dark ages, when heretics were 
hunted down like dogs, and when 
Jews were spitted like swine. He 
counselled his fellow-Jews not to 
mock at the seeming superstitions 
of their neighbors, even the peculiar 
stone-throwings and strange genu- 
flections of the worshippers of Mec- 
ca, for while in origin these customs 
may have been pagan and supersti- 
tious, Maimonides generously ar- 
gued that new and rational mean- 
ings had been woven into them by 
their present followers. Witness 
this remarkable twelfth - century 
statement by Maimonides: "The 
teachings of him of Nazareth 
(Jesus) and of the man of Ismael 
(Mohammed) who rose after him, 




Sprucing up for the holidays is a pleas* 
ant chore for these young villagers at 
the Mizrachi Women's Children's Vil* 
lage and Farm School in Raanana, 
Israel. The Children's Village is one of 
49 projects sponsored by Mizrachi 
Women's Organization of America, an 
official agency of Youth Aliyah. 



Season's Greetings from 

KING HARRY'S 

MUSIC SERVICE 

HARRY SIMOWITZ, Prop. 
1924 Battle Row Phone 6-6140 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



The Following Firms in . . . 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 



Season's Greetings from 

WGAC 

BROADCASTING STATION 

58 ON YOUR DIAL — ABC NETWORK 

Listen to RABBI GOLDBURG Every Sunday Evening 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



Best Wishes for the Holiday Season 

FINE PRODUCTS CORP. 

827 Telfair 
CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



GUY C. SMITH — General Contractor 

BUILDING 28 YEARS IN AUGUSTA 
COMMERCIAL — RESIDENTIAL — ALTERATIONS 
Estimates Freely Given 



1355 Greene St. 



Phone 2-7329 



AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



Flowers of Distinction 

BUSH'S FLORIST 

III Pine Grove Ave. W. Downtown Shop 1006 Broad 

Dial 5-7585 Dial 2-4826 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



BELMONT RESTAURANT 

Specializing in 

SEAFOOD AND WESTERN STEAKS 
We Never Close 



716 S. Broad 



Phone 2-6796 



AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



B and B Lumber and Supply Company 

LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIALS 



Yard and Office — I 



245 D'Antignac 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



Phone 2-6639 « 




AUGUSTA MONUMENT COMPANY 



JULE W. EAVENSON 
GRANITE — MARBLE MONUMENTS 
2064 Walton Way 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



MARKERS 
Dial 6-2595 



...... ....... ....... ....... .........^ .. .... . . ..... 

B and W CAFETERIA 

"AUGUSTA'S NEWEST" 

Good Food — Courteous Service • Meet Your Friends Here 

305 8th St. Dial 4-1318 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



Season's Greetings 




CANDIES 



AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



96 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



The Following Firms in . . . 

CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 

. . . Extend Sincere Holiday Greetings 



Season's Greetings from 

ZEIGE'S BAKERY 

Unexcelled in 

QUALITY BAKED GOODS 

Tasty — Wholesome 
2338 McCallie Ave. CHATTANOOGA, TENN. Dial 4-1931 



CAROLYN CHENILLES, Inc. 

Manufacturers of 
BEAUTIFUL CHENILLE BEDSPREADS 



Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Dalton, Georgia 



Sweetwater, Tenn. 
New York, N. Y. 



Office and Show Room 
358 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, N. Y. 



921 E. Ninth St. 



Dial 6-3693 



CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



SALES JSS^EPS^' SERVICE 
1700 Broad St. 



CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



Season's Greetings from 

BROWN BROS. — Contractors 

1701 Central Ave. Phone 7-6642 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 

Season's Greetings from 

BUILDERS SUPPLY COMPANY 



Season's Greetings 

HAILEY CHEVROLET CO. 



Dial 7-4416 



nilllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll' 

Season's Greetings 

STERCHI and SONS DAIRY 

UNEXCELLED DAIRY PRODUCTS 

Highway 58 East Phone 2-7894 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



help to bring to perfection all man- 
kind, so that they may all serve God 
with one consent." 

But it is not merely out of an- 
cient, nor even Medieval, writ that 
such an unequivocal mandate to 
Brotherhood obtains! In the recent- 
lv adopted preamble to the Charter 
of the Joint Commission on Social 
Action of the Union of American 
Hebrew Congregations and the 
Central Conference of American 
.Rabbis this age-old tradition of the 
Jew is clearly echoed: 

"Wc are the heirs of the great 
Jewish tradition which conceives of 
its ultimate goal as the establish- 
ment of the Kingdom of Heaven on 
earth. The God Whom we serve is 
a God of righteousness Who would 
have us be holy as He is holy. The 
Torah which we cherish is a guide 
for spiritual living concerned with 
every aspect of human experience. 
The prophets of Israel, dedicated to 
God and the welfare of their fellow- 
men, bid us pursue Justice, seek 
peace, and attain brotherhood with 
everyone of God's creatures, what- 
ever their race, creed, or class." 

More recent still, virtually as re- 
cent as the latest headline or radio 
newsflash, is the declaration of the 
Commission of Justice and Peace 
of the Central Conference of Amer- 
ican Rabbis issued by America's Re- 
form rabbis for Race Relations Sab- 
bath in February, 1953: 

JUSTICE, JUSTICE SHALT 

THOU PURSUE 
The extent of a nation's respect 
for the dignity and rights of all its 
citizens is the full measure of its 
contribution to human progress. 
This concern for the dignity and 
rights of our citizens is embodied 
in the Bill of Rights which in turn 
finds divine sanction in the pro- 
phetic mandate, "Justice, justice 
shalt thou pursue." 

And etched in imperishable stone 
on the imposing facade of the 
House of Living Judaism of the 
Union of American Hebrew Con- 
gregations, which stands so majes- 
tically as the spiritual Home of 
American Jews and Jewesses at the 
crossroads of America on Fifth Ave- 
nue at Sixty-fifth Street in New 
York City, is once again that divine 
summons to the very quintessence 



of man's humanity to man: "Love 
thy neighbor as thyself." 

Not out of sheer expediency, 
then, but as the concrete implemen- 
tation of the loftiest teachings of 
Judaism, Jews should find in such 
adventures in human brotherhood 
as the National Conference of 
Christians and Jews a tangible and 
gratifying medium for their noblest 
ideals. Founded exclusively to "pro- 
mote justice, amity, and under- 
ing among Protestants, Catholics, 
and Jews," it offers a platform and 
a program upon which Christians 
and Jews, Americans all, can stand 
hand-in-hand, shoulder-to-shoulder, 
and heart-to-heart, and march for- 
ward toward the Kingdom of God 
on earth. 

For though it be true that we of 
the House of Israel are united by 
bonds that are deeper than blood, 
by a common history, by common 
sufferings, by common beliefs and 
aspirations which quite naturally 
cause us to feel ourselves as mem- 
bers of a single family, such senti- 
ments need not, and according to 
all that is best and noblest in our 
faith, must not preclude us from 
having similar sentiments and at- 
tachments of fellowship and broth- 
erly love toward those of other 
faiths. For even as the familial love 
which one may feel toward his dear 

MARY ANN 
BAKE SHOP 

Specializing in 
Wedding — Birthday — Party 

CAKES 
3478 Brainerd Rd. Dial 4-7641 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 




407 Market 



REECE CAFE 

"Home of Good Food" 
Air Conditioned 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



i 

924 Market j 

i 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



^7 




DEDICATE HUMAN RELATIONS PROJECT AT ATLANTA PUBLIC 
LIBRARY — Reading from left to right — Rev. Harrison McMains, Dr. Alfred 
Weinstein, Ga. ADL Chairman, Chief Librarian John Settlemeyer and Atlanta 
ADL Director Arthur J. Levin. 



ones in the flesh need not prevent 
him from also loving his fellow- 
creatures who are not of his kith 
and kin, so does our loyalty to Israel 
in no wise bar the wav to our devo 



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tion to our non-Jewish neighbors. 
For so long as we are Jews — genuine 
and real Jews — and not mere racists 
born of Jewish blood, we have one 
fundamental faith from which we 
dare not depart: The faith in a 
universal Father Who has made all 
men in I lis divine image and 
against Whom we grievously sin if 
we should harm or hate any of His 
treasured creatures. As Jews it is 
our most sacred religious duty, 
therefore, to live up to the loftiest 
commandment of our faith: "Thou 
shalt love thy neighbor as thyself,"' 
especially as it has been interpreted 
by one of Israel's greatest masters 
when he enjoined us "not to do 
unto others what we would not 
wish others to do unto us." This 
we declare with Hillel is the whole 
of our religion: "7a\ hi kol ha Torah 
kuloh." This is, indeed, the whole 
of our faith. All the rest is but 
commentary. For, with our sages of 
old we too affirm: "Olom Chesed 
Hiboneh," "the world is founded 
upon Love alone." Verily:: 
He prayeth best who loveth best 

All things, both great and small; 
For the good God who loveth us 

He made and loveth all. 

RAULSTON PLUMBING 
and HEATING CO. 

PLUMBING and HEATING 
Supplies — Service — Installation 
822 McCallie Ave. Phone 7-3843 
CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



J. AVERY BRYAN CO., Inc. 

Funeral Directors — Ambulance Service 

747 McCallie Ave. Phone 6-2131 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



Happy New Year 

WDEF 

BROADCASTING STATION 

CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



T T ▼ T T" ▼ 



T T T T T - 



T T ▼ T T T 



T" T " T T T 'T' T TTTTTTTTT 1 



Season's Greetings From 

SUCCESS PORTRAIT COMPANY 



1301 McCallie Ave. CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



Phone 2-7721 « 



OLD PHOTOS and PORTRAITS RECOPIED 
MINIATURES — OIL PORTRAITS — FRAMES 



QUINN MANUFACTURING CO. 

Beauty Craft Steel Cabinets — Custom Built Wood Cabinets 
Formica Tops — Complete Kitchen Planning — Free Estimate 

38th and Dodds Ave. Phone 4-1531 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



STRICKLAND PATTERN WORKS 



ESTABLISHED 1904 



Dye House Equipmpnt 

Paddle Type Dye Machines, 
Monel Scoops, Dippers, 
Buckets and Stirring Rods 



Pressure Cast Match Plates 

Wood and Metal Patterns 
Aluminum, Brass and 
Bronze Castings 



Phone 7-2636 



CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



A Happy New Year from 

PARAMOUNT CLEANERS 



251 I East Main St. 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



Phone 2-1 129 



MORNINGSIDE CHEMICAL CO., Inc. 

Textile Chemicals and Softeners Dyestuffs and Mornitex Products 

2205 Holtzclaw Ave. Phone 2-22702 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



EAST BRAINERD 
LUMBER and SUPPLY CO. 



6001 Lee Highway 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



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Local and Long Distance Hauling Agents for Allied Van Lines 

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98 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



SEASON S GREETINGS 



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ADVERTISING INDEX 



American Oil Co. 



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B 



Branch Banking & Trust Co 6 

Bryant Supply Co 6 

Buckingham Valley Slate Corp. 11 

Burkyams 17 

Burrus Land & Lumber Co. .- inside front cover 



C & P Telephone Co. ... 10 

Candlewick Yarn Co. 3 

Coca-Cola Bottlers back cover 

Colonial Stores 12 

D 

Dixie Loom Reed Co., Inc 98 

Dr. Pepper Bottling Co inside back cover 

G 

Gills Coll'ee inside front cover 

H 

Home Brewing Co. ,j - inside back cover 

K 

Kingan & Co 4 



M 

Mason Dixon Lines 6 

Mayfair Chenilles 81 

Moss Trucking Co 3 

N 

\ehi Bottling Co inside back cover 



Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. inside back cover 

Public Service Co 6 

R 

Reliable Furniture Co. inside front cover 



Sellars Manufacturing Co. 81 

Sicelofi Manufacturing Co 17 

Smith Transfer Co 4 

Southern Asbestos Co 17 

Sparks, Inc 81 

Superior Construction Co. 17 

Super Tufter Machinery Co 3 



W Page 

Wilson Trucking Co 4J 

Wyatt Cornick, Inc inside front cover 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Burlington 75-77 

Charlotte 61-67 

Durham 82-84 

Fayetteville 72-73 

Gastonia 73 

Graham 75-77' 

Hickory 80-81 

High Point 44J 

Raleigh 82-84 

Statesville 80-81 

Wilmington 68-71 

Winston-Salem 78-79 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston 85-90 

Columbia 91-92 

Greenville 93-94 

VIRGINIA 

Charlottesville : 38-39 

Danville 4fl 

Fredericksburg 38-39 

Lynchburg 36-37 

Martinsville 42-43 

Newport News 33 

Norfolk 30-32 

Portsmouth 33 

Richmond 12-28 

Roanoke .. .34-35 

Stanleytown 42-43 

Staunton 4ffl 

Waynesboro 40( 

GEORGIA 

Augusta 95 

TENNESSEE 
Chattanooga 96-98 



JUDAEN DESTINY 

(Concluded From Page 90) 



ous ceremonials in his home during 
the sacred days. 

His home. He awoke with a 
start. Home echoed and throbbed 
in his memory, so sharply etched 
had been his dream pictures. 

He prayed, and had a simple meal 
served by Ali the Nubian. Then 
he made his way to the waterfront. 
The towering galleass, with its tur- 
rets and watchtower and its swelling 
sails, the clamor of seamen and 
travelers boarding the ship, the 
mingling of Latin and Frankish 
idioms and Hebrew all created in 
Immanuel a queer turbulent feeling. 
He stood observing the ship. For 
an instant it appeared to him im- 
mobile, unreal, like a gaily painted 
design on a fresco. 



He would board it immediately 
and he would become part of it, 
severed from land, tossed on the ele- 
ments. The Holy Land seemed 
for the moment remote. The only 
real thing was this painted galleass. 

A strange feeling assailed the 
Radanite, as if he were shedding 
an old worn mantle, leaving him 
stripped of physical things. 

A trumpet blast whorled and 
quavered in the early air. Slowly, 
the galleass lurched and grunted and 
heaved. It rose swinging on the 
waters. It turned its back to shore 
and swayed out into the horizon. 

On deck, Immanuel the Rada- 
nite looked seaward. He felt a new 
lightness, a new buovancy. He was 
bound for home. 



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THE 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY OF VIRGINIA 




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FOR 

GOVERNOR OF VIRGINIA 





A. E. S. Stephens J. Lindsay Almond, Jr. 

FOR FOR 
Lt. Governor Attorney General 

Why sacrifice experience for experiment? 

ELECTION 

Tuesday, November 3, 7953 



"We are strong advocates of the fiscal policies of your Com- 
monwealth which have brought good, safe and sound government 
to Virginia. Those policies include a balanced budget; economi- 
cal, efficient and conscientious administration, and freedom from 
State indebtedness. Our program to advance the Virginia 
economy can be accomplished without any increase in taxation." 



/7 w Times -Outloo 

Volume XIX • NOVEMBER, 1953 (/ Number 3 ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ^0 ^0 ^0 WfM m ■ ^0 



EDITORIALS 



Chester A. Brown. Editor 



The Future of B'nai B'rittis Institutes of Judaism 

The decision of the Supreme Grand Lodge of B'nai B'rith, 
at the recent Asheville session of its Executive Committee, to 
make the Institute of Judaism one of its major projects is 
indeed a welcome one to those of us who regard the Institute 
idea and all that it stands for, as one of the most promising 
movements in world Jewry today. We say world Jewry, 
because the Institute program is no longer confined merely 
to this country. The Institute held this past summer in 
Strasbourg, France is but the fore-runner of an international 
series which will expand together with the program in this 
country, next year. 

With the establishment of the Intitute program as a pro- 
fessionally directed national project, the idea will emerge 
from its embryo stage. A director, when chosen, will find 
much to do. Six years of more or less experimentation have 
established a modus operandi that may well serve as a 
starting point but there are many improvements that will 
be made now that the effort is organized. With Maurice A. 
Weinstein, President of the Fifth District Grand Lodge as 
National Institute Chairman, progress is assured. We, as 
one of the pioneers with Mr. Weinstein in the establishment 
of the first Institute, held under the auspices of the North 
Carolina B'nai B'rith Association at Wildacres in the sum- 
mer of 1948, know that he is aware of the points at which 
the program can be strengthened. 

There are two main elements upon which the Institutes 
depend for their success. These are the selection of themes, 
and the ability to secure the faculty personnel that can ade- 
quately interpret the themes. So far, the men who have 
manned the faculties are outstanding in the fields of Jewish 
culture and education. The roster is replete with names 
that are among the brightest stars in the Jewish firmament. 
This same strength is not so noticeable on the score of 
themes. To us, it would seem as if in many instances we 
have been saying pretty much the same things in different 
words. To our way of thinking this is the one phase of the 
Institute program that will require the first meeting of pro- 
fessional and lay minds in the new set-up. 

Philip M. Klutznick, National B'nai B'rith president, 
outlined another important use to which the Institute pro- 
gram will be put, when he spoke at Temple Emanuel, 
Greensboro, on the night of October 5th. Mr. Klutznick's 
appearance there climaxed a remarkable day for the members 
of the Jewish communities of Greensboro, and the adjacent 
towns that participated. To the best of our knowledge and 
belief, the new president is the first of the national heads to 
visit communities in which there are B'nai B'rith lodges 
since the time the then president, B'nai B'rith's "grand old 
man" sainted memory, Alfred M. Cohen, visited Charlotte, 
back in the 1930's. His coming to Greensboro was part of a 
well-conceived plan under which he is touring the country 
to find out at first hand what the people are thinking about 
in terms of B'nai B'rith, and on Jewish problems in general. 
He reasons, and quite logically we believe, that this is an 
important prelude to making his plans for strengthening the 
Order. 



Mr. Klutznick introduced a welcome innovation, in that 
at none of the sessions held during the day, did he make a 
speech. Everything was on a question and answer basis. 
The questions came from the audiences. He gave the an- 
swers. And he gave them in no uncertain tones. He never 
once ducked an issue — and there were many highly explosive 
points that were raised from the floor. His answers convinced 
everyone who heard them, of his complete mastery of his 
subject, and his amazing facility in finding the right answer 
on the spur of the moment. 

In answering the quite general problem of the smaller 
lodges in finding a means of holding the interest of members 
at meetings, Mr. Klutznick announced that it would be part 
of the new Institute department to proved audio-visual pro- 
gram material taken from the various Institutes. He pointed 
out with characteristic frankness, that this phase of co- 
operation would take time to develope, but it is at least 
heartening to know that help in programming is forthcom- 
ing. 

We look forward with great enthusiasm to the further 
development of the Institute as the most promising answer 
to the many problems that beset us as Jews. May it grow 
from strength to strength. 

The New Year and the Problem of Jerusalem 

One of the knottiest problems with which the State of 
Israel has to contend as it enters the New Year is that of 
convincing the remainder of the world that its concept of 
Jerusalem as the country's capitol should be accepted. 

The removal of most of the ministers, together with 
other official offices, to the Holy City has already been 
effected. The move drew from the United States the state- 
ment that it looked with disfavor on the action, and stated 
unequivocally, that it had no intention of moving its min- 
istry from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. It was made clearly evi- 
dent from the remarks that accompanied our country's ulti- 
matum that this government is firm in its insistence that the 
status of Jerusalem be retained as an open city. 

Moshe Sharett, Minister of Foreign Affairs for the State 
of Israel, in a speech made in the Knesseth on June 15th of 
this year, gave detailed explanation of why it is so vital to 
his people to have Jerusalem as Israel's capitol. He likewise 
gave assurance that the Holy Places in the Old City, sacred 
to the Christians, would remain inviolate. "The Govern- 
ment of Israel has proclaimed that it assumed full responsi- 
bility for the safety and inviolability of these Holy Places, 
for the assurance of free access to them under suitable secu- 
rity conditions and for the provision of full facilities of free 
and unhampered worship," the Minister said. This of 
course, has been at the bottom of the insistence that Jeru- 
salem be considered a corpus Separatum, over which neither 
Jordan or Israel would have control. 

The State of Israel is firm in its belief that it is in the 
right in this issue. It remains to be seen whether other 
countries can be persuaded. It will take considerable diplo- 
matic "working out", in our opinion, to flout so friendly 
a country as the United States, without ultimately affecting 
the good will that is so important to the new State. 



The American Jewish Times-Outlook, published monthly at 726 Southeastern Building. Greensboro, N. C. Richmond Office, Broad-Grace Arcade, Richmond. Va. Ches 
n ™V °n n V Ldlt ° r ; David Bernstein, General Manager; Nathan Kessler, Advertising and Business Manager, Richmond Office; Florence Byers, Virginia News Editor, P. O. 
?\ t> oi? ' X a ' ; Box 1494 ' Greensboro > N. C. Member Seven Arts Feature Syndicate, Inc. $2.00 per year payable in advance. Entered as Second-Class Matter 

at the 1 ost Office at Greensboro, N. C, under Act of March 3, 1879. The views expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the publishers, but mav be published in 
the interest of freedom of the press. The American Jewish Times-Outlook is owned and edited solelv as an independent enterprise and is not a Jewish communitv undertaking. 



4 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




Manewitz Leaves The Stage 



LOUIS LIPSKY 

They thought of Death — if at all 
— as a far-off station on a long road. 
Life was a game, and when Death 
toppled over one of them and he 
failed to rise, they gave vent to their 
grief in loud lamentation and show. 
Their mourning was the ritual of a 
primitive people. Mourning over, 
they went hack to their play re- 
freshed 

But when Manewitz died it was 
like a convulsion of nature. What 
a mighty stroke of the Angel of 
Death to lay low that giant! He 
was a symbol of strength and aggres- 
sion. Mighty stars and managers 
stood in awe of him. There was no 
one brave enough to tamper with 
his manuscripts. He spoke arro- 
gantly. He disregarded convention 
and refused to knuckle under for ad- 
vantage. And now, there he lay, 
stiffened out. staring at the ceiling. 

The Yiddish Rialto was over- 
whelmed. It was felt that there 
must be a dramatic exhibition of 
grief worthy of the tragedy. If not 
now, when? A black letter day in 
the annals of the theatre — the day 
of Manewitz's funeral. Let the 
orchestras play soft music — find the 
funeral marches and play them with 
vigor; the cellos should wail and 
groan; the violins should play with 
muted strings; let the trombones 
blare. The stage should be set in 
black. Put a few gigantic urns near 
the footlights on either side.' Drape 
mourning bands from the top gal- 
lery down to the orchestra. Hang 
his enlarged portrait in the center of 
the proscenium, and lower it for all 
to see. When such a great man dies, 
art should provide a performance 
that fits the occasion. 

Let Winchefsky, the grandfather 
of Yiddish literature in America, 
write a series of articles describing 
the last painful hours of the de- 
ceased (which he did after he re- 



By LOUIS LIPSKY 



turned from his vacation in the Cat- 
skills, much improved by the moun- 
tain air.) Don't turn Baranof away; 
let him also write of his friendship 
with Manewitz; who had persuaded 
him — Baranof, related in appearance 
to Beethoven ■ — to compose his 
twenty-first symphony. That sym- 
phony rests in manuscript, unpub- 
lished for lack of funds, but when it 
is finallv published it will be dedi- 
cated to the memory of the great 
Manewitz. Joel Antin is entitled to 
the floor. That erudite journalist 
began a series of articles that con- 
tinued until the first anniversary of 
Manewitz's death. They were arti- 
cles that exhausted the entire sub- 
ject and, in conclusion, Antin prom- 
ised that there was yet a book to be 
written. That promise as yet to be 
fulfilled. The resplendent Ritter 
cannot be denied the right to his 
word; he calls his secretary and dic- 
tates an article of reminiscences 
about Manewitz; of course, the sec- 
retary will fill in the details; you 
may be sure he will write the article 
to Ritter's satisfaction; and you may 
also be sure that he will avoid all 
references to the contracts broken 
by Ritter, to the royalties not paid 
by Ritter. 

What Manewitz had given to the 
Yiddish theatre was the burden of 
this outpouring of mourning. He 
had written a large number of plays 
— about forty in all. Many of them 
were not original. He had taken 
suggestions from the dramas of all 
theatres. He had rewritten operettas 
and farces, and adapted well-known 
plavs by giving them a Jewish slant. 
He had paraphrased, in a Jewish set- 
ting, the best of Hauptman's tragic 
plays, and he had transplanted doz- 
ens of the works of leading Russian 
dramatists. There was integrity in 
his workmanship. His dialogue was 
sensible and interesting. His wit 



(Copyright by David Lipsky 1953) 



was not of the theatre, but in char- 
acter drawing. It was said that he 
wrote plays to order. So did Shake- 
speare. So did every dramatist who 
made the writing of plays a profes- 
sion. And writing plays became 
Manewitz's profession. In short, he 
was the ablest man of letters the 
Yiddish theatre had acquired. The 
repertoire of all acting companies 
existed because of Manewitz's work. 
Thev were the foundation of Ma- 
dame Lubella's career — in Mirele 
Efros, the reverse of the Jewish King 
in Die Schecita, which was based 
on a sketch by Perez; in Rosa 
Brandt, Hauptman's play; in The 
Bastard, adapted from Victor Hugo. 
Burlak would have been a wind-bag 
of an actor if he had not played in 
Manewitz's The Charlattan, the 
Kreutzer Sonata, and together with 
Madame Lubella in all of her plays. 
Ritter never would have achieved 
the position he occupied in the thea- 
tre had it not been for Manewitz's 
Jewish King Lear, a paraphrase of 
Shakespeare's play, for his Der 
Fremder, for his Elisha Ben Abrya 
and Der Maturef. Nor did he write 
plays only for the stars. They were 
all good ensemble plays. In them 
every actor in the company was 
given an opportunity. The charac- 
ter distinguished himself, the villain 
and the comedian. He had a kind 
heart also for the common people of 
the union, and seldom wrote a play 
in which there was not place for the 
chorus men and the chorus women, 
and he had no objection, later on, if 
a song were introduced and the 
orchestra could be employed. He 
felt that the entire theatre had to 
be fed, and he was the mother feed- 
ing them with good parts and with 
opportunities for service. This was 
the gist of what they wrote about 
him in the press and at memorial 
meetings, and every scribbler who 



ever said "hello" to Manewitz in a 
coffee-house took pen in hand and 
wrote personal reminiscences and 
anecdotes to his heart's content. 
Their eulogies oozed with praise, for 
they believed that of the dead noth- 
ing but good should be spoken. 

The actor's union gave form to its 
sentiments in long resolutions. 
Black bands were ordered worn on 
the sleeve of every member. The 
vulgar operettas were laid aside, and 
there was a cycle of- "serious" plays, 
and "Broken Hearts" was revived, 
which added to the flood of tears. 

There was no mistaking the fact 
that the Yiddish theatre was in 
mourning. Manewitz's death ended 
a chapter. He had written his last 
play. The curtain had fallen on the 
last act of the last play-. A new 
chapter in the history of the theatre 
would have to be written. Who 
were to act in the plays that would 
be registered in that chapter? Until 
a reply was forthcoming, let mourn- 
ing have full swing. 

The grief of one man was unno- 
ticed. He was a silent mourner. 
They called him Kemat. He was a 
stout little fellow with a nose like a 
ferret's. He pretended not to know 
what was going on in the world ex- 
cept what related to Manewitz. 
That was his work. He was the 
guardian of Manewitz's plays. He 
knew the quality of his genius and 
was its slave. He was in quick suc- 
cession a peddler, a scene-shifter, an 
usher and then, brushing up against 
Manewitz at a rehearsal, he was 
transfixed by an apparition and had 
his ears pierced for life. He had his 
ears pierced as the' slave of Mane- 
witz's plays. When Manewitz 
wanted to know anything about his 
properties, so to speak — who would 
play what, what they owed him, 
what was going on in the theatre, 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



how many actors were used in this 
or that play — he sent for Kemat. 

He first acquired the habit of 
using Kemat for errands. Then he 
proposed having him sleep in the 
house. It was a sweeping gesture of 
hospitality. "Let room be found for 
Kemat." There were seven children 
and six rooms. "Give him a place 
in the garret," he said to his wife, 
a woman with mournful eyes. 
"Treat him like one of the family," 
he added, sternlv. She vanished in- 
to the kitchen. All right to argue 
with the grocer or butcher, but not 
with the tyrant whom fate had as- 
signed as her provider. 

"Mr. Manewitz," said Kemat one 
day, "it's shameful how they cheat 
you." 

"They are rogues," said Manewitz. 

"But what robbers," said Kemat. 
"They falsify their books. They pay 
three times and play for one. They 
should be watched." 

"Then why don't you watch 
them?" said Manewitz. 

Kemat thus became the collector 
of his royalties. Not being a book- 
keeper, he kept the accounts in his 
head. He watched the posters, the 
advertisements in the press, and 
prowled around the theatres. He 
was there with his reckoning on pay 
day, and would not go away unsatis- 
fied, even when he had to follow 
the manager home. He knew all of 
Manewitz's plays — how many times 
they had been plaved, the intake of 
each play in terms of royalties, how 
many characters in each, what stage 
business had been invented without 
Manewitz's authority, and who were 
the saboteurs of Manewitz. 

At the height of his success, his 
body had filled out. His bank ac- 
count had become respectable. He 
owned a house in Brooklyn. Mane- 
witz complained of illness and had 
a doctor visit him. A ripple of 
anxiety spread through all the cof- 
fee-houses frequented by the acting 
fraternity. X-rays were taken, medi- 
cine prescribed. Manewitz was or- 
dered to bed. He refused to remain 
for long, dressed himself and went 
about the streets as usual. When 
the pain returned, he sent for an- 
other doctor, and it was discovered 
that it was a serious matter. There 
were ulcers in his stomach. Then 
there were ominous whispers that it 
might be cancer. A shudder rippled 
through the coffee-houses. Mane- 
witz felt the wings of the Angel of 
Death brush his cheek. And when 
they covered him that night, he 
looked at those who were nursing 
him with a strange interest. Then 
they had to give him morphine to 
dull the pain. It confused his 



thoughts and deranged his vision. 
When he was bundled to bed and 
saw his trousers on a hanger, he 
thought, sadly. Would ever his bod} 
fill them again? He lingered for 
months on a sick bed. He looked 
like an ox whose vitals were being 
gnawed at by a monster. He hadn't 
the strength to throw him off. He 
felt it was useless to fight, it was 
useless to think. So he turned his 
face to the wall, he closed his eyes, 
he stretched out and felt relieved 
when he died. 

Kemat witnessed the tragedy. He 
walked about the streets, into the 
home, made inquiries and went 
away. His eyes were red, and he did 
not eat for dav and davs. When 
they mentioned cancer, he was 
thrown into great excitement. 

"Don't tell mc he has cancer," he 
shouted. Even when Manewitz's 
body was laid out on the floor and 
covered with a sheet, he rejected 
the diagnosis. 

"He was sick and tired of living. 
But just when he was feeling at 
peace with the world — when his 
family had food, he had money in 
his pocket, he was stabbed in the 
back. You read it in the vile sheet 
which printed the articles that killed 
him. Who wrote them? It was not 
an enemy. It was his best friend 
who gets all of a sudden an idea 
that he must begin to tell the truth, 
and to tell the truth he must com- 
pare Manewitz with Ibsen, Mane- 
witz with Shakespeare, and being a 
candid friend, he had to admit that 
Manewitz was an imitator, a plagi- 
arist, a hack writer, and that he even 
stole scenes from his own plays. 
Did you ever hear the like? Tell the 
truth about anybody and there'll be 
nothing left of his character. The 
whole world would be destroyed by 
truth. All his life Manewitz told 
just enough of the truth to enable 
the world to live. All his life he 
fought like a bear. He prized loyal- 
ty and friendship and fought for 
friends, but when he saw this friend 
stick a dagger in his back, he did 
not care to fight any more. He gave 
it up. He made up his mind to die, 
and when he made up his mind, not 
all the East Side doctors could 
make it different. There was no use 
arguing with him." 

Indeed, Manewitz was beyond 
the reach of argument, especially 
any argument that Kemat could ad- 
vance. 

So let us return to the stage where 
the memorial services were being 
conducted. It was crowded with 
celebrities — uptown and downtown 
— labor leaders and intelligenzia, 
settlement workers and artists, all 



dressed in black. Near the dressing- 
room, in a corner, Kemat found a 
seat. He could see the back of the 
speakers and was saved the pain of 
hearing them. His eyes were hot 
and drv. He tried to get near the 
Manewitz family, but they were on 
the other side of the stage; they had 
no part to play in the exercise, ex- 
cept as mourners to weep copiously. 
Kemat went through the back en- 
trance and took the subway to the 
cemetery. Again, at the grave, there 
was a crowd through which he could 
not break; he bent down, tried to 
see what was going on through the 
legs of the fortunate ones gathered 
around the hole in the ground. He 
caught a glimpse of the coffin being 
lowered. He moved from one end 
of the circle to the other, trying to 
break through the crowd of men 
and women, but it was impossible. 
He felt like crying out loud to give 
expression to the physical pain he 
felt when the body was lowered, but 
his throat was closed and his lips 
would not move. The mob pressed 
against him and shoved him away 
from the grave. 

Kemat was alone in his grief. His 
world had come to an end when he 
had to keep on living in it. He left 
New York for a shack in the Cat- 
skills nears Fallsburgh, where he 
spent the summer. When he re- 
turned, it seemed as if time had 
stopped for him. He was unshaven, 
his clothes were dirty and ragged. 
He could barelv drag his legs, and 
his eyes were heavv with sleep. He 
was seeking familiar scenes, but the 
absence of one face made them all 
look strange and unfamiliar. 

He found himself in Marcus's 
cafe, listening to the murmur of 
conversation. Thev were talking of 
the theatre. His ears were strained 
to hear the name of Manewitz. The 
actor's union threatened a strike. 
Ritter made the threat by suggest- 
ing that he would retire from the 
stage or make a tour of South Amer- 
ica. Burlak was going to open the 
season with a new plav by Laker. 
Madame Lubella had a wonderful 
play that came to her, it was said, 
via Madame Duse. A newspaper- 
man said that the dramatist of the 
new season was to be Leon Gro- 
byan. Another threw Krolik's hat 
in the ring. Thev had forgotten 
Manewitz. 

Kemat wandered through the 
streets of the East Side. He did not 
enjoy the autumn smells, the bustle 
of preparation for the holidays, the 
eager faces of businessmen rushing 
about, satisfied that it was to be a 
good season. The reference to Gro- 
byan inspired a thought. Perhaps 



there was a way for him to remain 
with the theatre. He found Gro- 
byan in an apartment on Second 
Avenue, eating supper. He was dis- 
membering a herring with his fingers 
and stopping his thirst with tea. The 
room was in disorder. Grobyan's 
wife quickly shoved several children 
into another room and disappeared 
with them. 

Still eating with relish, Grobyan 
motioned with his head to Kemat 
to take a seat. 

'"What are you doing here, Ke- 
mat?" he inquired. 

"Then vou know mc," exclaimed 
Kemat. 

"You damn fool, who doesn't 
know you," growled Grobyan. 

Encouraged by this friendly recep- 
tion, Kemat said: 

"You know, I have been with 
Manewitz for fifteen years, and he 
was always satisfied with me. All 
of his plays I know, who has them, 
who plavs them, and how often." 

"Of course, your occupation is 
gone, my friend," said Grobyan. 
"There won't be any more playing 
of Manewitz. You will have to get 
yourself a new job." 

"That's the idea. Maybe I could 
do for vou what I did for Mane- 
witz," said Kemat, eagerly. 

"You could not do better for 
yourself. I have written God knows 
how many plays — most of them are 
good, some are even better," said 
Grobvan, "and now that Manewitz 
is dead, who but I am his natural 
successor, and my plays will be in 
great demand this season." 

"I could collect your royalties, 
you know," said Kemat, "and, more 
than that, I could watch them. I 
wouldn't let them plav any tricks 
with your plays. These managers 
must be watched." 

"That would never do," said Gro- 
bvan. "When I sell a play, it is 
sold; lock, stock and barrel it be- 
longs to the manager. It is because 
my plays don't bother me after I 
sell them that I enjoy life." 

Kemat looked at Grobyan sadly, 
and took his hat. He was in the 
wrong place after all. A theatre led 
by Grobvan was not to his liking. 

"A shoemaker, that's what you 
are," he muttered, and made for the 
door. 

Grobyan heard him, pushed the 
dishes away, and moved toward him. 

"That's an impudent rascal," he 
shouted. "Come to my house and 
calls me a shoemaker. Let me tell 
you that Manewitz's plays are as 
dead as he is. Those tedious plays 
he wrote were stolen from God 
knows who. If anyone wants to play 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



them now, they will have to be re- 
vamped and adapted and remade." 

"Who is there that dares to do 
that?" asked Kemat, looking back 
through the door. 

"The greatest Yiddish dramatist of 
this century — that's me," yelled 
Grobyan, as Kemat disappeared. 

He was right. They never played 
Manewitz's plays again, as they were 
originally written. Scenes were man- 
gled, omitted, words exchanged, 
endings altered. It was a free world. 
When next they gave one of them 
at the request of a dramatic club, it 
had to be given in the form of an 
adaptation and under the name of 
Manewitz, as author, were the 
words "Adapted by Leon Kobrin." 



"An ungrateful world," muttered 
Kemat, now a retired patriot. "It's 
bitter to live." 

The portrait of Manewitz — in a 
gilded frame — hangs in every Yid- 
dish theatre. In the club-rooms of 
the actors' union his big, bulging 
eyes look down upon the habitues 
as they play pinochle or poker, ex- 
change scandal and smoke cigar- 
ettes. In every book written on the 
Yiddish theatre they devote a chap- 
ter to Manewitz. His name is men- 
tioned at banquets. Joseph Baron- 
dess always arranges an annual ban- 
quet in his memory, and delivers 
a eulogv of the great dramatist. 
There was a man for you. Scenes 
that touched the heart. You could 
weep and you could cry. Words 



th t had sense. He had a philosophy 
of his own. What was it? Don't 
be a shegetz. Read Joel Antin's ar- 
ticles that have been bound in a 
volume, and he'll tell you. But he 
had everything — comedy, tragedy, 
ideals, problems. He was a man of 
the theatre. He made the theatre 
what it is. He is the master mind. 
This was the make-believe on pa- 
rade. 

But Kemat knew what was in 
their hearts. Pretense! They pre- 
ferred Grobvan's melodramas be- 
cause there was money in them. 
They like Krolik's feeble stories for 
thev had tears in them and the 
public paid dearly for that which 
brought them the satisfaction of 
weeping. They preferred the plays 



Yokels came to see, for there were 
more Yokels in the world than phi- 
losophers. Manewitz's words — those 
thick juicy words about which the}' 
would often brag in his lifetime — 
gave the actors a headache to mem- 
orize and besides, why should the 
public think of the playwright when 
there were actors who were dying 
for applause and appreciation? 

Kemat sees them pass into the 
theatre. He hears what they say 
when they leave after the perform- 
ance. He listens to the off-stage 
views of the actors. They can't bluff 
him. He knows them all. He shakes 
his fist at them and mutters: "Hypo- 
crites! Swine! He gave vou his life, 
left you pearls, and vou prefer 
shund!" 



Hadassah's Women of Glory 

By RABBI SIMCHA KLING, Befh David Synagogue. Greensboro, N. C. 

The following are the remarks made by Simcha KHng, Rabbi of Beth David 
Synagogue, at the meeting of the Greensboro Chapter of Hadassah, held on 
September 21st, as he presented pins to the past presidents of the chapter. 
THE EDITOR. 



When we look ahead, ten years 
is a long time. But, when we look 
back, it seems as if they were only 
a few days. However, when years 
have passed, we can judge the value 
of what we do, can see if our labors 
have been worthwhile. Therefore, 
when a decade has been fruitful, 
when growth has taken place, when 
lofty ideals have not remained ab- 
stract but have been carried out — 
then those years are not just years 
that are passed but are blessed years. 

That is what I feel about these 
ten years of Greensboro Hadassah; 
they have indeed been blessed years. 
It must have been difficult, ten years 
ago, in a Greensboro that did not 
have the Jewish population it has 
now, at a time when there were 
those who did not understand Zion- 
ism and became frightened at the 
very thought of a Hadassah chapter 
devoted to the cause of Israel re- 
born, at a time when the State of 
Israel did not yet exist and no one 
knew if Palestine could even exist 
much longer — at such a time, it 
must have been difficult to launch a 
Hadassah chapter. But the years 
have vindicated the faith and the 
labors of the founding mothers. 
People now know — or ought to 
know — that being a Zionist is only 
natural for a Jew and is the best 
means by which a Jew contributes 
to general American culture, that 
the establishment of the State of 
Israel means that Hadassah's work 
is just as important and just as nec- 
essary as before. And because of 
Hadassah's accomplishments and 
because of the great service you yet 
have to render, this tenth anniver- 



sary is a very important one and a 
very happy one. 

And, as I think of the women 
who worked and led and inspired 
others, I think of their counterparts 
in Israel, the chalutzot who worked 
to develop the land, to improve the 
lot of their brothers and sisters. 
One of the heroines of the early 
days was a woman who came to 
Palestine in the early 1900's, when 
life was extremely difficult and dan- 
gerous: Sarah Chizick. She was a 
dauntless woman, full of energy 
spent in building a homeland. Dur- 
ing the first World War, the Turks 
suspected the Jews of aiding the 
British and put many of the men 
in prison. Sarah thereupon became 
a breadwinner; she opened up a 
farm school for girls, where they 
raised food which they sold to the 
army. After the war Capt. Joseph 
Troumpeldor gathered a band of 
40 men to settle a new tract in 
northern Palestine, Tel Chai. 

As I think of this chalutza, who 
paved the way, who insisted that 
women share the responsibilities 
with men in rebuilding the Land, I 
think of your first President who 
was a pioneer in Greensboro Hadas- 
sah and who boldly paved the way 
for it's progress. For Hadassah, at 
that time, the way was difficult and 
dangerous, but she laid the founda- 
tions for it's growth and develop- 
ment. I am glad to present the past 
president's pin to Mrs. Philip Mi- 
chalove. 

Sarah Chizick was not the only 
one. There were other chalutzot, 
pioneers and heroines, other moth- 
ers in Israel. The poetess Rachel, 



was one of the most beloved. After 
reaching maturity, she discovered 
her people, realized the need for a 
homeland and gave up the comfort 
of her cultured Russian home to go 
to work the land she came to love 
so dearly, to make it bloom once 
again. She lived and worked along- 
side the beautiful Sea of Kinneret 
which she extolled in h e r songs. 
"V'ULAI" came from her pen, a 
song many of you know: "Perhaps 
this never really happened — perhaps 
this was only a dream". Rachel 
contracted TB and died as a young 
woman, but her words and her ex- 
ample of courage, devotion and 
work served as an example to all 
who shared her dream of Zion re- 
newed. As I think of her, I think 
of your second president — also a 
sensitive soul, a person devoted to 
her people, who wants the ancient 
Jewish homeland to blossom and 
flourish, whose words and deeds 
have been an example to other Jew- 
ish women. I am glad to present 
this pin to Mrs. Cyril Jacobs. 

Your third president reminds me 
of Hadassah's founder, Henrietta 
Szold, of blessed memory. She was 
a daughter of a loyal Jewish family 
she was loyal to tradition and loyal 
to learning. She studied, taught, 
translated, encouraged others. Here 
was a woman of vision, of capability, 
of boundless energy; Miss Szold was 
a woman who gave of herself com- 
pletely for her people's welfare. Your 
third president, too, is a woman 
loyal to tradition and loyal to study 
— a teacher — a devoted Jewess who 
gives of herself and her abilities for 
her people's welfare and betterment. 



I am glad to present this pin to 
Mrs. Max Zager. 

During World War II, there was 
a young woman who provided in- 
spiration to all Jewry. Growing up 
in an intellectual and assimilated 
family, Shanah Szenes, a gifted girl, 
came to realize her fate must be 
that of her people. She made her 
way to Palestine, entered an Agri- 
cultural school where she learned 
to till the land and to master the 
Hebrew language, in which she 
wrote her poems. She lived in Pales- 
tine for four years, coming to identi- 
fy herself completely with her peo- 
ple and her heritage. During the 
war, she felt that she must return 
to Europe to try to rescue her 
doomed brethren. She parachuted 
into Hungary, where she was cap- 
tured and condemned to death, in 
1944. After bravely stating: "I ask 
no mercy from hangmen", she died 
a Martyr's death. Shanah Szenes' 
poems and her diary have become 
part of our National Literature. One 
of the lines she quoted from the 
prophets became a daily slogan: 
"Whom shall I send? Send me." 

Your fourth president reminds 
me of Shana Szenes in her enthusi- 
asm, her manifold activities, her 
willingness and ability in all work 
that leads to the realization of Zion- 
ist ideals. In all her activities, she, 
too says: "Whom shall I send? 
Send me." I am glad to present 
this pin to Mrs. Harry Karesh. 

And now your present president 
— the captain at the helm, the wom- 
an who leads you and guides you 
to ever increased activity and better 

(Please Turn To Page 24) 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




The North Carolina B'nai B'rith Association, at its animal convention held 
in Chapel Hill last May, elected the TIMES-OUTLOOK to carry the monthly 
news of the association and of the member lodges, in its columns. This is the 
first of what we hope will be a column of interest to all our readers. If your 
lodge is not represented in this column, you only have yourself to blame. We 
cannot print what we do not know. Get your secretary to mail in your lodge 
news each month — by the first of each month preceding publication — to State 
Secretary Alvin Witten, Box 35, Gastonia, N. C. — THE EDITOR. 



Sidney J. Stern Lodge No. 603, Greensboro, N. C. 



The Sidney J. Stern Lodge was 
host to a group of national, district 
and state officials, as well as to offi- 
cers and leaders from a number of 
adjacent communities, on October 
5th. Included in the group of offi- 
cials was Philip M. Klutznick, na- 
tional president, Dr. Maurice Gold- 
berg, national vice president, Mau- 
rice A. Weinstein, district president, 
Julius Fisher, district secretary and 
Dr. Philip Naumoff, state president. 

An afternoon session was held at 
Beth David Synagogue at which 
matters of general Jewish commu- 
nity interest were discussed. Upon 
adjournment, the participants were 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. George 
Blanksetin, at their home, at a cock- 
tail hour. An evening session was 
held at Temple Emanuel. Both ses- 
sions were open forums and there 
were no set speeches. Many inter- 
esting problems were discussed and 
everyone keenly appreciated not 
only the opportunity to meet the 
top B' nai B'rith officials, but also 
at the many helpful suggestions 
that the discussions brought out. 



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President Cyril Jacobs announces 
the following schedule of programs, 
some of which arc for the time 
being tentative. Fuller details will 
be given each month. 

November 9th, Beth David Syna- 
gogue, 8:00 P. M. — Recognition of 
twenty-five year members with 
award of Certificates by State Pres- 
ident Dr. Philip Naumoff. Award 
to the B'nai B'rith Softball winners 
of the city Championship. Social 
hour and refreshments. 

December 14th — Date open for 
later announcement. 

January 11, 1954— Musical Pro- 
gram in celebration of Jewish Music 
Month, open to men and women. 
More details later. 

February 8th — Open forum for 
the entire community on the sub- 
ject of the need for a Jewish Com- 
munity Council for Greensboro. 
More details on this later. 

Don't forget our Wednesday 
Luncheon meetings which take 
place every week at 12:30 P. M. in 
the private room at the rear of the 
second floor of the S&W Cafeteria. 
Some short and interesting pro- 
grams are being planned and we 
think that we. can promise you the 
kind of meetings we used to have 
years ago when most of our mem- 
bers looked forward to these enjoy- 
able affairs. 

Frank Goldberg Lodge 
No. 1310, Gastonia, N. C. 

Present indications are that mem- 
bership will show an increase after 
being the same for the past few 
years. 

First meeting of the season 
started off with a very good attend- 
ance and several projects were 
planned to raise money to meet 





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THE COVER 

Among the B'nai B'rith officials who attended the meeting at Tem- 
ple Emanuel, Greensboro, the night of October 6th, were the fol- 
lowing. Reading from left to right, sitting: Maurice A. Weinstein, 
president, 5th District Grand Lodge; Philip M. Klutznick, national 
president; Dr. Maurice Goldberg, national vice-president; standing; 
Cyril Jacobs, president, Sidney J. Stern Lodge; Julius Fisher, secre- 
tary, 5th District Grand Lodge and Dr. Philip Naumoff, president, 
North Carolina B'nai B'rith Association. Photo by Max Zager. 



commitments and finance new af- 
fairs. It was also decided to have 
more affairs for the entire commu- 
nity and also to invite neighboring 
communities to join with us for eve- 
nings of good fun. 

STATE ASSOCIATION 
NEWS 

The Executive Committee met 
on September 20th, at the Hotel 
Barringer in Charlotte. 

Dr. Philip Naumoff, president, 
announced that the next State con- 
vention would be held in Winston- 
Salem on May 1st and 2nd, 1954. 
Maurice A. Weinstein, District 5 
president, announced that caravans 
would again tour the cities of the 
country after January 1954. Al 
Smith, district co-chairman of ADL 
spoke on the activties of his divi- 
sion and reported that the respson- 
bilities of the commission were 
being carried out in satisfactory 
fashion. He referred to the dinner 
on November 23d in Washington, 
at which President Dwight D. Ei- 
senhower is to be given an ADL 
award. This is to be televised na- 
tionally. 

Report of treasurer Bernard J. 
Warschauer indicated that there 
was a balance of $1,435.84, includ- 
ing $500 as the State's part in the 
profits of the district convention. 

Dr. Leon Feldman sponsored a 
motion, which was carried, asking 
that the date of the next district 
convention be discussed at the mid- 
winter session of the district execu- 
tive committee, inasmuch as the 
planned date conflicts with gradu- 
ations in North Carolina. The 
committee allocated the sum of 
$125 to next year's State Institute 
of Judaism. 

CHAPEL HILL LODGE 

The prinicpal event that featured 
the activities of the Chapel Hill 
Lodge during the past month was 
the dedication of the chapel at the 
Hillel House. The chapel was the 
gift of Mr. and Mrs. George Blank- 
stein, of Greensboro. The program 
of the event was as follows: Greet- 
ings, from Rabbi Aaron J. Tofield, 
North Carolina Ministerial Associ- 
ation; Rev. Richard Jackson, presi- 



dent, Chapel Hill Ministerial Asso- 
ciation; Clyde E. Teague, of the 
University of North Carolina; 
Henry Isaacson, president, Hillel 
Cabinet, U. N. C; Rabbi Fred Ryp- 
ins, counsellor, Hillel Chapter, 
Women's College; Dr. Philip 
Naumoff, president of the N. C. 
B'nai B'rith Association; Maurice 
A. Weinstein, president 5th Dis- 
trict Grand Lodge, B'nai B'rith; 
Milton Huppert, president, Chapel 
Hill Lodge; Mrs. Ephraim Rosen- 
sweig, president, Women's Hillel 
Association. 

(Please Turn To Page 34) 




Rabbi Herschel Schacter of the Bronx, 
N. Y., who served as general chairman 
of the Rabbinical Council convention 
committee. Rabbi Schacter is spiritual 
leader of the Mosholu Jewish Center in 
the Bronx. 




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9 



HAMPTON, VA. 

Mrs. Gerald Bloch, Correspondent 



The State Conference of Wom- 
en's Branch of the Union of Ortho- 
dox Jewish Congregation met at the 
Adath Jeshurun, Newport News, on 
October 25th. Mrs. Beryl Kirener of 
Hampton, program chairman, intro- 
duced Mrs. Uri Miller of Baltimore 
as the guest speaker. Mrs. Miller is 
the National vice-president of the 
Women's Branch. Representatives 
of Richmond, Norfolk, Berkeley, 
Newport News, and Hampton at- 
tended the conference and the work 
shops. 

The first meeting of the New 
Year of Sisterhood, B'nai Israel 
Congregation, was held Monday 
evening, October 19th. Mrs. Harry 
Jacobs, president, named the follow- 
ing committee chairman for 1953- 
54. Mrs. Beryl Kirsner, program 
chairman; Mrs. Herbert Goldstein, 
library; Mrs. Allen Mirvis and Mrs. 
Arthur Lieverman, membership; 
Mrs. Morris Epstein and Mrs. Issac 
Kirsner, religious affairs; Mrs. M. S. 
Cooper and Mrs. I. A. Saunders, 
sick; Mrs. Morris Gottlieb, Sunday 
School; Mrs. Milton Epstein and 
Mrs. Isadore Cooper, Golden Book 
inscription; Mrs. Morris Epstein, 
gift fund; Mrs. Daniel Goldstein, 
publicity; Mrs. Arthur Greenberg 
and Miss Mildred Fox, Oneg Shab- 
bot; Mrs. Jack Fisher, Mrs. Samuel 
Hendin, and Mrs. Bernard Wein- 
flash, hospitality; Mrs. Alfred Gold- 
stein, representative to the men's 
congregation; Mrs. Stanley Press, 
house committee; Mrs. Murray 
Press, decorations; Mrs. Milton 
Familant and Mrs. Joseph New- 
man, telephone; Mrs. Joseph Tan- 
nen, Community cooperation; Mrs. 
Gerald Bloch, ways and means; Mrs. 
Edward Garrick, youth group; Mrs. 
Morris Gottlieb and Mrs. Morris 
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Shabbot; Mrs. Melvin Carmel, Ha- 
dassah representative. 

Mrs. Jacobs also named as co- 
chairmen of the ways and means 
committee Mesdames Joseph Green- 
berger, Kieve Sear, Louis Green- 
spon, Edgar Baron, and Milton Ep- 
stein. The first money-making proj- 
ect for Sisterhood that is already 
under way is the Card Party. Mrs. 
Mac Weissman, assisted by Mrs. 
M. Familant and Mrs. J. Newman, 
is in charge of this program. 

A playlet was presented at this 
meeting called "Mirror Magic." The 
cast was as follows: Mrs. M. S. 
Cooper, Mrs. Martel Epstein, Miss 
Joyce Gottlieb, Miss Jean Gold- 
stein, Miss Pattic Sharf, Mr. Jimmie 
Goldstein, Mrs. I. Michaelson, and 
Mrs. I. Cooper. 

Hadassah held its first meeting of 
the season October 8th. Mrs. Mel- 
vin Carmel presided and greeted all 
new members. The program, a com- 
edy skit, entitled "First Edition" 
proved very entertaining. Those par- 
ticipating in the skit were — Mrs. 
Louis Greenspon, Mrs. Jerome 
Persh, Mrs. George Recant, Mrs. 
Maurice Calm, Mrs. Philip Abra- 
ham, Mrs. Mac Weissman, and 
Howard Fisher. Mrs. Samuel Hen 
din was the piano accompanist. 

The teaching staff of the Sunday 
Religious School met last month 
with the rabbi to set the curriculum 
for the new term. Teaching this 
year are Mrs. Edward Garrick, Mrs. 
All Gessow, Mrs. Ham- Jacobs, 
Bernard Robinson, Bernard Wein- 
flash, Monroe Wiener, and Rabbi 
Mirvis. Sunday morning Minyan 
and breakfast are being planned and 
will be sponsored by the Synagogue 
Youth Group. 

The community joins in express- 
ing its heartfelt sympathy to the 
family of Raymond Kirsner; to Mrs. 
David Norad on the passing of her 
mother, Mrs. Celia Zedd; and to 
the family of Mrs. Yetta Sharf. Also 
to the family of Mr. Joseph Wasser- 
man who passed away Oct. 5th. 
May they find comfot in their mem- 
ories and in Israel's faith in life 
eternal. 

During the summer Francine was 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Beryl Saun- 
ders; Richard Lee to Mr. and Mrs. 
William Kahn (nee Roberta Gold- 
stein); Deborah to Mr. and Mrs. 
Louis Stadin (nee Frances Wolsh); 
and Debra to Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
(Please Turn To Page 31) 



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10 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



NORFOLK - HOPEWELL, VA. 



SUFFOLK, YA. 

Mrs. Meyer R. Goldberg, Correspondent 
Now that the holiday season is bread, chopped herring 



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75 1 I Granby St. 
NORFOLK, VA. 




past, Suffolk is getting busy with its 
organization work once more. 

The first meeting of the year for 
Hadassah was devoted to member- 
ship and everyone seemed most 
happy to settle down to serious bus- 
iness once again. 

On Monday evening, October 
12th, Suffolk Hadassah was most 
fortunate to have as their guest- 
speaker, Mrs. E. J. Evans of Dur- 
ham, N. C. Having recently re- 
turned from a visit to Israel, Mrs. 
Evans gave the members a vivid pic- 
ture of Israel today and especially 
stressed the very wonderful results 
of the various Hadassah projects. 
Charming speaker that she is, Mrs. 
Evans kept her audience spell- 
bound and made the evening a 
most memorable occasion. 

The first fall meeting of the Sis- 
terhood of Agudath Achin Syna- 
gogue was held on the last Tuesday 
of September with Mrs. Charles 
Levy presiding. A full report was 
given on the painting of the syna- 
gogue and vestry room, which was 
undertaken by the Sisterhood 
through the summer months. The 
newly re-decorated synagogue con- 
tributed greatly to a most enjoyable 
holiday season. 

The Simchas Torah Party held 
by the Sisterhood drew a large 
and fun-loving gathering. All sorts 
of Home-made goodies — mandel- 



brownies 

and cakes, were auctioned off to the 
highest bidders and helped fill the 
almost depleted coffers of Sister- 
hood. A buffet supper prepared by 
the hospitality committee with Mrs. 
J. Stutson as chairman, rounded out 
a very pleasant evening. 

The Bernard A. Winer Lodge 
No. 1 393 B'nai B nth held its open- 
ing meeting on T uesday evening, 
October 6th. Plans were made for 
the several affairs to be held during 
the coming year. 

The Ladies' Chapter of B'nai 
B'rith also met on the same eve- 
ning with Mrs. Frank Laderberg 
presiding. Mrs. Stella Davis, finan- 
cial chairman, outlined several 
money raising plans she has made 
for the year, the first of which, a 
rummage sale will be held in the 
near future. 

On Saturday morning, October 
17th, Bar Mitzvah services of Jackie 
Hirsh, son of Dr. and Mrs. Kurt 
Hirsh of Franklin, Va. were held in 
the Agudath Achin Synagogue. The 
preceding night Jackie had con- 
ducted the entire Sabbath Eve serv- 
ice. His "Maftir" was beautifully 
delivered. Following the services 
Dr. and Mrs. Hirsh entertained with 
a buffet luncheon in the vestry 
room of the synagogue in honor of 
their son. Mazel Tov, Dr. and Mrs. 
Hirsh! 



HARRISONBURG. YA. 

Mrs. Michael Mintzer, Correspondent 



Better late than never so here is 
wishing all of you readers a very 
Happy and Healthy New Year. 

Rabbi and Mrs. Kaplan told us 
so many interesting stories of their 
wonderful trip abroad. They saw 
many things and met man}' people 
and really thoroughly enjoyed 
themselves but they were happy to 
come back to the United States. 

During the summer, our Sister- 
hood and Men's Club had a com- 
bined picnic but as luck would have 
it, it rainsed so the folks that were 
there picnicked between the rain- 
drops. 

Our New Year season started 
with a reception following the Rosh 
Hashonah services. 

A Sisterhood meeting was held 
with our new president, Mrs. Ron- 
ald Ney presiding. Discussion took 
place for the future events to take 
place and we are all looking for- 
ward to an active season. 

For our Succoth Holiday Service, 
the Mens Club and a committee 



from the Sisterhood erected a most 
beautifully decorated Succoth. On 
the Friday night service during Suc- 
coth all the children participated in 
the Services and it sure was a won- 
derful sight to see. 

A Hadassah meeting was held at 
the home of Mrs. L. Miler. Mrs. 
Morton Nussbaum and Mrs. Dave 
Miller were eo-hostesses. Since this 



F. H. 

AYERS 
& SON 

SEAFOOD 

Foot of Elm Ave. 
PORTSMOUTH, VA. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



1 I 



was the first meeting of the season, 
many important matters were dis- 
cussed. Mrs. Jos. Kimmell was 
elected delegate to attend the Con- 
ventions that is to be held in Wash- 
ington. A social hour followed the 
business session. 

A hearty welcome to our new 
member sof the Congregation: Mr. 
and Mrs. Dave Frankel and family, 
Mr. and Mrs. Kurt Lerner and fam- 
ily, Mr. John Stewart and Mr. Rob- 
ert Osternick. 

Our Covered dish supper was a 
huge success — you should have 
heard all the compliments — natu- 
rally, the food was delicious. Three 
cheers for the committee. 

DANVILLE, YA. 

Mrs. M. H. Lowenstein, Correspondent 




RABBI SIMCHA FEDER 

Rabbi Simcha Feder, new spiri- 
tual leader of Aetz Chaim, and his 
wife arrived in Danville the first of 
September. Rabbi Feder was born 
in Jerusalem, and received his secu- 




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Like all of our ambulances, 
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Phone 6283 



ROANOKE, VA. 



lar education at Brooklyn College 
and Johns Hopkins University. He 
received his Hebrew and Divinity 
training at Mesifta Torah Vadaat in 
Brooklyn and Ner Israel Divinity 
College in Baltimore. From 1945 to 
1949 he was the Rabbi of Netzah 
Israel in Brooklyn, and during the 
past three years, he was supervisor 
and guidance counselor at the Jew- 
ish Educational Center in Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Succoth and Simchas Torah Sen - 
ices were held, and the children 
were given bags of candies. 

Hebrew classes began October 
6th. 

Several adult educational classes 
have been conducted by Rabbi 
Feder at his home. 

The Young Judca group met Sun- 
day, October 4th at the Aetz Chaim 
social hall. Sonny Klaff was elected 
president, Ronnie Berman, and 
David Schrcibfeder as vice-presi- 
dents, Judith Rosenberg, recording 
secretary, Lenny Heller, correspond- 
ing secretary, and Danny Hain, 
treasurer. The club invited the boys 
and girls of Martinsville to join the 
Danville club, and they took in 5 
members from Martinsville on Sun- 
day. They hope that they will have 
more join soon. 

Mrs. Beck Davidowitz was ap- 
pointed the Hadassah Advisor to 
Young Judea. 

Mrs. Louis Berman, Mrs. Harry 
Calish, and Mrs. Walter Feibelman 
were the hostesses of the first sister- 
hood luncheon meeting held this 
month in the Temple social hall. 
The sisterhood is sponsoring a Ju- 
daica shop and lending library this 
year. 

The Men's Club had its supper 
meeting in the Sukah, Monday eve- 
ning, Sept. 27th. Alvin Silverman 
was elected president of the club. 

The Temple youth met Sunday, 
Oct. 4th, and formed the Danville 
branch of the National Federation 
of Temple Youth. Kenneth Passa- 
maneck was chosen as president, 
Joyce Berman as Recording Secre- 
tary and Treasurer, and Eddie 
Friedman as Corresponding Secre- 
tary. 

Succoth and Simchas Torah Sen - 
ices were held. After Succoth serv- 
ices a Kiddush, sponsored by the 
sisterhood was held in the lovely 
Sukah which was constructed by Dr. 
Flenry Nakdimen, Mr. Albert Kop- 
len, and Mr. Louis Berman. Fol- 
lowing the Simchas Torah services, 
Rabbi Arnold Shevlin gave the chil- 
dren Israeli candy bars. 

Hebrew and Sabbath school 
classes have begun. 



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Current 3% Dividends 
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\2 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



PORTSMOUTH - SUFFOLK, YA. 



PORTSMOUTH, YA. 



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Dear Lonzmen, 

We're all so busy these days, it's 
hard to believe that summer and 
vacation time isn't so far in the past 
after all. 

High Holiday services were espe- 
cially beautiful this year with the 
Choir at Gomley Chesed Synagogue 
lending additional glory to the holi- 
days. Cantor Paul Grob and the 
choristers are to be congratulated. 

If it's a bit quiet around town it's 
not because the organizations aren't 
busy. It's because so many of the 
young men and women of the com- 
munity are away at college. And 
the youngsters are busy with regular 
school, Hebrew School, and Sunday 
School, all of which are progressing 
nicelv. 

Hadassah is planning to celebrate 
the 20th anniversary of Youth Ali- 
yah at their November meeting 
with an outstanding speaker and ex- 
cellent program. 

Two big public relation jobs of 
B'nai B'rith resulted in good com- 
munity relations and good programs. 
The October meeting was dedicated 
to Americanization with essay con- 
test winners reading their prize-win- 
ning essays. Elementary and high 
school students, both Negro and 
white, from the city, county, and 
Parochial schools participated. 

In November, the Woman of the 
Year for 1952, Mrs. Mary Le 
Compte, will be honored. 

B'nai B'rith men are also plan- 
ning a stag meeting at the club 
either the end of October or early 
in November, which will be the cul- 
mination of their membership drive, 
headed by Dr. Arthur Seigel, assisted 
by Bob Rascover. There will be a 
good speaker, good food, and other 
good entertainment. 

Congratulations also to B'nai 
B'rith men who are going to do 
something definite about Ports- 
mouth's lack of civilian defense. The 
committee is headed by David R. 
Levin, assisted by Belvin Blachman. 

Sympathy is extended to the fam- 
ily of the late Mrs. Lena Jacobson, 
who died in September at Balti- 
more, Md. A former resident of 



Portsmouth, Mrs. Jacobson had re- 
sided in recent years in Memphis, 
Tenn. 

T he Zionist organization is plan- 
ning programs of a less serious na- 
ture this season. In October, guest 
speaker. Rabbi Paul Reich, of Tem- 
ple Beth-El, Norfolk, gave a com- 
prehensive talk, with slides and mo- 
vies, of his recent tour of Israel. The 
new program chairman is Dr. Har- 
old Schetchel, Portsmouth's newest 
chiropodist. The membership com- 
mittee, headed by Joe Reshefsky, is 
going all out for members. In Jan- 
uary, the national ZOA Caravan 
will be here. Watch this column 
for further plans. 

One of the entertainment high- 
lights of the season is Sisterhood's 
annual Cotillion. This outstanding 
affair will be held as usual at the 
Suburban Country Club on Thanks- 
giving night. We suggest that if 
you haven't already purchased your 
tickets, you do so immediately be- 
cause this is one affair that no one 
misses. Mrs. E 1 i a s Friedman is 
chairman. 

There's only one trouble with the 
Gomley Chesed Sunday School. It's 
becoming so popular because it's 
considered one of the best-staffed 
and best-organized in the state, that 
the rooms are bursting at the seams. 
With the largest enrollment on rec- 
ord, the rooms are getting more and 
more crowded. 

Under the sponsorship of Sister- 



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The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



13 



hood and with the able assistance of 
Rabbi Leeman, a successful Sunday 
School Training Institute was held. 

Using the theme of "Judaism in 
the Home" for their year's work, 
Sisterhood is planning bigger and 
better programs. They had a dilly 
in September based on the program, 
"This Is Your Life." 



By the way, have you sent in your 
$2 yet for your subscription to the 
Outlook? If not, do so at once. 
Address: American - Jewish Times- 
Outlook, Post Office Box 701, Rich- 
mond. 

That's 30 for now. 

Your friend, 
Irma 



LYNCHBURG, VA. 

Mrs. Gishy Aronson, Correspondent 

In the pulpit the Rabbi wanted 
to know how we could get closer 
to each other. So Lynchburgers 
starting the year out right wished 
each other "good yontiff" and made 
merry at Sisterhood's Yom Kippur 
Dance. The scene was set in ye 
ole Community Center and the 
time was right for the generous 
sized crowd, which turned out in 
festive mode. Undaunted by Lynch- 
burg's acute male shortage, (atten- 
tion bachelors!) your pen pushing 
pal spent an enjoyable evening in 
the company of married folk. 

Out of town faces glimpsed were 
the Victor Heiners from Roanoke— 
the attractive missus being the for- 
mer Frances Schewel and her cousin 
Ada (Sister) Salsburg from Norfolk. 
On hand were Maxie Feinman and 
a charming blonde companion — his 
big moment and darling bride to 
be! In our midst again is Edward 
Feinman out of khaki and his wife, 
the former Maxinc Oppleman. 

When the music gave out with 
the down beat it was sweet notes of 
Jay Arnold, that enhanced the lively 
tempo of Darrin O'Brien. 

Responsible for the event were 
Committee Chairman Shirley Lev- 
in, Ruth Sybil Greif, Dorothy Nan 
Samuels and Sylvia Tennenbaum. 

The Lafayette Society has an- 
nounced several additions to the 
(Please Turn To Page 27) 



NEWPORT NEWS, YA. 

Mrs. Martha A. Shapiro, Correspondent 
The Fall season has come once 
again and already all organizations 
in the city have swung into full ac- 
tivity. 

The Golden Age group of the 
Center held their first Fall meeting 
on October 8. An enjoyable evening 
was spent with Rabbi and Mrs. 
Samuel Adelman presenting a spe- 
cial program of Jewish music. Plans 
were also made for future programs 
for the group. Officers are Kenneth 
Arch, President; Mrs. E. J. Graff, 
Vice-President; Mrs. I. Levinson, 
Secretary, and Mrs. H. Ellenson, 
Treasurer. 

The opening meeting of the 
1953-54 season of the Ladies Aux- 
iliary of Adath Jeshurun Synagogue 
was held on Monday, October 5, 
with Mrs. Hilda Ellenson, presid- 
ing. Mrs. Ellenson introduced her 
new committee chairmen for the 
coming year, and the first fund-rais- 
ing affair. Auxiliary's Home Card 
Parties, was announced. Mrs. Hilda 
Werblow, First Vice-President, ap- 
pointed Mrs. Maurice Block and 
Mrs. Hilda Scoll co-chairmen of the 
Card Parties. 

Mrs. Ruth Slavin and Mrs. An- 
nabelle Trief, program co-chairmen, 
presented a playlet entitled "Mirror 
Magic." Those participating were 
Mesdames Lea Rosenwasser, Mimi 
Green, Sarah Shcwel, Pearl Saville, 
Dorothy Snyder, Tillie Diamon- 
(Please Turn To Page 28) 



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14 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



Congratulations to the 
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Entrees for the main meal of the 
day sometimes present a problem. 
To be able to prepare them with 
sufficient variety is an accomplish- 
ment. Perhaps the following sug- 
gestions might be of assistance to 
the perplexed housewife. 

Chicken Croquettes 

Chop the chicken very fine, using 
the white meat alone, or the dark 
meat alone, or both together. Sea- 
son with salt, pepper, onion-juice, 
and lemon-juice. Chopped mush- 
rooms, sweetbreads, calf's brains, 
tongue, or truffles are used with 
chicken, and a combination of two 
or more of them much improves 
the quality of the croquettes. 
Croquettes of Calf's Brains 

Lay the brains in salt water an 
hour, or until they look perfectly 
white, then take out one at a time, 
pat with your hands to loosen the 
outer skin and pull it off. Beat or 
rub them to a smooth paste with a 
wooden spoon, season with salt and 
pepper and a very little mace; add a 
beaten egg and about one-half cup 
of bread crumbs. Heat fat in a spi- 
der and fry large spoonfuls of this 
mixture in it. 

Meat Croquettes 

Veal, mutton, lamb, beef and 
turkey croquettes may be prepared 
in the same way as chicken cro- 
quettes. 

Meat and Boiled Hominy 
Croquettes 

Equal proportions. 

Sweetbread Croquettes 

Cut the boiled sweetbreads into 
small dice with a silver knife. Mix 
with mushrooms, using half the 
quantity of mushrooms that you 
have of sweetbreads. Use two eggs 
in the sauce. 

Veal Croquettes 

Veal is often mixed with chicken, 
or is used alone as a substitute for 
chicken. Season in same manner 
and make the same combinations. 
Veal Sweetbreads (Fried) 

Wash and lay your sweetbreads in 
slightly salted cold water for an 
hour. Pull off carefully all the outer 
skin, wipe dry and sprinkle with salt 
and pepper. Heat some goose-fat in 
a spider, lay in the sweetbreads and 
fry slowly on the back of the stove, 
turning frequently until they are a 
nice brown. 



Calf's Feet, Prunes and Chestnuts 

Two calf's feet, sawed into joints, 
seasoned with pepper and salt a day 
before using. Place in an iron pot, 
one-half pound Italian chestnuts 
that have been scalded and skinned, 
then the calf's feet, one-eighth 
pound of raisins, one pound of fine 
prunes, one small onion, one small 
head of celery root, two olives cut 
in small pieces, one-eighth teaspoon 
of paprika, one cup of soup stock. 
Stew slowly for five hours, and add 
one hour before serving, while boil- 
ing, a wine glass claret and a wine 
glass sherry. Do not stir. 

Calf's Feet, Scharf 

Take calf's feet, saw into joints; 
put on to boil within cold water 
and boil slowly until the gristle 
loosens from the bones. Season with 
salt, pepper, and a clove or two of 
garlic. Serve hot or cold to taste. 

Calf's Foot Jelly 

After carefully washing one calf's 
foot, split and put it on with one 
quart water. Boil from four to five 
hours. Strain and let stand over- 
night. Put on stove next day and 
when it begins to boil add the stiff- 
beaten whites of two eggs; boil till 
clear, then strain through cheese- 
cloth. Add sherry and sugar to 
taste. Let it become firm before 
serving. 

Croquettes of Fish 

Take any kind of boiled fish, sep- 
arate it from the bones carefully, 
chop with a little parsley, salt and 
pepper to taste. Beat up one egg 
with one teaspoon of milk and flour. 
Roll the fish into balls and turn 
them in the beaten egg and cracker 
crumbs or bread. Fry a light brown. 
Serve with any sauce or a mayon- 
naise 

Rice Croquettes 

Separate the white and yolk of 
one egg and reserve about half the 
yolk for coating the croquette. Beat 
the rest with the white. Mix with 
two cups of boiled or steamed rice 
and one-half teaspoon of salt, form 
into oblong croquettes or small 
balls. Mix- the reserved part of the 
egg yolk with a tablespoon of cold 
water. Dip croquettes in this and 
then roll in fine bread crumbs. Re- 
peat until well-coated, then fry 
brown in deep oil. 



For that 

"Smile of Pleasure" 
SAY 

'MAKE MINE 

RUPPERT 




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Cape Fear Distributing Co. 

Fayetteville, N. C 
% Jones Distributing Co. 

Elizabeth City, N. C 
Greensboro Distributing Co. 

Greensboro, N. C. 
£ State Distributing Co. 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Minges Beer Co. 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 
Roxboro Beverage Co. 

Roxboro, N. C. 
£ Sloop Distributing Co. 

Salisbury, N. C. 
C. O. Tankard Co. 

Washington, N. C. 
Eastern Distributing Co. 

Wilmington, N. C. 
% Voss Pearce Distributors 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
J. C. Schweers Beverage Co. 

Charleston, S. C. 
9 Summer Beverage Co. 

Columbia, S. C. 
Florence Beverage Co. 

Florence, S. C. 
Piedmont Beverage Sales 

Greenville, S. C. 

RUPPERT 
BREWERY 

NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




ME VIRGINIA REPORTER 



NEWS OF THE STATE BY OUTLOOK CORRESPONDENTS 



RICHMOND, YA. 




Left to right: Extending good wishes Nat Polis, Norfolk, Albert Liniado, Rich- 
mond, Ted Rees, Sam Schultz, S. I. Seldes. 

BETH SHOLOM HOME 

Mrs. Fritz Lowenthal, Correspondent 



Sunday, October 4th, 1953, a Tes- 
timonial dinner was given in honor 
of Mr. S. I. Seldes, which was spon- 
sored by the Israel Bond Drive. 
Everybody knows how much Mr. 
Seldes did, not only as president of 
Beth Sholom, but for the Jewish 
Community at large. He was the 
one who sold the most Bonds for 
Israel. Mr. Julius Ginsberg was the 
guest speaker and Miss Miriam Sit- 
ner of Philadelphia, one of the few 
female cantors, entertained an audi- 
ence of more than 300. The Board 
of Directors of Beth Sholom Home 
presented Mr. Seldes with a large 
silver tray. We all are very proud 
to be associated with an outstand- 
ing man like our own Mr. Samuel 
I. Seldes. 

On October 6th, our residents 
had a very pleasant excitement, we 
had a Briss at our home. We want 
to extend our congratulations to 
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Schultz to the 
birth of their new son. Also con- 
gratulations to Mr. and Mrs. Sam 
Schultz as grandparents. Thank you 
Mr. Schultz for letting our friends 
at the Home witness this so very 
important event. You showed us 



how very close you are to our Beth 
Sholom Home. You are not only 
our chairman of the house, but also 
a good friend to the residents. 

Beth Sholom Sisterhood 

Mrs. J. Weinberger, Correspondent 

Beth Sholom Sisterhood opened 
Luncheon at 12:30, Monday, Sep- 
tember 28, at the Hotel Raleigh. 

Approximately 130 members at- 
tended and the affair was treated 
with great enthusiasm. 

A skit was presented in which 
Mrs. Louis Goodstein was modera- 
tor. Members of the panel discus- 
sion were: Mrs. I. Carton, Mrs. S. T. 
Seldes, Mrs. Max Laster, Mrs. Ellis 
Bernstein and Mrs. Fritz Loewen- 
thal. 

The Skit was followed by a film 
of the membership luncheon held 
in January 1953. 

Program chairman of the day was 
Mrs. J. L. Watts. 

Residents of the Beth Sholom 
Home have been happily contribut- 
ing their share toward the Rich- 
mond Jejwish Community Fund 
Campaign. 



They have put over 10,000 Red 
Feathers into envelopes and ad- 
dressed them. 

They thoroughly enjoyed making 
up workers kits and are constantly 
on the outlook for something to do 
to add to their part as members of 
the Richmond Area Community. 



HADASSAH 

Mrs. N. J. Flax, Correspondent 

Mrs. Sam Penn, President of the 
Richmond Senior Chapter Hadas- 
sah, announces her new officers for 
the year 1953-54. Mrs. Jerome 
Meyer is Vice-President in charge 
of administration. Mrs. Louis Stein- 
berg is Vice-President in charge of 
membership, education and organi- 
zation, and Mrs. Irwin Shapiro is 
Vice-President in charge of fund 
raising for Youth Aliyah (children 
from broken homes who have come 
from different parts of Europe and 
the Near East to Israel and will be 
rehabilitated to a new and healthy 
way of life) and funds for medical 
supplise for Hadassah's main proj- 
ects which are its hospitals, medical 
school, vocational guidance clinics 
for its youth and Bonds for Israel. 
The other officers of the Executive 
Board are: Mrs. Marc Schneider, 
Administration Secretary; Mrs. H. 
Osmalov, Advisor; Miss H. Snukals, 
Regional Liaison; Mrs. H. Becker, 
Recording Secretary; Mrs. Ben Gar- 
field, Corresponding Secretary; Mrs. 
Jos. Picon, Ass't. Corresponding Sec- 
retary; Mrs. Stanley Wasserman, Fi- 
nancial Secretary; Mrs. Stanley Plot- 
kin, Ass't. Financial Secretary; Mrs. 
Ben Bernstein, Treasurer. 

The program for meetings is as 
follows: November: Hadassah Sup- 
ply Party; December: Paid-Up Mem- 
bership "Dues and Don't" Party; 
January: Donor Cavalcade; Febru- 
ary: "Inter-faith Meeting" — Joint 
meeting with B&P; March: Youth 
Services Meeting; April: J.N.F. Par- 
ty; May: Installation of Officers. 



B. and P. HADASSAH 

Mrs. J. M. Mendel, Correspondent 

Mrs. Arthur Kavit, president of 
the Business and Professional Divi- 
sion of Hadassah, has recently an- 
nounced plans to make this year 
one of the greatest both socially 
and financially. 

On October 7th, the study group, 
headed bv Education Chairman, 
Mrs. Murray Levy, held its first 
meeting at the home of Mrs. Will 
Shockett, 4300 Park Ave. at 8:15 
P.M. Education for creative Jew- 
ish living has always been an Ameri- 
can project of Hadassah, the ever- 
growing network of study, discus- 
sion and book review groups and 
institutes being designed to equip 
its members to understand their 
Jewish cultural heritage in order to 
enrich their lives as Jews in this 
country. Mrs. Levy is well known 
for her prominent background in 
Hebrew literature and her outstand- 
ing work on the staff of the Beth El 
Sunday School and Hebrew School. 

On October 14th the regular 
meeting was held at 8:15 P.M. at 
the Wm. Byrd Hotel. October 
highlighted Youth Aliyah, one of 
the most important projects of Ha- 
dassah. Youth Aliyah acts as official 
representative in America of the im- 
migration movement of the Jewish 
Agency for Palestine, the bodv 
charged with the resettlement and 
rehabilitation of the Jewish youth 
refugees in Israel. This movement 
was begun in 1936. Since 1936 Ha- 
dassah has taken an active part in 
the work, by means of which more 
than 60,000 refugee youngsters — 
from 70 different countries have 
been settled in Israel and provided 
with maintenance and education un- 
til thev could assume their rightful 
place in their new homeland. Youth 
Aliyah graduates have become a po- 
tent and positive force in the agri- 
cultural and industrial development 
of Israel. There are still tens of 
thousands in the ghettos of the Mid- 
dle East, North Africa and "Iron 
Curtain" Europe who are waiting 
(Please Turn To Page 37) 



16 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 





CfHiOLINRS 




Abound Qn&esvbbcwa 

Geri Le Brun and Genie Jacobs, Correspondents 



Well, it was a long wait, but it 
was worth it. Ellen Judith Clein is 
just as cute as she can be. We 
thought for a while there that 
Selma and Bob Clein were trying to 
get some sort of a record, but fi- 
nally, on September 4th, Selma 
went to Cone Hospital and pro- 
duced a fine, 10 pound baby girl 
upon which the whole community 
let out an audible sigh of relief. 
Thank you, Mrs. Clein. Selma's 
mother, Mrs. Fred Frietag of New 
York came to the rescue when 
Selma needed "Help around the 
House," and stayed on to help lit- 
tle Howard get used to his new sis- 
ter and help the nurse and Selma 
with formulas, etc. Mrs. Frietag 




ELIMINATES STAIR CLIMBING 



Invalids, older folks 
and people with 
heart ailments can 
now travel safely 
from floor to floor. 
These elevators are 
neat, safe and quiet 
—they probably cost 
less than you think. 

INCLIN-ATOR 

Travels up and down 
stairs. Seats fold up 
when not in use. 
Carries one or two 
persons. 





ELEVETTE 

This passenger ele- 
vator fits in stair- 
well or other avail- 
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one to three per- 
sons. 

No overhead con- 
struction required. 
Operated by house 
current. Survey is 
free. 



Write or wire for full information 

MONARCH ELEVATOR 
& MACHINE CO., INC. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Manufacturers of 
Electric and Oil-Hydraulic Elevators 
Dumb- Waiters — Sidewalk Lifts 



ran down for a quick look at No. 2 
grandchild, and now things have 
quieted down in the Clein house- 
hold (except for 2 in the morning) 
for a while. 

Mr. and Mrs. Victor Bates re- 
port that the wedding of their son, 
Seymour to Miss Joyce Cohen of 
Petersburg was just as lovely as ex- 
pected. It took place in the Mar- 
shall Room of the John Marshall 
Hotel in Richmond, and Rabbi Ja- 
cob Milgrom of Richmond offici- 
ated. Louis Bates served as best 
man for his brother, and Mrs. Nor- 
man Silverman of New York was 
matron of honor. The couple will 
reside at 926 Hill Street upon their 
return from from their honeymoon. 
Lots of luck to both of you, and 
welcome to you, Mrs. Bates, from 
all of us. 

Sisterhood of Temple Emanuel 
held its first meeting on Monday, 
September 28th in the assembly 
room at the Temple. Committee re- 
ports were heard, and a program 
in the form of a sort of a cantata 
was heard. This described the be- 
ginnings and activities of Sister- 
hood, and Margie Camras, Ellen 
Cohen, Rita Weisler, Laura Wein- 
stien, Kay Stern, Dotty Rogers and 
Geri LeBrun participated. 

Hadassah held a tea for New 
Members at Temple Emmanuel in 
the assembly room. The program 
consisted of a wonderful talk by 
Rabbi Kling, coparing our past Ha- 
dassah presidents with prominent 
Israeli women. He then presented 
each past president with a pin. The 
program was most inspiring, and the 
refreshments, as always were deli- 
cious. 

Congratulations to Mimi and 
Julie Lerner, who named their baby 
in the Temple at the Succoth Serv- 
ice on Friday night, September 
25th. The Oneg Shabbat was 
lovely, and we were all happy to 




MRS. WILLIAM ELLIS ZUCKERMAN 
Hie former Sandra Schoenzeit, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Schoenzeit, 
of New York City, who was carried to William Ellis Zuckerman, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Isaac Zuckerman, of Greensboro, on August 15th. 



CLEO'S 
U. S. RESTAURANT 

FINE STEAKS — CHOPS — SEAFOOD 

465 Hay St. — Telephone 2-8457 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



"The Store of Service" 

W00TEN DRUG COMPANY 

Prescription Service 

1226 Fort Bragg Rd. — Telephone 3-1407 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



\1 



Want A Home? 

See 

FAYETTEVILLE 
REALTY SERVICE 

In 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 

Wilton Hunter — Jim Breswitz 



"Specializing in Personal Service" 

Bobbin's Cleaners 

REFRIGERATED STORAGE 
RUG CLEANING 

1333 Ramsey St. — Phone 2-8609 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



"We Serve the Best the 
Market Affords" 

Manhattan Restaurant 

"HOME" is Our Only Competitor 

Phone 2-5938 — Near Market House 
I 12 Gillespie St. Fayetteville, N. C. 



See 

Don Clayton 

for LIFE INSURANCE 
or MORTGAGE LOANS 

Our Policies Pay Big Dividends — 
Always Insist on Participating Insurance" 

Phone 3-1 187 — Bragg Blvd. 
Security Bldg. Fayetteville, N. C. 



Fire — Auto — Casualty — Hospital 

W. McK. Monroe, Jr. 

General Insurance 
1215 Hay St. — Dial 3-1658 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 

For Heating Oil 
DIAL 3-0407 

Tilden - Walker 
Marketer 

SINCLAIR PRODUCTS 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



RUG CLEANING 

tD3B 




DIAL 2-7127 tlW&o 851 BRAGG BLVD 

FAYETTEVILLE, N C 



Worth 

Business College 

Courses in 

Junior Accounting — Higher Accounting 
Stenography — Secretary 

123 Gillespie St.— Telephone 2-9154 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



meet Mimi's parents who were 
here for the occasion. 

Council held its first meeting on 
Tuesday, Oct. 5 at Temple Eman- 
uel. A program entitled "Council 
is a Girl's Best Friend" was pre- 
sented in which various committee 
chairmen described the work of 
their respective committees, and 
ended with a song. Those on the 
program were Joan Bluthcnthal, 
Hilda Weinstien, Joan Steele, Bar- 
bara Rothschild, Lena Krieger, 
Betsv LeBrun, Helen Levin, Rita 
Weisler, Margie Camos, and Clara 
Mac Friedlaender. 

The Temple Sisterhood is plan 
ning a bazaar to outdo all bazaars. 
It will start on an afternoon on 
December 3, which will be followed 
by a supper. On the 5th there will 
be a dinner, and the bazaar will fol- 
low. All activity will be held at Tem- 
ple Emanuel. Carol Lavietes, who 
heads the committee in charge, 
pormises big doings, detials of which 
will appear in the December issue. 

Words are inadequate to describe 
the beauty of our High Holy Day 
Services. Rabbi Kling, as usual, pre- 
sented excellent sermons, and Can- 
tor Mann was in superb form. Also, 
bouquets to our assistant cantor, 
Mr. Birnbaum of New York City, 
who did a fine job. . . . There was 
no let down in attendance during 
the entire Holiday, and our attend- 
ance at Friday night services con- 
tinues to grow. . . . Our new mem- 
bers have added much to our con- 
gregation, and in appreciation, our 
Membership Committee, consisting 
of Mrs. Robert (Hermine) Biller, 
Mrs. Harry (Helen) Skudin, and 
Mrs. George (Zelda) Breslau, had 
a beautiful Oneg Shabbat in their 
honor. . . . Here's to our ever grow - 
ing Beth David Family. . . . 

The first social affair of the year, 
our Post Yom Kippur dance, was a 
huge success, as was shown by the 
tremendous turn-out. Everyone and 
his friend was there, plus many of 
the college girls and boys. Music 
was furnished by Rex Bell's orches- 
tra, and refreshments were served 
during the evening. Jean Prago was 
chairman of the shindig, and Harrv 
Peake our capable master of cere- 
monies. . . . Recognition was given 
to Curt Frieberg as the outstand- 
ing member of the year; and to 
Rabbi Kling and Cantors Mann and 
Birnbaum for their wonderful con- 
tributions to the High Holy Day 
Services. . . . Several former mem- 
bers, now residing in other cities, 
came espeically to be with us. . . . 
Irene and George Black were in 
from Martinsville, Va. . . . Rene 



FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



NORTH CAROLINA'S OLDEST NEWSPAPER 
Established 1812 

THE FAYETTEVILLE OBSERVER 

"Et^ening Hours Are Reading Hours" 



For Your Every GLASS Need 
CALL 2-5414 

Distributors for L-O-F Quality Glass and Mirrors 




ESTABLISHED 1872 



mounts, to 

INCORPORATED 

Dunn Road — Highway 301 North 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



"We Serve The Best" 

NEW ROYAL RESTAURANT 

477 Hay St. Telephone 2-2385 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



"THROUGH SERVICE WE GROW" 

Veterans' Hospital - Esse Service 

AAA EMERGENCY SERVICE 
T. M. Piner, Proprietor 
2014 Ramsey St. Fayetteville, N. C. 



"Air Conditioning Our Specialty" 

Fayetteville Plumbing & Heating Co. 

3004 Fort Bragg Road Telephone 2-8330 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



A Good Place To Eat 

New York Restaurant 

226 Hay Street 
Serving Fayetteville, N. C. since 1932 



I 

j 129 Gillespie Street 

j 
f 



j PROCTOR-BARBOUR CO., INC. 

' Complete Line of Hardware 

j ♦ Hotpoint Appliances ♦ Farm Machinery j 



FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



Dial 3-2165 j 

i 



18 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



NEW BERN, N. C. 



H. J. IRELAND 

Commercial and Residential Electrical Contractors 

Dial 3092 :-: 1507 Rhem Ave. 

NEW BERN, N. C. 



C. H. STITH, Inc. 

. . General Insurance . . 



248 Craven Street 



NEW BERN, N. C. 



i 

Phone 2963 j 
I 



STALLINGS BROTHERS 

Plumbing and Heating — General Electric Heating 

Neuse Boulevard Phone 2977 

NEW BERN, N. C. 




COLEMAN MOTOR CO. 



229-31 Craven St. Telephone 3351 — 3452 

NEW BERN, N. C. 



NEW BERN BUILDING SUPPLY CO. 

Lumber — Ready Mixed Concrete — Concrete Blocks 
Roofing — Paints — Plaster — Windows — Doors 
Sand — Brick — and Other Building Materials 
DIAL 3143 

110 CRAVEN ST. NEW BERN, N. C. 



STEVENSON BRICK CO. 

Manufacturers of Concrete Products 

NEW BERN, N. C. 



Fred D. Williford, Pres. L. E. Williford, Vice-Pres. 
H. Edwards, Sec'y.-Treas. 

Williford Plumbing & Heating Co. 

Plumbing and Heating Contractors 



Box 192 



NEW BERN, N. C. 




Laddy Landau, son of Mrs. Harry Karesh, of Greensboro, N. C, is here pictured 
in Japan where he is a Sergeant in the Headquarters Company, 3rd Engineers 
Battalion, 3rd Marine Division of the U. S. Marines. 



and Leo Kaplan came from their 
home in Winston-Salem, and Ros- 
lyn and Alvin Cohen were here 
from Greenville, S. C. . . . Once a 
Beth David fan, always a Beth 
David fan. . . . We hope they, and 
many others, will continue to join 
us in our simchas. . . . 

It is with a great deal of sorrow 
that we saw the passing of our 
friend Abe Stadiem, and we wish to 
acknowledge, with much apprecia- 
tion, the many contributions given 
to Beth David Synagogue in his 
name. . . . Not only will he be 
missed by his relatives and friends, 
but we'll all miss his davening Fri- 
day evenings and Saturday morn- 
ings. . . . We extend our deepest 
sympathy to his family, and know 
that by the many good deeds he 
performed in life, his memory will 
remain forever alive. ... I know 
our entire congregation joins me in 
wishing a speedy recovery to our be- 
loved Rabbi Kagan, who has been 
ill at home these past few weeks; 
and to Eli Fein and Mr. Louis 
Steinberg who are hospitalized. 
Here's hoping to see them all up 
and about shortly. . . . 

I would be remiss if I failed to 
mention the terrific meeting of our 
Sisterhod during September. Mrs. 
Jack (Yvette) Pearlman, president, 
presided with much self-assurance at 
her first meeting, and launched us 



IVES 

OIL COMPANY 

Distributor 

SHELL GASOLINE 

Kerosene — Fuel Oil 

PHONE 2197 

Cypress St. 
NEW BERN, N. C. 



on what promises to be an outstand- 
ing year. Attendance was most out- 
standing, there being about 125 la- 
dies present. . . . One of the high- 
lights of the evening was a display 
of the Leagram booklets which 
our most capable chairman, Mrs. 
Blanca Rosenthal, has been making 
up. Leagrams, as you all know, are 
used as a money raising function of 
our Sisterhood. They are forms 
which can be used as greetings for 
anniversaries, condolences and notes 
of cheer. Ordinarily, messages are 
written and the sender's name at- 
tached to the form . . . but our 
chairman is no ordinary person, and 
by the time she has decorated the 
Leagram and printed the personal 
message, it is really a masterpiece. 
... It makes one quite anxious to 
be remembered with a Leagram. . . 
Our program chairman, Bea Gold- 
berg presented a delightful skit on 
Succoth, entitled A HOLIDAY ON 
PARADE, with the following cast: 
Blanche Lyon, Hermine Biller, 
Helen Skudin, Priscilla Feiner, Cele 
Levine, Shirley Kamenetz, Genie 
Jacobs, Esther Leader, Bea Gold- 
berg, Thelma Wise, Sylvia Bern- 
stein, Ruth Fields, Zelda Breslau, 
and Bea Karesh, who, in addition 
to being our pianist also directed 
the play. . . . Our talent was so 
outstanding we were immediately 
(Please Turn To Page 19) 



Thirst, Too, Seeks Oualitv 




NEW DERN 
Coca-Cola Bottling 
Company 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



19 



MORGANTON, N. C. 




BARRY LYNN ADLER 

Mr. and Mrs. Moses L. Adlcr 
celebrated the bar mitzvah of their 
son Barry Lynn, on September 4th 
and 5th at Temple Israel. Follow- 
ing the Friday night services a re- 
ception was held at the Temple. On 
Saturday evening a cake-cutting was 
held at the Adler home, at which 
time a cake, in the shape of a Star 
of David, was served. Those from 
out of town who attended included 
the grandparents of the bar mitzvah 
bov, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Robin- 
son, of Valdese, N. C, the Misses 
C. and B. Robinson, of Fairlawn, 
N. J., Mr. and Mrs. Louis Bloom, 
of Spartanburg, S. C, Mrs. Larrv 
Desmond, of Pine Top, N. C, B. 
W. Adler, of Asheboro, N. C, and 
Milton Adlcr, of Jacksonville, N. C. 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

TEMPLE BETH EL NEWS 

Mrs. Bert Raff, Correspondent 

The Temple Beth El Sisterhood 
held its first fund raising event of 
the new year. An elaborate "Side- 
walks of New York Bazaar" was 
given in the Temple vestry rooms 



MAXWELL 
COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 

Wholesale 
Merchants 

Dial 3191 

NEW BERN, N. C. . 



on October 18th which were appro- 
priately decorated to represent old 
New York. This successful affair 
was the result of the untiring efforts 
of the Sisterhood Ways and Means 
Chairman, Mrs. Howard Glazier. 

The Charlotte community mourns 
the passing of Mr. A. J. (Buster) 
Hirsch, son of Mr. and Mrs. David 
I. Hirsch, husband of Eleen Hirsch 
and father of Fred and Allen. "Bus- 
ter" was a former officer of Temple 
Beth El and was popularly known 
throughout the Carolinas for his 
manv Jewish endeavors and activi- 
ties. 

Norma Madalia, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. I. H. Madalia, has entered 
the freshman class at the University 
of Michigan. 

HADASSAH 

Mrs. Daniel S. Green, Correspondent 

To honor the new members of 
the Charlotte chapter of Hadassah, 
a luncheon meeting was held on 
Wednesday, September 23, 1953 in 
the social hall of Temple Israel. 

The president, Mrs. David Hoff- 
man, acquainted the new recruits to 
Hadassah with the scope of the or- 
ganization's work and briefed the 
old members on the group's tasks 
for the year ahead. 

The new members, 33 strong, 
were greeted and introduced indi- 
(Please Turn To Page 24) 



(Continued From Page 18) 

besieged with offers, but the only 
one we accepted was the one by our 
Congregation president, Mr. David 
Hclberg, who asked that we repeat 
our performance at the Congrega- 
tional meeting on October 18th. . . . 
Following the meeting, a beautiful 
Tea was given by onr Membership 
Committee. . . . Onr first Saturday 
night open house was held on Octo- 
ber 3rd, and was enjoyed by all. . . . 
Onr capable chairmen are Adolph 



"The Paper 
That Goes Home" 

THE SUN-JOURNAL 

NEW BERN, N. C. 



H. K. LAND & SON — Realtors 



205-6 Elks Temple Building 

NEW BERN, N. C. 



Dial 4251 



CITY LUMBER COMPANY 



j 



Lumber — Building Supplies 



\ 207 Queen Street 



Mill work 

Phone 2059 



NEW BERN, N. C. 



MACK L. LUPTON 

Packer of 

Lupton's 
"SUPREME PAC" 
Canned Goods 

NEW BERN, N. C. 



THE S. B. PARKER 
COMPANY 

Lennox — Aire-Flo Heating 

215-17 Craven Street 
Phone 3397 
NEW BERN, N. C. 



WILLIS FUNERAL 
HOME 

Established 1897 

Complete Funeral Service 
Ambulance Service 

226 Broad St. Phone 3210 

NEW BERN, N. C. 



eiTY LAUNDRY 

"The Soft Water Laundry" 

243 Fleet St. Dial 2991 

NEW BERN, N. C. 



W. C. CHADWICK 

General Insurance 
214 Mohn Building 

Phone 3146 
NEW BERN, N. C. 



It's the . . . 

GASTON 
HOTEL 

NEW BERN, N. C. 



| W. E. BAILEY PLUMBING and HEATING GO. j 



- i 

AROUND GREENSBORO \ 



I 



Contractors and Repairers I 

125 E. North Street Phone 2713 j 

KINSTON, N. C. i 



' ▼ ▼ T T T"T 



HOWELL 
Plumbing Co. 

Plumbing Contracting 
and Repairs 

ESTIMATES GIVEN GLADLY 
All Work Guaranteed 

Day or Night Service 
Dial 5211 

421 Broad 
NEW BERN, N. C. 



Use Farm Tested 

Dixie 
Fertilizers 

manufactured by 

DIXIE 

CHEMICAL CORP. 



First Citizens Bank & Trust Company 

Your Good Neighbor 

Established 1898 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
NEW BERN, NORTH CAROLINA 



) | 

! For Dividends and Dollars I 



I 



I NEW BERN, N. C. I 

i i 



20 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



KBNSTON, N. C. 



Member F. D. I. C. 



Member Federal Reserve System 



KINSTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



Carolina Building Supply Co* 

of Kinston, N. C. 

Building Material Mill Work 

Everything for Your Building Needs 
1410 W. Vernon Ave. Dial 4681 

KINSTON, N. C. 



f 

j Sales 
f 

i 



Distributors of SHELL Products 
Dial 3127 for FUEL OILS 

MARTIN FUEL & SUPPLY CO. 

KINSTON, N. C. 



PATE K-F MOTORS 




Sales 



Service 




207 S. Heritage Dial 5953 
KINSTON, N. C. 



Midyette Hardware Co. 

BUILDING MATERIALS 

lienjamin Moore Paints — Flintkote Roofing Materials 

11 N. Queen St. Dial 3742 

KINSTON, N. C. 



Commercial National Bank 

The Home-Owned Bank 



IDEAL DRY CLEANERS 

"All That the Name Implies" 
# Alterations — Draperies — Slip-Covers — Blankets 
HATS CLEANED AND BLOCKED 
12 Hour Service ■ — Call for and Delivery Service 

102 W. Peyton St. KINSTON, N. C. Dial 3467 



CAROLINA MOTORS ! 

De-Soto - Plymouth Service j 

White Trucks j 

Dial 5251 for 24-Hour Wrecker Service I 

605 N. Heritage KINSTON, N. C. Dial 3128 [ 

I 

- SAL ^ g & ~ SE £y ICE £5 " J 

E. F. SMALLWOOD, Proprietor 
PLUMBING & HEATING CONTRACTOR 

Coleman Products — Easy Washing Machines — Hot Point Appliances 

325 South Front Street Dial 3132 

NEW BERN, N. C. 



Guyes, Jack Pearlman and Harry 
Karesh, who promise some bang-up 
affairs. . . . Have a free Saturday 
evening? — join us in the Beth David 
Lounge for an evening of cards, 
bingo, scrabble, or what you will. . . . 

Off to the conference of our Na- 
tional Women's League, which took 
place at Old Point Comfort, Va., 
went Bea Karesh and Priscilla 
Feiner; eBa as Regional Vice-presi- 
dent, and Priscilla as Vice-president 
of our local chapter. Yvette Pearl- 
man, our president, was also going, 
but circumstances at home forced 
her to forego that wonderful oppor- 
tunity. . . . Can't wait to hear all the 
details at our next Sisterhood Meet- 
ing. . . . 

Our Sisterhood Carnival which 
was to take place October 17th 
was postponed to October 24th. . . 
There were the usual games of 
chance: bingo, white elephant, food 
booth, etc., etc. . . . Another com- 
ing event is our Thanksgiving 
Dance, which, this year, will take 
place at Starmount Country Club 
on November 22nd. . . . Save the 
date. . . . Our Hazimrah Group 
(Beth David's Music Club) is 
planning another fine concert for 
December. If you attended the mu- 
sicale last year, you know what a 
treat is in store for you. . . . More 
details will come later. . . . Beth 
David Men's Club met for its first 
meeting of the year on Thursday 
evening, October 6th, and installed 
Lewis Myers as President. . . Good 
luck Lew ... we know that with 
the cooperation promised by your 



membership you'll have an out- 
standing year. . . . 

That's all for now folks ... so 
here's wishing you a month of good 
health, and plenty of activity. . . . 
Busy hands are happy hands . . . 
and don't forget FRIDAY NIGHT 
IS SYNAGOGUE NIGHT FOR 
THE ENTIRE FAMILY. 

KINSTON, N. C. 




MARILYN JANICE TOLOCHKO 

Rabbi and Mrs. Jerome G. To- 
lochko of Kinston, N. C, announce 
the engagement of their daughter, 
Marilyn Janice, to Mr. Sol Shapiro, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Sha- 
piro of Freehold, N. J. Miss To- 
lochko is a 1952 graduate of the 
Woman's College in Greensboro 
and is now employed in the adver- 
tising department of Rich's, Inc. in 
Atlanta, Georgia. A December 12th 
wedding is planned. 




Plumer Daniels Plumbing and Heating Go 

< CONTRACTORS 




116 E. Peyton 



Repairing a Specialty 



KINSTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



Phone 3728 



Roofing & Sheet 
Metal Contractors 

VENTILATORS 
LENNOX FURNACES 

Winter and Summer 
Air-Conditioning 

E. L. SCOTT 

514 E. Vernon Ave. 
Dial 21 10 
KINSTON, N. C. 



George 
Dubose 

General 
Contractor 

KINSTON, N. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 

\ PLAIN TALK 

J By AL SEGAL 



HmniimimmmimiiiiiMiiimmmmiiimiiiiimngiimiHmmmmimimuiHimmiit 

| FRED C. GARDNER | 

'£ : General Contractor = 

| COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL BUILDING 

= Loftin Building Dial 4712 = 

| KINSTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

3~^!llligiilllllllillMII9i!!illlllllllllllllilllllllllllll!lllllllllllllllilillllllllll!IIIIIII!i!llilll!iT 



MASSEY MOTOR COMPANY 

Sales CADILLAC Service 
Sales # OLDSMOBILE # Service 

DIAL 2810 KINSTON, N. C. 



WHITE OWL AUTO PARTS CO. 

We Specialize in Parts for 
MILITARY AND WILLYS VEHICLES 

Goldsboro Highway Dial 5215 

KINSTON, N. C. 



I 



CI aytor's Tin Shop 



WINTER AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS 

Sheet Metal Work— Roofing — Tinners 
Dial 3833 116 W. King St. 

KINSTON, N. C. ' i 

m 



JOHNSON-GRAVES MOTOR CO., Inc. 

Sales —p^ffl — Service 

"Quality Is Remembered Long After Price Is Forgotten' 

203 West Blount Street Dial 2553 

KINSTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



A gentleman sends — by way of 
his great indignation — a sheaf of 
anti-Semitic pamphlets. I don't in- 
tend to dignify them either by men- 
tioning their titles or their contents. 
Thev go into my wastebasket 
whence thev will eventually be 
transported to the city's incinerator 
with all other garbage. 

My wastebasket is the frequent 
repository of outgivings from crazy 
people who send me letters in my 
function as columnist on the daily 
press. So, yesterday, these anti-Se- 
mitic pamphlets joined the writings 
of other screwballs, to use an expres- 
sion, in this wastebasket. 

There these pamphleteers could 
meet the one who had written that 
women ought to be segregated from 
the human race as dangerous char- 
acters; another letter that said tele- 
vision was something of the devil's 
own invention and quoted Scripture 
to prove it; still another letter that 
suggested I should support a move- 
ment to put down supermarkets 
which the writer said are a menace 
to America, like the Reds. 

In a wav 1 felt sorry for the de- 
ranged authors of the pamphlets, as 
I am for all people with diseases of 
the mind. And what's psychiatry 
doing for them? 1 asked. 

I had seen psychiatrists doing so 
beneficently in our town for people 
caught in acts of being crazy: The 
aging person who recently had mo- 
lested a child had been taken in 
hand by psychiatrists. That person 
who had tortured his own boy had 
been put under psvchiatric study to 
determine how a father gets that 
way and what to do about him. 

Why not the same kind of medi- 
cal treatment for these wretched 
persons who become anti-Semites 



FIRST-CITIZENS 
BANK & TRUST CO. 

Established 1898 




Complete Banking and 
Trust Facilities 

Dial 4181 

200 North Queen St. 
KINSTON, N.'C. 



bv profession? A course of such 
treatment might help to bring them 
around toward being normal hu- 
mans again — people safe for other 
human beings to associate with. The 
professional anti-Semite — like those 
who wrote these pamphlets — could 
turn out to be characters more men- 
acing than the fellow who molested 
the child. 

So I don't try to answer their 
pamphlets, any more than I would 
think of getting into an argument 
with the crazy person who wants all 
women segregated. To quarrel with 
the mentally deranged is only to 
encourage them, and besides, it isn't 
self-respecting. 

All this brings me to this thesis- 
Aren't the Jewish self-defense agen- 
cies on the wrong track. They han- 
dle anti-Semitic groups as if thev 
were responsible - minded people. 
Don't the} dignify them too much 
when they quarrel with them instead 
of setting them m their proper place 
as sick-minded individuals and or- 
ganizations. 

Onlv the other dav 1 handled such 
a person. He was no anti-Semite 
bent on doing away with the Jews; 
his purpose was to do away with a 
lady who had done him wrong. He 
had come to mv desk to announce 
that he was on the way to her apart- 
ment to shoot her; he was telling 
me this with the idea that I, as 
newsman, would report the whole 
story in. the press, and give his side 
of it, after the lady was dead. 

You don't argue with people like 
him; it's no use to argue, anyway. 
Instead I managed to get awav from 
mv desk long enough to tell a col- 
league to call a cop. The police 
were promptlv on hand and took 
the fellow off to be examined bv 

(Please Turn To Page 33) 



Quinn & Miller 

1 QUALITY FURNITURE 

Reasonably Priced 

KINSTON, N. C. 



KAY'S 

MEN'S STORE 

107 N. Queen St., Tel. 3063 
KINSTON, N. C. 



G. W. CARTER 
TILE CO. 

Authorized Sun-Tile Dealer 

502 E. Vernon St. Dial 3587 
KINSTON, N. C. 



CAROLINA 

DAIRY CORP. 

-♦- 

GRADE "A" 
PASTEURIZED MILK 
CREAM ICE CREAM 

Prompt Courteous Delivery 

-♦- 

W. Vernon Ave. 
Dial 41 13 & 41 14 
KINSTON, N. C. 



AUNT JENNIE'S 
BAKE SHOP 

FRENCH BREAD 
CAKES— PIES— ROLLS 

813 N. Queen St. Phone 4611 
KINSTON, N. C. 



p KINSTON TIRE CO. 

I; General Tires and Tubes 

I; KRAFT SYSTEM 

j; RECAPPING 

Factory Controlled 

'[ 204 E. Caswell Dial 3580 

I 1 KINSTON, N. C. 



22 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 




;iilf?ipiiiipf 




3j||jH|tF 



4 



... >>i 



Wis 
111 




BENJ. M. SASLAW 



5301 - 5315 Wythe Avenue, Richmond, Virginia 

WE RAISE THE CURTAIN . . . 

AND SALUTE PASKOW and SASLAW 

Builders and General Contractors of these Fine Homes. Paskow and 
Saslav accomplished this marvelous achievement with the vision and 
understanding of the modern person who wants the opportunity "to 
live to-day in to-day's manner". They created the rich man's home 
while satisfying the lesser sized purse. 



Atlantic 
Electrical 
Supply Corp, 

Distributors of 
Electrical Supplies and 
Lighting Fixtures 

RICHMOND 19, VA. 



PASKOW and SASLAW 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
and BUILDERS of FINE HOMES 



ISIDOR PASKOW 

4203 Monument Ave. 
Dial 84-6440 



BENJAMIN M. 
SASLOW 

4405 Monument Ave. 
Dial 84-2740 



OLIVER 



ELECTRICAL 
CONTRACTORS 

1517 W. Main St. 
RICHMOND, VA. 
Phone 65682 



A.E.TATE = 
Lumber Co., Inc. 

Rough and Dressed 
Lumber 

100 East Belt Boulevard 
Telephone 82-5654 



It fr| lis T • | 








Authorized Dealer M 

GENERAL @ ELECTRIC 

1 5903 WEST BROAd" STREET— DIAL 5-7451 1 


R 1 llliliioj !3 




rfjf» WiftMl HTtl i I* 


liPlillif 



Plumbing & Heating Contractors ah Kinds of 



Plumbing Installations 



R. M. 0RCUTT 

2514 Hull St. 

Over 22 Years Experience In 

ROOFING 



Dial 
Tvichmond 



• Work Guaranteed 

• Free Estimates 



W. F. Weiler Co. 

• Specialists in Home 

• Insulation 

802 Brook Hill Circle 
Phone 4-4543 



Congratulations on a fine job! 

AND, for more fine jobs, 
Dial 84-3261 





1801-07 West Leigh Street, Richmond, Va 
Headquarters for Building Materials of all Kinds 



CLARENCE C. 
FRIEND 

Master Plasterer 
Prompt Service 

2205 N. 26th St. 

Dial 2-9281 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



23 



I ■ 

4Sg 





^OIIillliiiMiil 

Si 



5300 - 5314 Wythe Avenue, Richmond, Virginia 

WE ALSO SALUTE THEIR # 

ASSOCIATES, SUB-CONTRACTOR AND FIRMS 

Listed on these two pages that helped achieve this wonderful project. 
Only with their fine labor, the best materials, and products that went 
into the building of these homes could such fine results have been had. 
Without their efforts this could not have been accomplished. 




ISIDOR PASKOW 




REYNOLDS 

and DAY... 

1015 Taylor Ave. 

Painting & Decorating 

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR 
REASONABLE RATES 

From 8 to 5 — 82-5967 
H. G. Reynolds R. L. Day 
5-6289 




See them now in 
our display room! 

New 




In Sturdy Steel 



A. R. Tiller, Corp. 

959 Myers St. Tillerphone 5-7401 



Martin Tile 
& Marble Co. 

W. H. Martin, Owner 

301 North Robinson St. 
Telephone 6-7698 



A. S. MORRISON 

Sanding & Finishing 

FLOORS 

Old Floors Made Like New 

Route 2, Box 189-B 
ELLERSON, VA. 
Dial 98-3766 



BENDER 

VENETIAN BLINDS 



422 W. BROAD ST. 
DIAL RICHMOND 

7-2994 



© Manufacturers of the Finest Quality 

• Custom - Made Venetian Blinds 
© Steel or Flexalum Slats 

• Free Estimates Mail Orders Promptly Filled 



BANCROFT 

CONCRETE 
CONTRACTOR 

Dial 84-4397 

3019 Chamberlayne Avenue 
RICHMOND, VA. 



GEORGE E. 
ROYAL 

• BRICK 

• CONTRACTOR 

207 E. Broad Rock Rd. 
Dial 83-0263 



"Building Confidence With Quality Building Supplies" 

Massey Builders' Supply Corporation 

OFFICES: 3700-3712 WEST BROAD STREET 
PHONE 5-8335 

RICHMOND 21, VA. 
© Patent Steel Scaffold © Ready Mix Concrete 

© Rent or Sale • Gleem Paints 



PASKOW & SASLAW 

Wish to take this opportunity 
to thank all the Firms for their 
graciousness in sponsoring these 
pages in our behalf. It has 
been our pleasure to work with 
them in building these fine 
Homes. 



24 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



MOORE'S ANTIQUE SHOP 

Antiques — Beautiful Fabrics — Upholstering 
Restoring 

Reproducers of Fine Hand Made Period Furniture 



146 Howard Street 



ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



Phone 2-1298 



Save With Safety 

ALMAND'S DRUG STORE 

The Prescription Store 

130 South Main Street ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



H. H. Strandberg, President 



M. W. Ivey, Secretary-Treasurer 



Standard Insurance & Realty Company 

Insurance — Real Estate — Rentals 
PHONE 6156 ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



SULLIVAN A ' r ^° fl< * l * l0nifl 9 Corporation 

DISTRIBUTORS 
/OorK\ Headquarters for Mechanical Cooling 
WXs) AIR CONDITIONING— WARM AIR HEATING 
v ~^~ ICE-MAKING EQUIPMENT 

223 S. Main St. ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. Phone 2-2928 



NORTH STATE MOTOR LINES. Inc. 

Tobacco, Agricultural Commodities and 
Shelled Corn HAULING our Specialty 

All Cargoes Fully Insured Infra- and Inter-State Hauling 

1301 Raleigh Rd. ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. Dial 2-4108-9 



J. S. Gorham Hardware Company, Inc. 



! 239 Tarboro Street 



Phone 8119 



ROCKY MOUNT, NORTH CAROLINA 



Shaver Battery & Auto Parts Company 

Ignition Parts — Carburetors 
Briggs & Stratton Engines — Delco Batteries 

210 Hill Street Dial 6145 

ROCKY MOUNT, NORTH CAROLINA 



ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 

Mrs. Kenneth Berk, Correspondent 



It was so nice to share the break- 
ing of the fast on Yom Kippur with 
so many of our out-of-town friends. 
The recreation room adjoining our 
Temple was so lovely with fall flow- 
ers and fruit compotes decorating 
the set tables. Thanks so much to 
Mrs. Jake Rosenbloom, Mrs. Oscar 
Levy, Mrs. Ted Levy, Mrs. Kenneth 
Berk, Mrs. Herbert Fuerst who did 
the cooking and serving as well to 
the others who donated their time 
and efforts to help make it such a 
success. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Berk of Mi- 
ami Beach, Fla., arc the guests of 
their so nand daughter-in-law, Mr. 
and Mrs. Kenneth Berk. 



Mr. Louis Raskin entertained at 
a lovely dinner party at the Hilma 
Country Club in honor of his wife, 
Bess's birthday. Many happy returns 
to you, Bess. 

The first meeting of the Beth-El 
Sisterhood was held on Wednesday, 
Sept. 23, in the Temple Recreation 
Room. Many plans were made, and 
all are looking forward to a very 
active Social Season in Roclcy 
Mount. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Kouzel of 
Washington, D. C. were guests of 
Mrs. Kouzel's parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
O. Levy during the Rosh Hashonah 
Holidays. 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

(Concluded From Page 19) 

vidually in a special welcoming 
ceremony by Mrs. Dan Retchin, 
membership chairman, and her 
committee, consisting of Mrs. Leon 
Greenberg, Mrs. Lee Kritzer, Mrs. 
I. C. Kurtz and Mrs. J. Levin. 

A feature of the program was the 
presentation of an original play 
written by Mrs. }. Goldstein and 
Mrs. M. Cohen entitled "I Am A 
Camera" and telling the story of 
Hadassah's work in Israel. The play- 
ers were Mrs. N. Sutker, Mrs. B. 
Richter, Mrs. L. Sleslinger, Mrs. H. 
Swimmer, Mrs. S. Wallace and Mrs. 
P. Gottlieb. Master Max Brown- 
stein played the role of the child. 
Vocal selections were given by Mrs. 
L. Kritzer and Mrs. S. Levine. 

Hostess Chairman, Mrs. Nat 
Roberts and her committee were in 
charge of luncheon arrangements 
and tabic decorations. 



Do It Now! Buy That 
Israel Bond! 



ALLAN MIMS, Inc. 




Authorized Sales and 
Service 

Telephone 2-2191 

225 Tarboro Street 

ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



Hadassah's Women 
Of Glory 

(Concluded From Page 6) 

Hadassah living. I think, for a mo- 
ment, of Israel's Minister of Labor, 
Golda Meyerson — the woman who 
represents Israeli women in the 
Cabinet, who works quietly and ef- 
ficiently to solve the practical prob- 
lems of Israeli life. Hadassah is de- 
voted to practical problems rather 
than to philosophical theories: it 
builds hospitals, trains nurses and 
doctors, rescues youth, rehabilitates 
them. And your president, in her 
own softspoken way, works efficient- 
ly and ably to see that Greensboro 
does its share. I am happy to pre- 
sent this pin to Mrs. Julius Smith. 

To all of them and to all of you 
— mazel tow If the past ten years 
have been good ones, have been 
years of accomplishment, your lead- 
ers deserve mazel tov and thanks. 
May all of you together now make 
the next ten even more fruitful and 
even more exciting — and thus you 
will do your share in bringing about 
the complete redemption of our 
people wherever they be. 



Take Home 




COCA-COLA BOTTLING 

CO., Inc. 

*/ 

ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



25 



GREENSBORO JEWISH COMMUNITY CALENDAR g 



(IIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlll|||ll9!lllllll!Egiili![ 



21— Hadassah— 2:00 P. 
28— Temple Sisterhood- 



September 

M. — Temple 
-12:30 P. M.— Temple 



October 

5 — Council of Jewish Women — 2:15 P. M. — Temple 

6 — Hadassah Study Group — 10 :30 A. M. — Homes 
10 — 12 — Mid-Atlantic Conference and 

N.F.T.S., District 8— Cumberland, Md. 

12— B'nai B'rith— 8:00 P. M.— Beth David 

13 — Hadassah Study Group — 10 :30 A. M.— Homes 

18 — Dedication of Chapel — Hillel House — Chapel Hill 

19— Hadassah— 8:00 P. M.— Beth David 
Temple Brotherhood— 6 :30 P. M.— Temple 

20— Hadassah Study Group — 10 :30 A. M. — Homes 

24— Beth David Carnival— 8 :00 P. M.— Beth David 

26— Council Board Meeting — 10:30 A. M. 
Congregational Meeting — 6:30 P. M. — Temple Emanuel 
Beth David Sisterhood — Beth David 

27— Hadassah Study Group— 10:30 A. M.— Homes 

November 

2 — Council of Jewish Women — 2:15 P. M. 

4 — Hadassah Study Group — 10:30 A. M. 
9— Temple Sisterhood— 12 :30 P. M.— Temple 

B'nai B'rith— 8:00 P. M. 

10 — Hadassah Study Group — 10:30 A. M.— Homes 

11 — Council Study Group — 10:30 A. M. 
16— Hadassah— 1 :00 P. M.— Temple 

18— Council Study Group— 10:30 A. M. 
(continued) 

23 — Temple Brotherhood — 6:30 P. M. — Temple 

25— Council Study Group— 10 :30 A. M. 
30 — Council Board Meeting 

December 

3 — Temple Sisterhood Bazaar and dinner — Temple 

5 — Temple Sisterhood Bazaar and dinner — Temple 

6 — Hanukah Part — Beth David 

7 — Inter-Faith Program, Council and 2 Sisterhoods — 8 :00 P. M. 

13 — Beth David Congregational Meeting 

14— Temple Sisterhood— 12 :30 P. M.— Temple 

19— Hadassah Sabbath (tentative)— 8 : 00 P. M.— Beth David 

28— Council Board— 10 :30 A. M. 

January 

4 — Council of Jewish Women — 2:15 P. M. 

11 — B'nai B'rith — 8:00 P. M. 

12— Temple Sisterhood Study 

18— Hadassah— 12 :30 P. M.— Temple 

19 — Temple Sisterhood Study 

25 — Council Board — 10:30 A. M. 

Beth David Sisterhood — Beth David 

Temple Emanuel Cong. Meeting — 6 :30 P. M. — Temple 

26 — Temple Sisterhood Study Group 

February 

1 — Council of Jewish Women — 2:15 P. M. 

8— Temple Sisterhood— 12 :30 P. M.— Temple 
B'nai B'rith— 8:00 P. M. 

13— B.B.G. Valentine Dance 

15— Hadassah— 1 :00 P. M.— Beth David 

21 — Hazimrah — Beth David 

22— Council Board 

25 — Temple Brotherhood — 6:30 P. M. — Temple 

March 

1 — Council of Jewish Women — 2:15 P. M 
8— B'nai B'rith— 8:00 P. M. 

12— Sisterhood Sabbath— 8:00 P. M.— Beth David 

14 — Beth David Congregational Meeting — Beth David 

15— Hadassah— 8:00 P. M.— Temple 

19 — Sisterhood Sabbath — 8:00 P. M. — Temple 

20— Purim Party— 8:00 P. M.— Beth David 

29 — Council Board — 10 :30 A. M. 

Temple Brotherhood— 6 :30 P. M.— Temple 
(Please Turn To Page 33) 




3% "INSURED" SAVINGS 

First Federal Savings 
& Loan Association 



ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 
nllllllllllllliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillilllci: 



ARTCRAFT GLASS 
COMPANY 

Mirrors Resilvered 
GLASS and MIRRORS 

131 S. Church St. Dial 2-2851 
ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 

Flake B. Chipley, Inc. 

Sales and Service 
118 N. Church St. 
Tel 2-1550 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 




Dillon-Goldston 
Implement Co. 

FARM EQUIPMENT 

821 S. Church St. Ph. 2-2151 
ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



R0GKY MOUNT 
AIR SERVICE 

Flight Instruction 
Charter Flights 

ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



G. A. 
WILKINSON 

Incorporated 

General Agent 

FIRE AND ALLIED 
LINES 

I 1 8 Sunset Avenue 
ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 



The GASTONIA 

MILL SUPPLY COMPANY 

DISTRIBUTORS OF 

INDUSTRIAL, TEXTILE, ELECTRICAL, 
PLUMBING SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT 

613 East Franklin Ave. Telephone 5-3491 

GASTONIA, N. C. 



Southern Dairies 

"Get the Best- Get Sealtest" 




ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 




ANYTHING IN TEXTILE REPLACEMENT PARTS 



Speeder Parts 
Bobbin Gears 
Split Gears 
Coupling Gears 
Compound Gears 
Chain Drives 
Spiral Gears 
Cone Belts 
Comb Blades 



Shop and 
Office at 
ARLINGTON 
HEIGHTS 



Winder Parts 
Spinning Parts 

Card Parts 
Drawing Parts 
Comber Parts 
Roller Chain Sprockets 
Silent Chain Sprockets 
V-Belts 
Lickerin Belts 



Ball Bearing Comb Boxes — Ball Bearing Units 
HOBS, CUTTERS & REAMERS SHARPENED 

Textile Parts & Machine Co., Inc. 

Phone 

P. O. Box 2615 8564 GASTONIA. N. C. 



26 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



WILSON, N. C. 



RACKLEY 
BROTHERS 




P. O. Box 365 State License No. 1156 

WILSON, N. C. 



REECE DEANS - Plumbing-Heating 

We Install — We Repair — We Service 
ESTIMATES GIVEN 
Dial 5100 

231 S. Goldsboro Street WILSON, N. C. < 



i 

j 104 N. Douglas St. 



Interior Decorating 

WILSON, N. C. 



Dial 5969 



121 South Douglas Street 
' WILSON, N. C. 



W. M. WIGGINS & CO. 

Plumbing and Heating Contractors 
DEALERS FOR ELECTRIC BOILERS 

606 Pender St. Dial 2891 

WILSON, N. C. 



WADE D. BARNES INTERIORS ! 



! Sheet Metal Works, Paints, All Kinds Roofing & Supplies \ 

| DANIEL ROOFING SUPPLIES, Inc. \ 



Dial 2346 j 
I 



miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiisiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiisiii 




for 



WILSON, N. C. 

Mrs. Nathan Shor, Correspondent 



To all our neighboring friends we 
extend our heartfelt invitation to 
join with us on November 8th, the 
dedication of Temple Beth El. 

Rabbi Arthur Lellvvcld will be 
the guest of the evening. Those of 
us that have experienced a message 
given by him need no reminder. So 
let us reserve this date for Wilson's 
dynamic event and enjoy together 
with pride another momentous oc- 
casion long to be remembered. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Goldmg arc 
the proud grandparents of a little 
girl born to Mr. and Mrs. Michael 
Lax of New York City. The Little 



Miss has accepted the lovely name 
of Jennipher. 

Little Michael Robert Dere en- 
tered this wonderful world on the 
eve of Rosh Hashona; son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Emil B. Dere of Rich- 
mond. The proud grandparents are 
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Shor of Wil- 
son. 

An Aneg Shcbat was given bv the 
Shors on September 11th to honor 
this wonderful occasion along with 
the engagement of their daughter, 
Arlene Marcia, to Doctor Donald }. 
Stiles of Richmond. Joyous songs 
were sung by the guests and led by 
Rabbi Weiss. 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



Mrs. Celia Golden 
The first Hadassah and B'nai 
Israel Sisterhood meetings had a 
grand attendance and everybody 
seem filled with ideas for the sea- 
son's fund raising activities. It's 
simply wonderful how the cooler 
weather brings out the "old ambi- 
tion" again. 

Hadassah had a Membership Tea 
and Card Party to follow for the 
ladies that could stay and Airs. Rob- 
ert Bcrman promised some fine sur- 
prises for future meetings and the 
forthcoming Smorgasboard, which 
is an annual Hadassah affair for 
raising funds. It wasn't long bf fore 
Norma kept her word and after at- 
tending the recent Symposium in 
Fayetteville that Hadassah held for 
Youth Aliyah and H. M. O. Norma 
invited Mrs. Joseph Hammerman to 
hold forth before an opening meet- 
ing at the Covenant Club on Oc- 
tober 8th so the community could 
get a more concise picture of the 
outstanding work being done in the 
Israeli hospitals. 

Mrs. Hammerman is one of the 
most spellbinding speakers we've 



= I 

= i 
= i 
= i 
= i 
= i 
= i 
§ i 



For 

GOODness' 
*' 5 Sake! 




j 



1 TRUCK and SCHOOL BUS BODIES 1 I 

| Hackney Bros. Body Co. 1 | 

| WILSON, N. C. PHONE 2141 | j 

1 ■ : ] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ; i a 1 1 i ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 j; 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 » 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Tl I 



j "The 
j Reg. 



Mello Fellow" 
U. S. Pat. Off. 




, Correspondent 

heard in a long time and we liter- 
ally lived her experiences with her 
in the retelling of the marvelous 
work she had witnessed personallv 
in the operating rooms. The reha- 
bilitation centers are doing equallv 
as superb a job and before the night 
was over, Hadassah had raised 1,200 
dollars to help further this most 
necessary work. May Mrs. Ham- 
merman meet with much success al- 
ways in the life she has dedicated 
herself to do! 

Of course, nothing takes prece- 
dent over the annual Carnival Sis- 
terhood has when the adults enjoy 
a srollicking a good time as the 
small fry. That comes off in late 
November. 

Better late than never they say, 
so here's a great Mazeltov to Mr. 
and Mrs. Murray Simon on the 
birth of their third child. Barbara 
Ann was born June 25, and has a 
little brother Michael and older sis- 
ter, Wendy Marcia. The Simon's 
are newly arrived from New York — 
best of luck to the family. Mr. Si- 
mon is with the Southern Iron and 
Metals Co. in Wilmington. 



FLOORS 

Are Our Business 

• SURFACED 

• REFINISHED 

• POLISHED 

INLAID LINOLEUM 
WALL COVERING 
ASPHALT TILE 

J. B. Ellis & Co. 

For Free Estimates 
Dial 4487 

406 Pender Street 
WILSON, N. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



27 



LYNCHBURG, VA. 



(Concluded 

families of Lynchburger kin. Mar- 
tha Rosenberg, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Julius Davis, gave birth to her 
third child, a daughter in San Fran- 
cisco, California. Martha's husband 
is nice looking and congenial Dr. 
Milton Rosenberg. 

In nearby Roanoke, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ralph Katz have announced the ar- 
rival of their first born. You may 
know Mrs. Katz as the forma Dora 
Heller. 

Ronald Feinman, Jr. is the name 
given to the infant son of Lt. and 
Mrs. Edward Feinman born in New 
Roper Hospital, Charleston. 

Airman 3-C Stanley Lictenstein 
spent a 30 day leave with his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Sylvan Lichten- 
stein, prior to shipment to the Far 
East. 

First visitors entertained by Mr. 
and Mrs. Al Scheckwitz in their at- 
tractive new home were AFs sister 
and daughter. Family and friends 
mixed gaily at the Scheckwitz open 
house. Newlyweds Mr. and Mrs. 
Irving Fein were on hand and so 
were the handsome couple Dena n' 
Lou — Mrs. Gertrude Katz of Roa- 
noke was a charming person with 
whom I chatted. The Elliot Schew- 
els whose home is near completion 
will be neighbors of Mr. and Mrs. 
Scheckwitz. 

Wonderful Autumn time — crack- 
lin' leaves, crunchy apples, harvest 
festival and Succoth. "The Feast of 
Tabernacles" was observed by mem- 
bers of Agudath Sholom Temple at- 



THOMAS- 

YELVERTON 
COMPANY 



From Page ] 3) 

tending services. A beautiful display- 
was constructed at the Temple by 
the Sisterhood Committes com- 
posed of Mrs. Edward Goldstein, 
Mrs. Mose Feinman, Mrs. W. J. 
Bank and Mrs. Melvin Lichten- 
stein. 

Other Lynchburgers travelling 
around are Mrs. Simon Alper and 
children who were in Philadelphia 
— Back here is Macy Rosenthal 
after a sojourn home. Dr. Dave 
Amowitz attended a dental conven- 
tion in Roanoke. 

Lynchburger's hearts and sympa- 
thies were extended to Mrs. Henry 
Ross on the passing of her mother. 

The family of Mrs. Fannie Adler 
wish to thank all their friends and 
acquaintances for their kind show 
of sympathy on the passing of Mrs. 
Adler's mother, Mrs. Ida Simon. 

The Lynchburg branch of the 
Needle- Work Guild was organized 
through the churches and has 674 
members. Mrs. Kenneth Cooper 
has been appointed secretary. Direc- 
tor and Section chairman for Tem- 
ple Agudath Sholom is, Mrs. Rae 
Schewel. Lending their efforts were 
Ruth Sybil Greif, Etta Lichtenstein, 
Shirley Levin and Rae Schewel. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben Schewel made 
merry on their wedding anniversar- 
ies at The Marshalls in Virginia 
Beach. 

Mrs. Hugo Bloomfield of Lexing- 
ton, Ky., a national executive mem- 
ber is expected to appear and speak 
at a luncheon meeting for Sister- 
hood. 

The palms decorating the Syna- 
gogue for the High Holy Days were 
donated by Mr. Samuel Dickerson 
of Park Avenue Flower Shop. 



WILSON, N. C. 



SINCLAIR 
REFINING CO. 

OIL PRODUCTS 

613 Mercer St. Phone 3516 

WILSON, N. C. 



R. F. BELAND 
Plumbing & Heating 
CONTRACTOR 
Service - - Supplies 

220 E. Barnes St. Dial 3927 
WILSON, N. C. 




ARLENE FAY SPANDORFER 

Miss Spandorfer, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Reuben E. Spandorfer, has be- 
come engaged to Maxwell E. Feinman, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Feinman, 
also of Lynchburg. 



National Bank 
of Wilson 

Complete 
Banking Service 

Membar 
Federal Reserve System 
Member Federal Deposit 
Insurance Corporation 

WILSON, N. C. 



Linville's 

Inc. 

Ready Mixed 
CONCRETE 

Quality 
CONCRETE BLOCKS 

Dial 4636 or 6052 

S. Park Ave. Ext. 
WILSON, N. C. 



GEORGE H. BARNES TIN SHOP 5 



"Your I 



our iron fireman 



Deo/e 



SHEET METAL ROOFING 
HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING 



212 S. Lodge St. 



WILSON, N. C. Dial 4146 



Carolina Laundry & Cleaners, Inc. 

Dial 2164 — A Service for Every Family 
SANITONE DRY CLEANING 
Modern Garment Storage 
237 S. TARBORO ST. WILSON, N. C. 



Gem Rock Wool Insulating Co., Inc. 

Franchised Dealers 
JOHNS-MANVILLE BLOWN ROCK WOOL 
INGERSOLL KOOL SHADE SUN SCREEN 



Phone 2932 



WILSON 



National Bank Bldg. 



WILLIAMS LUMBER CO. 

LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIALS 
"We Sell Everything to Build Anything" 

S. Spring St. Dial 6101 

WILSON, N. C. 



CORBETT 
MOTOR CO. 



SALES and SERVICE 

202 E. Green St. Dial 6106 
WILSON, N. C. 



HUNT 

FUNERAL HOME 

Funeral Directors 

24-Hour Ambulance 
Service 

DAY or NIGHT 

Dial 3148 

115 N. Tarboro St. 
WILSON, N. C. 



28 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



BELL-ASKINS PLUMBING and 
HEATING COMPANY 



CONTRACTORS 
Plumbing and Heating Service 

415 W. Walnut GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



Phone 228 



BUILDERS SUPPLIES CO. 

Roofing — ♦ — Paint — ♦ — Hardware 
Builders' Supplies — ♦ — Ready-Mixed Concrete 

\ 107 N. Vine Phone 1500 

) GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



GOLDSBORO HEATING & 
PLUMBING SUPPLY COMPANY 



T. L. BLOW 
Plumbing and Heating Contractors 
108 N. James St. GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



Dial 157 



Your Safety is Our Business 

FIRESTONE 

STORES 

Corner Center and Ash Streets 
Phone 1301 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



Wayne Realty & 
Insurance Co., Inc. 

A Complete Real Estate and 
Insurance Service 

2I0 E. Walnut Phone I58 

GOLDCBORO, N. C. 



T* A. Loving & Company 

Contractors 

GOLDSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



Fuel Oil 

Kerosene 

Tel. 777 

J. J. BOWDEN 

Distributor for 

GULF OIL PRODUCTS 

1 000 S. George 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



' T ▼ ▼ T"Y"Y"T"T ▼TTTTTTTTT T" T" T" T" T"~T~" 



MADE-RITE 

is 

GOOD BREAD 

Baked by 
Made-Rite Bakery 

GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



NEWPORT NEWS, YA 

(Continued From Page 13) 

stein, Anne Rabinowitz, and Miss 
Devera Samuels. A social hour fol- 
lowed with Mrs. Bessie Sandler, hos- 
pitality chairman, in charge. 

Late Friday Evening Services 
were initiated on October 9 by 
Rabbi Samuel Adelman of Adath 
Jeshurun Synagogue. Mr. and Mrs. 
Sam Cohen were hosts at the Oneg 
Shabbat following the services in 
honor of the Bar Mitzvah of their 
son Robert. Robert was Bar Mitz- 
vah at the synagogue on the Sab- 
bath of October 10. Mazel Tov and 
best wishes to Robert and Mr. and 
Mrs. Cohen. 

The Jewish Community Center 
Kindergarten opened on September 
14, with the staff consisting of Mrs. 
Morris Mathews, Mrs. Harvey 
Rubin, and Mrs. Edna Wright. The 
festival of Succoth was celebrated 
by the youngsters with a program 
and party on Wednesday, Septem- 
ber 30. Those participating in the 
program were: Sheldon Axler, Su- 
san Barber, Tommie Becker, 
Wendy Carlton, Leslie Diamond, 
David Finkle, David Flakowitz, 
Samuel Fox, Shirley Goldwasser, 
Ellen Kurzer, Edward Olshansky, 
Leslie Picker, Sandra Kline, Harry 
Sands, Frances Satisky, Natalie Sie- 
gel, Maris Slavin, Mitchell Smith, 
Roslyn Smith, Allan Sternfield, 
Harry Wcinstock, and Harriet Yor- 
(Plcase Turn To Page 30) 




Louis L. Bennett of New York, until 
recently Executive Director of New 
York Association for New Americans, 
has been named Assistant Executive 
Vice-Chairman of the United Jewish 
Appeal. 



J. A. CAISON ; 

Roofing and Sheet ( 



Metal Works 



i 



726 N. John St. 



Phone 431 \ 



BUY or BUILD 
Conveniently with 

GOLDSBORO 
BUILDING AND 
LOAN ASSOCIATION 

The Oldest Financial Institution 
in Goldsboro, N. C. 

I 1 6 East Walnut St. 



WHITE'S LAUNDRY 
& CLEANERS, Inc. 

A COMPLETE LAUNDRY 
and 

DRY CLEANING SERVICE 

REFRIGERATED GARMENT STORAGE 

"There Is a Difference" 

300 North John Street 
Phones I0I0 — ION 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



EFIRD'S 
J DEPT. STORE | 

Values for Your Dollars 

GOLDSBORO, N. C. 

Goldsboro Insurance 
& Realty Company 

Fire, Life and Casualty 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 

I I SHOP AT SEARS AND SAVE I 




GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



Phone 3700 
215 W. Walnut St. 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



29 



DURHAM, N. C. 

Mrs. Sam Freedman, Correspondent 



Right after the Holidays, the or- 
ganizations started meetings. Ha- 
dassah's Five-In-One Drive was held 
at the Washington Duke Hotel 
with Mrs. E. J. Evans and Mrs. }. 
Rose was speakers. An Israeli Fash- 
ion show was also presented. 

Mrs. A. M. Dushkin of Jerusa- 
lem, Israel, the house guest of 
Mayor and Mrs. E. }. Evans, was 
the guest speaker at a lovely Hadas- 
sah luncheon. Invited guests were 
members of Hadassah and leaders 
of all Christian women's groups in 
the city. It was a wonderful public 
relations affair. 

In the evening, Mayor and Mrs. 
E. J. Evans entertained for Mrs. 
Dushkin at their home. 

The first Sisterhood meeting of 
the year proved to be a very enjoy- 
able one. Mrs. Sam Freedman, the 
president, welcomed the new mem- 
bers and presented each one of them 
with a Sisterhood Cookbook. Mrs. 
A. Miller, Judaism - in - the - home 
chairman presented a Shabbat 
Table — all the articles on display 
were from the Sisterhood Gift Shop 
of which Mrs. I. Golden is chair- 
man. 

Mrs. Leon Moel, Education 
Chairman, reported on a very suc- 
cessful Succah party for the Reli- 
gious School children. She stated 
that the School was progressing 
under the guidance of Rev. and 
Mrs. A. Miller. Mrs. A. Greenberg 
urged the members to sell more raf- 
fle tickets for the television set 



INGRAM & SUGGS 
Inc. 

Plumbing and Heating 
Contractors 

Phone 6-4951 - 2907 Roxboro Rd. 
DURHAM, N. C. 



which will be raffled off at the 
Chanukah bazaar. 

Mrs. M. Abelcop, program chair- 
man, then presented two students 
from Duke University who spoke 
on the relationship between the stu- 
dents and the townspeople. Mrs. I. 
Rancer prepared a beautiful Suc- 
coth table and served as hostess for 
the evening. 

Mrs. A. Rosenberg was hostess 
to the Mizrachi Women at her 
home. Mrs. J. Robbins presided 
over the business meeting. Mrs. A. 
Miller spoke on the meaning of Suc- 
coth, after which Mrs. J. Rose re- 
lated some experiences of her trip 
to Israel. Mrs. Robbins was elected 
as delegate to the National Miz- 
rachi Convention in Atlantic City. 

Sigmund Meyer presided at the 
B'nai B'rith meeting. Aabbi S. Sha- 
piro spoke on "The Significance of 
the Jewish Holy Year." A social 
hour followed the meeting. 

Jeannie Rancer was hostess to the 
Young Judeans at her home. She 
was assisted in serving a wiener sup- 
per by her mother, Mrs. May Ran- 
cer. 

Mayor E. J. Evans attended the 
U. S. Conference of Mayors in 
Montreal, Canada. The Mayor was 
accompanied by Mrs. Evans. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Keyer at- 
tended the World Series in New 
York City. 

Condolences are extended to the 
family of the late Mr. M. Jacobs, 
Miami, Florida. Mr. Jacobs were 
the father of Mrs. Joe Rose and the 
brother of Mrs. Ben Rose. 

Rabbi S. Shapiro resigned as spir- 
itual leader of Bcth-El-Synagogue. 

Estelle Rose and Doris Freed- 
man, Washington, D. C, visited 
with the Joe Rose's and J. Freed- 
mans. 



RALEIGH - DURHAM, N, C. 



State Distributing Corp. 

Distributors for 

• Mordecai Kosher Wines 
• Imperial Reserve 

• Garrett's Virginia Dare 
• Cook's Imperial Champagne 

• Williams and Humbert Dry Sack Sherries 
• Carlings Red Cap Ale and Black Label Beer 
® Heincken's Imported Holland Beer 
© Black Horse Ale 



112 South Blount Street 



Dial 3-9715 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



'Jfie (^utf/ux*, &i<e>64. Que. 

Distinctive Printing Is Economy 

324 South Blount Street Phone 4-1335 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Bohemia Restaurant 



Imported and Domestic 
DELICATESSEN — BEER — WINE 



2508l/ 2 Hillsboro St. 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



Telephone 3-0621 



T T T T T T T 

► y 
* ► 

► - 

► ► 

► ► 

► ► 

► ► 

► ► 



■TTTTTTTTTTTTTT 
TTTTTTTTTTTTTT 

•4 < 



RAWLS MOTOR CO., Inc. 



DeSOTO :-: PLYMOUTH 

Sales and Service 

405-7 Fayetteville Street Telephones: 2-4345 — 2-4141 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



DIAL 

4-4991 

T.V. 

Service Co. 

Authorized Service Station 

Television Receivers 
Installation and Service 

407 W. Peace Street 
RALEIGH, N. C. 




Has the 
Just - Right Fashions 
for 

— You 

— The Family 
— The Home 



II 

M 
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II 
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II 
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ii. 




PEPSI-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY OF RALEIGH 
3705 Hillsboro St. Telephone 3- 107! 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



H 
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H 
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Si 

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30 



The American Jewish TIMES-OUTLOOK 



ROBERT VERNON, Inc. 



I 12 W. Davie St. 



KAISER — HENRY J 

Sales and Service 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Phone 3-6481 



•DELICACIES FOR THE HOME, PICNIC AND PARTY" 

Warlick's Bakery 



2020-24 Cameron St. Cameron Village 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Phone 4-4028 



HUNT GENERAL TIRE COMPANY 

HEADQUARTERS FOR THE GENERAL TIRE WITH DUAL TRACTION 

Mc Dowell and Cabarrus Sts. Phone 2-0571 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

^■"^^^^^v^ 3 ^^v.■A^".s^v.■.^^^v^.■.■.■.■.■.■J^■.■.^^■.vv■.■.■.s■-^■J , .■.% l 



Marcus Famous Delicatessen 

STATE-WIDE CATERERS 
KOSHER and NON - KOSHER 

135 South Wilmington St. Phone 3-9734 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



PITTSBURGH 

PLATE GLASS COMPANY 

201 South Boylan Avenue Phone 4-2536 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



"TASTY PASTRIES 1 



QUALITY PASTRY SHOP 

)DING C 

Telephone 7404 



Specializing in 

HOLIDAYS — CELEBRATIONS — BIRTHDAY and WEDDING CAKES 



3104 Hillsboro Street 



j RALEIGH, N. C. 



"FRESH SEAFOOD DAILY" 

RALEIGH SEAFOOD COMPANY 



410 East Davie St. 



Phone 7748 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



Nash -Steele Motor Company, Inc. 

Distributors for 
Chrysler Corporation Parts and Accessories 
DODGE and PLYMOUTH CARS 
DODGE JOB - RATED TRUCKS 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



NEWPORT NEWS, YA. 

(Concluded From Page 28) 



burg. The parents joined the chil- 
dren in the celebration of the holi- 
day. 

On Tuesday afternoon Sept. 29th, 
Sisterhood held its annual Fall 
luncheon in honor of new mem- 
bers; plans were also announced for 
the annual Sisterhood Cabaret and 
Dance to be held Thanksgiving Day 
eve, Wednesday, Nov. 25th, pro- 
ceeds of which will go to the Build- 
ing Fund. 

Rodef Sholom Temple Brother- 
hood held its monthly "Minyan and 
Breakfast" on Sunday, Sept. 27th, 
with Mr. Sidney Batterson, presi- 



dent, presiding; Rabbi Finkle led an 
informal discussion of Jewish cur- 
rent events. 

An event of speical interest was 
the Bar Mitzvah of Elliott M. Fin- 
kle, son of Rabbi and Mrs. Jesse J. 
Finkle, on the Sabbath of Oct. 
17th. This is the first Bar Mitzvah 
in the Newport News Jewish Com- 
munity of a son of one of the local 
Rabbis. Hearties congratulations to 
Elliot and Rabbi and Mrs. Finkle. 

Plans are being made for the an- 
nual congregational meeting which 
will mark the 40th anniversary of 
Rodef Sholom Congregation. 




The above photograph shows 
1953 officers of the Jewish Commu- 
nity Council. They are left to right: 
Theodore H. Beskin, President; 
Mrs. William Diamonstein, first 
Vice-President; Mrs. Julius Rosen- 

"Home Made — Always Good 




A Standard for Qualify Candies Since 1965 
J. E. STETHACOS, Manager 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



baum, Secretary; Allen Conn, Fi- 
nancial Secretary. Other officers of 
the Council arc: Louis Morewitz, 
Second Vice-President; Robert 
Hecht, Third Vice-President; Larry 
Rabinowitz, Assistant Financial Sec- 
retary;